Welcome to the 2

nd

 Thai Australian business studies conference 

On  behalf  of  the  conference  committee  of  this  conference,  I  would  like  to  extend  a  warm  welcome  to  researchers, 
academics  in  Thai  and business studies, and  ‘friends  of Thailand’ joining  us  in Melbourne for  what promises to be a 
refreshing, innovative and stimulating conference on contemporary Thai and Australian business and management. 

This year we have been pleased to be able to work with the Graduate School of Commerce, Burapha University and 
RMIT’s Centre for Business Education (CBER). Their contributions to this conference are significant. It is my hope that 
papers  and  presentations  from  this  conference  will  give  us  some  interesting  and  profound  ‘ideas’  on  challenges  of 
modern management in Thailand and South East Asian from both Australian and Thai perspectives. 

Finally, I hope this event will promote dialogues among young researchers in our discipline and strengthen academic 
bonds among Australia, Thailand and other countries in South East Asia.  

Welcome to the conference! 

Associate Professor Nattavud Pimpa 

 
Conference Convenor 2014

 

School of Management, RMIT University 
 

 

Guest Speakers

  

Dr Simon Wallace 
(Honorary Consul General) 
 
Royal Thai Consulate General, Melbourne 
 
Simon  Wallace  was  born  in  Yorkshire  in  the  United 
Kingdom and came to Australia with his wife Vacharee in 
1978. He has represented Thailand, here in Victoria, for 
over  twenty  five  years,  originally  as  Honorary  Consul 
and  then  as  Honorary  Consul  General.  For  many  years 
he was both a dentist and an honorary diplomat. He has 
now hung up his drill to concentrate on representing and 
promoting Thailand. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Associate Professor Nattavud Pimpa 
School of Management, 
College of Business 
RMIT University  
 
Dr  Pimpa  has  been  exploring  various  issues  in 
international  business  in  South  East  Asia.  His  projects 
include  the 

corporate  social  responsibility 

and 

international  business  in  South  East  Asia,  mining  and 
women empowerment in Thailand and Laos, Business-
to-Business  values  and  relationship  in  Thailand, 
international  leadership  in  Australia.  Prior  to  joining 
RMIT,  he  worked  in  various  projects  at  the  Ministry  of 
Education  (Thailand),  Monash  University,  Burapha 
University, and British Council.  

 

This conference is proudly supported by The Graduate School of Commerce, Burapha University the School of Management and Centre for Business Education 

Research, RMIT University 

 
 
 

 

8.45 am – 9.00 am Registration / Coffee 

9.00am – 9.30 am Welcome/Opening Address  

Level 9, Room 12 

 

Welcome 

 

Professor Gill Palmer  

(Vice Chancellor and President) 

 

Professor Pauline Stanton,  

(Head, School of Management) 

 

Dr Simon Wallace,  

(Honorary Consul General, Royal Thai Consulate General, Melbourne) 

 

9.30 am – 10.30 am 

Session 1: Skills and Organisation in the Thai context 

Level 9, Room 12 

 

Skills development in English language teachers in Thai higher education: towards learner-centred learning? 
Anyarat Tandamrong, 

Monash University 

 

Since 1999, with the passing of the Education Act: An Education Reform Act for Future Development of the Thai people, all teachers in all sectors of 
education  in  Thailand  have  been  required  to  employ  learner-centred  pedagogy.  However,  fifteen  years  after  the  passing  of  this  act  there  is  little 
evidence  of  teachers  implementing  its  requirements.    Some  researchers  suggest  that  learner-centred  education  (LCE)  is  difficult  to  apply  due  to 
numbers of factors including teachers’ lack of knowledge of what it is (Punthumasen, 2007), and insufficient support (Wichadee, 2011; Noom-ura, 
2013).  This  paper  reports  on  a  PhD  study  in  progress  where  I  am  investigating  three  dimensions  of  teachers’  beliefs  and  practices  in  university 
settings. These dimensions are: (1) teachers’ understandings of LCE; (2) teachers’ perceptions of their academic/professional identities (as teachers 
and learners); and (3) teachers’ experiences of professional learning/development. A qualitative case study involves interviewing and observing Thai 
English  language  teachers  in  contrasting  university  settings  in  Thailand,  and  utilising  narrative  inquiry  methods  to  construct  critical  accounts  of 
teachers’ stories, experiences, and practices. 

