ULS STATE OF RULE OF 

LAW REPORT

 JANUARY – MARCH 2017

Rule 

of Law

Transparency 

and 

Accountability

Checks and 

Balances

Due Process 

and Climate 

of Legality

Human

Rights

I

ULS STATE OF RULE OF LAW REPORT

II

TABLE OF CONTENTS

FOREWORD 

      1

INTRODUCTION 

     2

OVERVIEW 

OF 

ISSUES     3

A. 

CHECKS 

AND 

BALANCES 

    3

B. DUE PROCESS AND THE CLIMATE OF LEGALITY 

6

C. THE STATE OF HUMAN RIGHTS   

 

 

12

D. TRANSPARENCY AND ACCOUNTABILITY 

 

21

E. 

GENERAL 

ISSUES 

     23

CONCLUSION 

      26

1

FOREWORD

 

The 1995 Constitution provides a broad framework for observance of the Rule of Law.  In 
its most basic form, the Rule of Law is about the principle that no one is above the law. The 
principle is intended to be a safeguard against arbitrary governance, whether by a totalitarian 
leader or by mob rule. It guards against excesses by the State, its agencies and the people 
that would foment dictatorship and anarchy. It fosters the welfare of the people and their 
nation by stipulating observance of rights and freedoms, security of persons and property and 
effective service delivery and guarding against injustices in all spheres of life.

The Uganda Law Society (ULS) Strategic Plan (2017 – 2021) has provided for the promotion 
and upholding of the Rule of Law as its third strategic thrust.  In a bid to roll out this 
strategy, the ULS has:

a) Set up a High-Level Rule of Law Advisory Panel supported by an in-house Rule of Law 

Officer;

b) Introduced the ULS Quarterly State of the Rule of Law Report;
c) Established the Annual High-Level Stakeholders’ forum on rule of law issues in October; 
d) Enhanced its strategic Public Interest Litigation and Advocacy campaign;
e) Created the Coalition in Support of the Independence of the Judiciary  (CISTIJ); 
f) Set up a Rule of Law Club programme to be rolled out in universities and secondary 

schools; and is

g) Working towards establishment of an effective and supportive Rule of Law Fund. 

This  Report  is  the  first  of  the  new  series  intended  to  highlight  positive  developments  and 
major challenges registered during each quarter of the year with regard to the Rule of Law, 
and to offer proposals for improvement.

The Report selects specific incidents affecting the Rule of Law indicating their legal implications 
and pointing to issues of concern that require additional attention and follow-up by all the key 
stakeholders.

For sources, the Report draws from Government documentation, the media, the legal fraternity 
and members of the public. In each of the Reports, issues of concern will be clustered under 
five main headings namely: checks and balances, due process and a climate of legality, human 
rights, transparency and accountability and general issues. 

It is our belief that a continuous follow-up on the recommendations in the report will lead 
to the creation of an environment that promotes and upholds the Rule of Law at all times. 
Working with strategic partnerships among the JLOS institutions and stakeholders, the ULS 
will follow up on the practical recommendations made for the attention of policy and decision 
makers. 

On behalf of the Executive Council, I would like to commend the ULS High Level Rule of Law 
Advisory Panel together with the secretariat team for their tremendous contribution to this 
report.

Francis Gimara 
President  - Uganda Law Society 

ULS STATE OF RULE OF LAW REPORT

2

INTRODUCTION

 

In its most basic form, the Rule of Law is about the principle that no one is above 
the  law.  The  principle  is  intended  to  be  a  safeguard  against  arbitrary  governance, 
whether by a totalitarian leader or by mob rule. It is particularly designed to guard 
against excesses by the State, its agencies and the people, with the goal of avoiding 
dictatorship  and  ensuring  that  we  do  not  revert  to  a  state  of  anarchy.  It  fosters 
the welfare of the people and their nation by stipulating observance of rights and 
freedoms, security of person and property, effective service delivery and guarding 
against injustices in all spheres of life.

According  to  the  2016  World  Justice  Project  Rule  of  Law  Index,  Uganda  ranks 
105

th

 out of 113 countries assessed during the period.  This ranking brings Uganda 

to  10  positions  lower  than  the  2015  ranking.

1

  Hence,  it  is  clear  that  the  Rule  of 

Law continues to decline on account of issues such as the level of corruption, the 
disregard of court orders, executive excess, weaknesses in the justice system, police 
brutality,  unlawful  arrests  and  detention,  and  malicious  prosecutions  among  other 
negative  developments.  The  economy  is  undergoing  shocks  and  pressures  with 
negative consequences because of the linkage between the Rule of Law and overall 
development.