 
Quality of work life and stress influencing organizational commitment of professional nurses in private 
hospitals in Chon Buri province 
Pimjai Lertsisuwattana, Somchai Yingyuen, Sonkhla Hongsawanat, Khemya Khiniman    
Phairin   Thongpharp and Penphicha Kasemphongthongdee 

Burapha University 

 

This research study focuses on the relationship between a quality of work life, stress level and organizational commitment of professional nurses in 
the private hospitals in Chon Buri Province. The subjects included 299 professional nurses from eight private hospitals. The data were collected a 
mean of questionnaire survey. The statistics to analyse the data were frequency, percentage, mean, standard deviation, Correlation coefficient, 
ANCOVA and ANOVA. The majority of the participants were female, in the age of 25-35, had 1-2 years of work experience, were single and worked 
in in Patient Department, earned more than 30,001 baht monthly. Most subjects had moderate level of stress with the overall quality of work life and 
organizational commitment at the high level. The results showed a positive correlation (p < .05) between a quality of work life and organizational 
commitment. A quality of work life correlated to organizational commitment with no difference when gender, work length, marital status and working 
department. Moreover, it found that different level of stress positively affected to organizational commitment (p < .05). The research findings 
suggested that nurse with low level of stress had the higher organizational commitment than nurses with moderate, high and severe level, 
respectively. 

 
International  mining,  empowerment  and  skills  development  for  women:  Stories  from  mining  industry  in 
Thailand 
Nattavud Pimpa

, RMIT University; 

Brigitte Tenni

, The University of Melbourne; 

Sheree Gregory

, RMIT University and 

Timothy 

Moore

, The University of Melbourne 

 

International mining industry has long been one of the major contributors to the development of modern Thai economy. Despite the criticisms on its 
environmental and social impacts, the benefits of mining industry to the local community can be eclectic. At this stage, the impacts of mining 

 
 
 

 

industry in Thailand on women and girls remain unclear. This study examines perspectives of villagers and the community leaders in a mining 
community in the central of Thailand. The approach for this research project is phenomenography, in order to understand experiences and stories 
from the community. The key findings from the mining community in Thailand confirm two approaches that mining multinational corporations use to 
empower women. They include (1) peer-to-peer vocational and professional group, (2) modern recruitment and retention policies, and (3) 
community-based activities for women. The results also confirm certain characteristics of public-private partnership under the current socio-political 
system in Thailand.

         

 

 

10.30 am – 11 am Morning Tea / Break 

11 am – 1pm 

Work of Leadership Cluster ‘Explorespace' 

session 

Level 8, Room 9 

 

The Centre for Business Education Research invites 
you to an 'Explorespace' session being organised by 
the “Work of Leadership Cluster”. Academic and PhD 
colleagues are encouraged to attend and actively 
participate. 
 

The session will commence with brief presentations on two new 
concepts of leadership that are emerging as complexities in the global 
environment and continue to challenge the traditional approaches to 
leadership. 
 
The presentations will be followed by an 'explorespace' opportunity 
where participants will be asked to consider and discuss the following 
question: 
 
What impact may these emergent leadership theories have on your 
research, leadership and/or design of business education? 
 
Responses will be used to explore how we might design cross-discipline 
research into emergent approaches to leadership. 
 
Presenters 
Dr Nuttawuth Muenjohn will first present the concept of Design 
Leadership that is emerging as the role of leadership in the design 
process is explored. Based on his recent research in Australia and Asia, 
Dr Muenjohn will outline the impact design leadership has on improved 
performance. 
 
Professor Sandra Jones will present the concept of Distributed 
Leadership (DL) that is emerging as a more shared, collaborative 
approach to leadership is adopted. Professor Jones will introduce the 6E 
Conceptual Model for Distributed Leadership recently designed as an 
outcome of a project funded by the Office for Learning and Teaching 
(OLT). Details on this project and the enabling and evaluating resources 
designed from the project can be obtained from 
www.distributedleadership.com.au. 

 

11 am – 12 noon   

Session 2: Management in the  

Thai Context 

Level 9, Room 12 

 

Performance Model Enhancing the Sustainable 
Competitiveness of Business 
Boonlada Kunavetchakij, Juntima Potisarattana, Krit 
Jarinto, 

Burapha University

 

 

This article presents a conceptual framework of organizational 
development for a sustainable high-performance organization with a 
concern for social responsibility; focusing on a shared value between 
corporate and society, and modeling a practice relating to the creation of 
economic and social value to both the company and society. This is to 
enhance the competitiveness of the business sustainably and 
dependability to the community. In presentation, it involves a literature 
review and a case study of the high performing organizations. The 
results found that the today’s organizations have focused on creating 
shared value (CSV) in equilibrium because it is believed that the 
operation caused by the interaction between the organization and 
community brings about a mutual growth; that creates a sustainable 
balance. 