While in the 1990s Uganda was largely regarded as a success story with respect to 
Rule of Law and good governance issues, recent statistics are less flattering. According 
to various reports, Uganda is a country with a superficial democracy, characterised 
by a semblance of the Rule of Law but in actual fact the respect of the rule of law is 
declining. 

 As part of its 2017 to 2021 Strategic Plan, the ULS has adopted a more proactive 
approach in dealing with issues relating to the rule of law in a bid to curb impunity, 
promote transparency and ensure the observance of due process of the law at all 
times. Under Strategic Objective 3 of the Plan which is “to promote the Rule of Law 
and human rights protection”
 the ULS shall continue to protect and assist the public 
in Uganda in all matters touching, ancillary or incidental to the law and to assist the 
Government and the courts in all matters affecting legislation and the administration 
and practice of law in Uganda; respectively. 

The achievement of the objective entails creating strategic partnerships with relevant 
stakeholders including the JLOS institutions, to carry out research, produce and share 
evidence-based  position  information  on  relevant  issues.  This  Report  is  among  the 
many steps taken towards the achievement of the objectives of ULS with respect to 
the Rule of Law. 

1 The change in rankings was calculated by comparing the positions of the 102 countries measured in 2015 with the 

rankings of the same 102 countries in 2016, exclusive of the 11 new countries indexed in 2016

3

OVERVIEW OF ISSUES 

A. CHECKS AND BALANCES 

The  Rule  of  Law  ideally  requires  those  who  govern  to  limit  their  power  to  what 
is confined in the law. The constitutional principle of the Separation of Powers is 
designed to ensure that there is a balance of power and that no one organ of the 
State becomes overly powerful in relation to the others and especially with respect 
to the population at large.

The three arms of government are separate but mutually supportive in exercising their 
functions in order to prevent the abuse of power.  A system of Checks and Balances 
has been adopted by modern societies by putting in place constitutional, institutional 
and  non-governmental  constraints  to  limit  the  reach  of  government  officials.  The 
essence of the system is that governmental power should not go unchecked as it 
may lead to abuse of authority, wasted resources, and ineffectiveness in achieving 
the most basic purposes of government.

 
During the reporting period, the following issues pertaining to the observance of 
checks and balances arose:

a) The award of UGX 6 Billion Bonus Payment by Government 

through the Uganda Revenue Authority 

42 public officials received a total of UGX 6 billion from H.E. the President Yoweri 
Museveni as a reward (dubbed the “presidential handshake”) for their participation 
and success in arbitral proceedings in two tax disputes against Heritage Oil and Gas 
Ltd (HOGUL) and Tullow Oil Uganda Ltd. 

The issue triggered public outrage and raised fundamental questions regarding the 
legality  and  the  procedural  propriety  of  the  award.    In  the  absence  of  an  official 
policy, concerns were raised that such awards would set a dangerous precedent and 
provide a foundation for future payments of large bonuses by those who claim to 
have contributed in one way or another in this and future similar ventures when the 
oil money begins to flow.  

The  Parliamentary  Committee  on  Commissions,  Statutory  Authorities  and  Staff 
Enterprises (COSASE) was subsequently tasked to investigate the circumstances of 
the handshake. Among other stakeholders,

2

 the ULS President was invited to meet 

with the members of the Committee on 20

th

 February 2017 to offer guidance on the 

procedural propriety of this award.

The ULS offered a detailed position

3

 noting inter alia that although it has severally been 

opined by among others the Attorney General (who is the Principal Legal Advisor to 

2  Including the Uganda Revenue Authority, the Attorney General, the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources among 

others.

3  See the detailed ULS Legal Opinion on the Legality of the award of Uganda Shillings Six Billion awarded to public 

servants for winning arbitration case with M/s Heritage Oil & Gas Limited.

ULS STATE OF RULE OF LAW REPORT

4

the Government of Uganda) that the awards were authorised by the President under 
Articles 98 and 99 of the Constitution, a careful reading of the said articles does not 
afford the President carte blanche to make such awards to public servants or indeed 
to any other individual without a supportive legal framework. A detailed reading of 
the said Articles reveals that the prerogative power asserted by the Attorney General 
and the recipients of the award is not absolute and must be exercised in accordance 
with the Constitution. 

The  ULS  further  contended  that  if  the  President  is  to  exercise  his  prerogative  to 
reward  individuals  who  have  made  an  outstanding  contribution  to  public  service 
through  monetary  rewards  that  will  have  an  effect  on  the  Consolidated  Fund;  the 
same must be done through an Appropriation or Supplementary Appropriation Act. 

ULS also noted that the Attorney General’s Chambers was affected by a conflict of 
interest which compromised the ability of the office to provide unbiased technical 
advice to the President, given that several officials in his Chambers were reported to 
have been beneficiaries of the award.

Furthermore  under  Section  58  of  the  Public  Finance  Management  Act  (PFMA), 
withdrawals from the Petroleum Fund must be done strictly via an Appropriation Act 
and upon sanction of the Auditor General. In the instant case, the award was alleged 
to be a withdrawal from the Petroleum Fund.  If that was indeed the case, such award 
ought to have been done in accordance with the above-mentioned law.

Under Section 32 (1) of the Public Finance Management Act  the withdrawal of any 
monies from the Consolidated Fund can only be executed by a warrant of expenditure 
issued by the Minister of Finance to the Accountant General upon issuance of a grant 
of credit by the Auditor General. 

Legal issues arising: 

1. Whether the President as the fountain of honour can give awards under Articles 

98, 99 of the Constitution without an enabling legal framework

2. Section 79 of the Public Finance Management Act, No. 3 of 2015 makes it an 

offence to incur unauthorized expenditure on behalf of Government or to divert 
public funds for unauthorized Activities.  On conviction, such an offence attracts 
a sentence of a fine not exceeding five hundred Currency points or imprisonment 
for a period of four years.

3. Breach of the procedure stipulated under the Public Finance Management Act, 

No. 3 of 2015 —which requires Parliament’s approval of all payments made out 
of the consolidated fund. 

5

Recommendations: 

1. There is a need for clear guidelines on the award/reward of public officials from 

the Consolidated Fund of the recently-established Petroleum Fund in order to 
award  exceptional  performance  while  maintaining  the  requisite  accountability 
and transparency; 

2. All payments made out of the Consolidated Fund and Petroleum Fund must be 

executed in full compliance with the laws governing these institutions; and 

3. As the principal legal advisor to Government, the Office of the Attorney General 

should avoid situations which lead to a conflict of interest.

b)   Issuance  of  the  Justice  Kavuma  interlocutory  order  and  its 

implications for relations with Parliament

On 9

th

 January 2017, the Deputy Chief Justice Steven Kavuma sitting as a single Judge 

issued  an  interim  injunction  in  a  constitutional  matter  restraining  Parliament,  any 
person, or authority from investigating, questioning or inquiring into the impugned 
UGX 6 Billion award and staying all proceedings of whatever nature which may be 
pending before any fora until the final Petition was disposed of. The order arose out 
of an application by a lawyer named Eric Sabiiti who sought the interim order in a bid 
to bar any person from investigating the presidential handshake.

The order raised concerns about the legality of issuing an injunction against Parliament 
stopping  it  from  exercising  its  constitutional  mandate  to  provide  oversight  on  the 
spending of public resources. There were also concerns regarding the overall mutual 
respect of the arms of governance in the performance of their functions.

Under the Constitution, Parliament exercises legislative and deliberative functions. 
The  Judiciary  is  mandated  to  determine  whether  legislative  outcomes  conform  to 
the Constitution. It is most unusual for the Judiciary to intervene by stopping the 
deliberative process of Parliament. This is so because no issue of legality is likely to 
arise until the final outcome of the deliberations. Therefore, the misgivings over the 
interim order issued by a single judge of the Constitutional Court should be viewed 
in this context. 

The other concern is that the order was issued without proper due process, in that 
the other parties concerned such as Parliament were not given an opportunity to be 
heard. Parliament rightly protested the court order as being improper but it obeyed 
and refrained from continuing with the investigations. The ULS commends Parliament 
for this development which was in accordance with the Rule of Law.

ULS STATE OF RULE OF LAW REPORT

6

Legal Issues arising:

1. Under the Constitution, Parliament is empowered to legislate and deliberate matters 

of public interest and the Judiciary is empowered to test the legality of legislation 
made by Parliament

2. The Judiciary has no power to bar the deliberations of Parliament, which was an 

apparent infringement of the Separation of Powers principle, and undermines the 
power of the Judiciary to act as a necessary check on Parliament in future cases 
where the latter institution has erred.

Recommendations:

1. The ULS urges the respective arms of Government to maintain mutual respect of 

each other’s mandates in the performance of their functions. 