 
The Antecedents of Manufacturing Practices in Agile 
Environment in Thai Automotive Parts Industry 
Ploy Sud-On, 

RMIT University 

 

In today’s fast-changing business environment, the agile practices and 
its capabilities to quickly respond to the competition and market demand 
is not just desirable but is becoming a requirement for organisations’ 
success. This study explores the manufacturing practices being adopted 
in agile environment. The study aims to identify the antecedents of 
manufacturing practices between Large Scale Enterprises (LSEs) and 
Small Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in the emerging economies, 
particularly in the Thai automotive industry.  
 
The Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) technique was undertaken to 
perform both exploratory and confirmatory assessment on the key 
manufacturing practices that firms need to adopt in order to achieve 
agile capabilities. The data was collected through a drop-and-collect 
method to 279 automotive companies from Industrial Estate Authority of 
Thailand (IEAT). The results revealed that in agile environment, 
integrated production development, modularised manufacturing and 
information technology integration were found to be the key practices 
promoted agile capabilities. 

 
The Role of a Powerful Team in the Telecom Business 
in Thailand 
Prewparicha  Rucharoenpornpanich, Lakkana  
Teerasakworakun 
and  Ittidath   Likithara 
Phatre  Friestad

2

 

Burapha University 

 
 
 

 

 

This article was written to investigate types of teams and the role of 
effective teamwork. The aim of this article was to study the role of 
effective teamwork in telecom business, individual differences affect the 
role of team work differently, and to see whether different types of teams 
had any effects on the role of effective teamwork. The sample consisted 
of 400 individuals surveyed in 4 companies, including TOT, AIS, TURE 
and DTAC. 
The results indicated that the types of problem-solving teams and self-
managed work teams had similarities in the way they worked at a high 
level. A group of qualified individuals were assembled in internal 
departments to drive feedback and selected the solution by allowing 
team members to assess the interoperability. 
The study of the sample from 4 companies in the telecom business also 
showed that the staff emphasized on clear roles and work assignment. 
When action is taken, clear assignments are made, accepted, and 
carried out. Work is fairly distributed among team members and then the 
mission and goal are set for teamwork to make the telecom business 
successful. 

 

12 noon  - 12.45 pm 

Session 3: Health and Borderlands forum  

Level 9, Room 12 

What influences refugees’ access of non-ration food 
items in refugee camps on the Thai-Burma border? 

Jason Kollios, Timothy Moore  

Nossal Institute for Global Health, The University of Melbourne 

Approximately 150,000 refugees living in the nine Thailand-Burma 
border camps are reliant on ration food. We conducted this quantitative 
study to determine what influences refugee households’ access of non-
ration food, and how and what items are obtained. The majority 
accessed non-ration food, especially vegetables, mostly to supplement 
the amount and diversity of ration food. Nearly half used non-ration food 
daily. Expense and legal restrictions on refugees’ movement and/or 
employment were the predominant barriers to households obtaining 
more food. Study recommendations include increases in funding for 
food, farming and work/income opportunities, and household income, as 
well as research into program alternatives. 

Acceptability of rice and corn blended fortified food 
products among children aged 6 – 24 months and 
their caregivers in Mae La Refugee Camp, Thailand 

Nova Wilks 

Nossal Institute for Global Health, The University of Melbourne 

Child malnutrition continues to occur at unacceptable levels in food-aid 
dependent refugee populations along the Thailand / Myanmar border. 
This study assessed the acceptability of two fortified food products with 
children and their caregivers in Mae La Refugee Camp. Using a mixed-
methods case-crossover randomized controlled trial design, the study 
found no differences in the extent of acceptability between the two food 
blends for children, while caregivers reported a preference for a rice-
based blend more consistent with traditional food staples. Results have 
assisted in determining which foods are most amenable to regular and 
ongoing use, thus informing decision-making regarding food ration 
provision. 

 

 

 
 
 

 

 

Letting Refugees Decide What is Fair: A Study of 
Community Managed Targeting for Food Distribution 
in Refugee Camps on the Thailand-Burma Border 

Ahmad Abou-Sweid and Timothy Moore 

Nossal Institute for Global Health, The University of Melbourne 

Funding cuts instigated community managed targeting (CMT) food 
rationing in closed refugee camps along the Thailand-Burma border in 
2013. This qualitative study assessed refugees’ perceptions thereof. 41 
key informant interviews were conducted with refugee 
subgroups/organisations in two camps. Thematic analysis revealed poor 
understanding regarding rationing decisions. Various demographics 
viewed food rations insufficient. All groups wanted equal ration 
distribution. Muslim business owners felt over-represented in ration cuts 
from income overestimation. Hence, CMT resulted in feelings of 
unfairness not attributed to ethnic/religious discrimination. Refugees’ 
increased understanding of CMT will take longer to achieve. CMT 
enhances self-reliance in preparation for repatriation or resettlement. 

 

1 pm – 1.45 pm Lunch 

 

1.45 pm  - 2.30 pm 

Session 4: Markets and Behaviour 

Level 9, Room 12 

Online impulse purchasing process and continuance: a study of Thai consumers 
Korawin Kemapanmanas, 

Burapha University

; Wutichai sittimalakorn, 

Burapha University

; Wannee Kaemkate, 

Chulalongkorn  University

 

 

Online reservation in Thailand has increased substantially in recent years. It is very important for businesses, particularly travel agencies and 
tourism-related service providers to understand consumer behavior toward this technology, in order to design their marketing and service 
strategies/approaches to be best fit and be able to retain customers. The purpose of this study is to develop an impulse purchasing process 
explaining Thai consumer’s buying process while making a purchase in the online marketplace. An online survey questionnaire was used to collect 
data from 780 Thai people using convenience sampling, and the data analyzed by using Partial Least Squares (PLS) Path Model and by using the 
WarpPLS 4.0 software. The results indicate that buyers’ emotions toward online reservation store are caused by online reservation store  
tmospherics; online reservation store design and online reservation store content; through purchase intention. The actual purchase is influenced by 
their intention to purchase from online store, which, in turn, is determined by their emotions toward online shopping. An actual online purchase was 
also found to create buyers online purchasing satisfactions that significantly affect their future intention to repurchase online. As well, the model is 
able to explain and predict their online purchasing behaviors and continuance. 

 

 
Applying combined technology acceptance model and the theory of planned behaviour to study the effect of 
the intention to play online games in Thailand 

Teetut Tresirichod, Krit Jarinto, Sarunya Lertbuddharuch, Graduate School of Commerce, Burapha University  

The research was carried out to study the intention to apply combined technology model and the theory of planned behaviour (C-TAM-TPB) to 
study the effect if the intention to play online game in Thailand. The results of this study confirm that the Perceived usefulness, Human-computer 
interaction, Social interaction and attitude toward playing online games could be used to predict behavioural intention. The insignificance of the link 
flow experience, perceived enjoyment, subjective norms, and perceived behavioural control to intention indicates the need for further research in 
the context of online gaming. Notably, this study finds that Perceived usefulness is a more important factor than the attitude toward playing online 
games in predicting behavioural intention and Perceived enjoyment is a more important factor than Perceived ease of use in predicting attitude 
toward playing online games. 

Factors influencing the relationship between knowledge management activities and intellectual capital of 
companies in the Palm oil industry in Thailand 
Natee  Boonkaew, Sirinya Wiroonrath, Zait Pattanamas, Banpot Wiroorath 

Burapha University 

 

The research aimed at studying factors influencing the relationship between knowledge management activities and intellectual capital of 

 
 
 

 

companies in the Palm Oil Industry in Thailand. The study was conducted through the structural equation (Structural Equation Model: SEM). The 
data were collected from the samples who were 400 operational-level employees of the Palm Oil Industry through questionnaire with .975credibility 
or reliability calculated with overall coefficient alpha. The findings revealed that the Structural Equation Model was consistent or in harmony with 
the empirical data. This could be proved by certain values of statistics such as the Normal Chi-Square (CMIN / DF) equaling 1.995, Normed Fit 
index (NFI) equaling 0.908, the Comparative Fit Index (CFI) equaling 0.952, the Root Mean Square Error (RMR) equaling 0.03, Mean Square Error 
of Approximation (RMSEA) equaling 0.05, and Root Mean Residual (RMR) equaling 0.031. From the analysis, it was found that factors of 
knowledge management were positively correlated with intellectual capital. In fact, knowledge management process capability which was one of 
the knowledge management factors could influence intellectual capital rather than the knowledge infrastructure capability.