2.  That  Government  should  consider  the  implementation  of  the  Commonwealth 

(Latimer  House)  Principles  on  three  braches  of  Government  to  enable  the 
development  of  a  better  relationship  between  them  based  on  respect  of  rule  of 
law, the promotion and protection of fundamental human rights and entrenchment 
of  good  governance  based  on  the  highest  standards  of  honesty,  probity  and 
accountability. 

B. DUE PROCESS AND THE CLIMATE OF LEGALITY

The concept of due process speaks to fair treatment as a citizen’s entitlement through 
the normal judicial system. No person shall be deprived of the right to life, liberty or 
property  without  due  process  of  law.  It  guards  against  practices  and  policies  which 
violate basic precepts of fundamental fairness in court and related proceedings.

At its very basis, the principle of legality can be described as a mechanism to ensure that 
the state, its organs and its officials do not consider themselves to be above the law in 
the exercise of their functions but remain subject to it.

Over the review period, the following incidents pertaining to the due process of law and 
legality arose:

a) Constitutional Court Decision on Interim Orders 

On the 23

rd

 February 2017, three Justices of the Constitutional Court (namely Fredrick 

Egonda-Ntende,  Kenneth  Kakuru,  and  Elizabeth  Musoke  JCC)  delivered  a  landmark 
decision  in  the  case  of  Murisho  Shafi  &  5  Others  v.  Attorney  General  &  Inspectorate  of 
Government.

4

 The main import of the ruling was that any decision rendered by a single 

Judge  or  a  panel  of  three  Justices  in  a  constitutional  matter  did  not  conform  to  the 

4 Constitutional Application No.2 of 2017; < http://www.ulii.org/ug/judgment/constitutional-court/2017/1/>.

7

jurisdictional  requirement  of  Article  137(2)  of  the  Constitution  which  stipulates  as 
follows: “When sitting as a Constitutional Court, the Court of Appeal shall consist of a 
Bench of five members of that court”.  

The ruling was of considerable significance on account of the fact that since the 1995 
Constitution was enacted, several interlocutory matters before the Court have been 
decided by a coram of fewer than five members.  Indeed, a practice had developed in 
which a single judge of the court—as in the Eric Sabiiti ruling reviewed in the previous 
section of this report—would preside over a matter and deliver a ruling.  Many of those 
rulings had the effect of stifling further action on the substantive cause.  For instance, 
interlocutory orders by a single judge of the Court have prevented the continuance of 
prosecutions at the Anti-Corruption Court and by the Director of Public Prosecutions. 
Therefore, in making their judgment in the Murisho case the judges must have been 
alive  to  the  fact  that  interim  orders  issued  especially  by  single  Judges—even  when 
well-intentioned—had been grossly abused by both courts and litigants.  Indeed, in the 
recent past the ULS has expressed its dissatisfaction with some of the decisions issued 
by a number of justices of the Constitutional Court in outright disregard of the law and 
best practices.

In his ruling, Justice Egonda-Ntende stated that fidelity to the law (an essential strand 
underpinning  the  Rule  of  Law)  would  compel  the  Court  of  Appeal  to  respect  the 
provisions  of  Article  137(2),  however  inconvenient;  the  inconvenience  in  this  case 
being the necessity of assembling a full Bench of the Court to determine an application 
for interim relief.   In making this recommendation, the court was also alive to the fact 
that decisions made without jurisdiction are a nullity whether declared so or not.  

Controversy  has  however  been  created  by  the  consequential  orders  and  directives 
issued by Justice Kakuru. In addition to an order referring the matter before them to a 
coram of five Justices of the court, Justice Kakuru made the following consequential 
orders:

(i)  All interim orders issued by a single Justice of the Constitutional Court which are 

still in force are null and void and of no effect;

(ii)  Any interim or substantive orders of injunction issued by a coram of three Justices 

of  the  Constitutional  Court  which  are  still  in  force  are  null  and  void  and  of  no 
effect; and

(iii)  The  Registrar  of  the  court  was  directed  to  place  all  pending  constitutional 

applications  before  a  full  coram  of  the  Constitutional  Court  for  determination. 
Such applications should include all those made by either a single justice or a coram 
of three—but whose rulings had not been delivered by the time of the ruling.

A number of clarifications need to be made with respect to Justice Kakuru’s ruling:

(i) The majority decision in the case is that by Justices Egonda-Ntende and Musoke;
(ii) The views of a minority judge although relevant, do not carry the day;