 

2.30 pm – 3.00 pm Afternoon Tea / Break 

3 pm  - 4 pm 

Session 5: Thailand and the World 

Level 9, Room 12 

 

Intercultural Issues: English-Thai code-switching and loan words in Thai popular music. 
Anyarat Tandamrong, 

Monash University

; Kunlakarn Ritruechai Ratanavaraha 

Royal Thai Armed Force

 

English language is a lingua franca used among Thailand and ASEAN countries. In Thailand, English is viewed as a foreign language (EFL) but 
has slowly become a part of Thais’ daily lives as English Code-switching (CS) is presented in Thai language use.  
This study reported types of code-switching used in Thai songs (Siam Top 20 chart in 2012), most of the CS appears in word level. English 
Loanwords in Thai popular music reflects the influences of English globalization and intercultural issues such as Western cultural values that have 
been interwoven into Thai culture. In language teaching, general public’s understanding of CS suggests that Thais already know some English 
vocabularies to relate to when they try to communicate in English. Perhaps innovative classroom activities along with the uses of Thai-and English 
code-switching would help Thai learners to acquire language proficiency and able to communicate with the ASEAN Community. 

 

The Motivation on Willingness to work: Lao Women in ASEAN Countries 
Sanya Kongsrinual, Khampheng Phathadavong, Phouthavong Phathadavong, Sukanya Saleephaeng,  
and Sathit Pitivara
  

Burapha University 

The objective of this study was to investigate the motivation of Lao women in Vientiane who had willingness to work in ASEAN 
countries. The sample of this study consisted of 300 students studying in the higher diploma or a bachelor’s degree at the 
Business Administration College of LAO PDR. Questionnaires were used for data collection, and the statistics employed of this 
study consisted of average, percentage and One-way Analysis of Variance. The results of the survey revealed that the countries in 
which Lao women were the most interested in working were Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand respectively. The job sectors that 
they chose the most were Banking and Finance, Commerce, and Education respectively. Furthermore, skills that they needed to 
develop the most were communication skills and professional skills related to their work. 

Feasibility research and development of curriculum for Thai LOTE for the Victorian certificate of education (VCE) 

Simon Johnson, 

Australian Asian Associates

;  Sopha Cole, 

The Thai Language School of Melbourne

 

In 2009 the Thai Language School of Melbourne received ATI (Australia Thailand Institute) funding to develop a curriculum for 
Thai as a Language Other Than English (LOTE) to become an accredited subject in Victorian schools. The research projected that 
the number of potential students who will study Thai will continue to increase and there are also now many Thai language schools 
in states across Australia. The Thai community in Australia is rapidly growing and has a demand for their children to learn Thai 
language and heritage. The research also found that it is not only Thais with a Thai family background who are interested in the 
Thai language, but Australians are also prepared to encourage their children to learn Thai as an Asian second language. This 
feasibility research has recently been submitted to the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA) for consideration. It 
was submitted with a report on the State of Thai in Australian schools. The report was funded by the Thai Embassy and is based 
on the results confirming strong interest in Thai language. VCAA required a background report concerned with aspects such as the 
history of Thai in Australia, its significance, numbers of students, teachers and resources required to progress to its accreditation 
stage. This paper presents the results of this research and the development of the curriculum as well as the VCAA report.

 

4  pm – 4.30 pm Closing Address  

Level 9, Room 12 

 
 

 
 
 

 

Program 

2

nd

 Thai Australian Business Studies Conference: 

Regionalisation, Skills Development and Thailand 

Friday, 24 October 2014 

RMIT University Building 80, Level 9, Room 12  

445 Swanston Street Street, Melbourne 

 

8.45 am – 9.00 am Registration / Coffee  

Level 9 Room 12 

9.00 am – 9.30 am Welcome / Opening Address  

Level 9 Room 12 

9.30 am – 10.30 am  

Session 1: Skills and Organisation in the Thai context 

Level 9 Room 12

 

10.30 am – 11 am Morning Tea / Break 

11 am – 1pm 

Work of Leadership Cluster ‘Explorespace' session 

Level 8 Room 9 

11 am – 12 noon  

Session 2: Management in the Thai Context 

Level 9 Room 12 

12 noon – 1 pm 

Session 3: Health and Borderlands Forum 

Level 9 Room 12 

1 pm – 1.45 pm Lunch 

1.45 pm – 2.30 pm  

Session 4: Markets and Behaviour 

Level 9 Room 12

 

2.30 pm – 3 pm Afternoon Tea / Break 

3 pm – 4 pm  

Session 5: Thailand and the World 

Level 9 Room 12

 

4 pm – 4.30 pm Closing Address