INITIAL DRAFT

WHITE PAPER

The Essence of Life Project

The Future of Water

(Produced October/2014)

CRUNCH NESTLÉ CAMPAIGN

“Water, is the oil of the 21

st

 Century.”

SUMMARY

Background:

• The search for free flowing potable water, a necessity of life, has been a 
constant issue in many regions of the world, and often so throughout history. 
Many cities were constructed around the availability of water from nearby rivers, 
lakes, and streams, sometimes to their detriment regarding floods, etc.  Today, 
our supply of available water is under siege, not just due to the elements of 
nature, like drought, toxic dumping by irresponsible companies, natural damages,
misuse, etc., but often by the sheer “theft” of water by various and greedy means 
and nefarious political deals. 

• 2013 was the driest year in California’s history – since records started being 
kept approximately 100 years ago. Our state water reservoirs are critically low, 
and farmers, lawmakers, and environmentalists’ growing concerns have gone 
from a slow drip to a raging storm accordingly. 

• As of early August 2014, state water supplies were at less than two-thirds 
capacity.

• The State of California has limited the amount of water users can use each day,
and there have been crackdowns on outdoor activities such as watering lawns, 
washing cars or cleaning sidewalks. Events have been cancelled because of the 
drought.

• The state’s lucrative and powerful agricultural sector has been forced to scale 
back its water use, in some places significantly, reportedly already leading to $1 
billion in financial losses.

• Concerns over water use are becoming increasingly contentious, adding to the 
national debate over corporate right and common good.

1

INITIAL DRAFT

• In January 2013, activists and farmers joined forces and came in droves from 
the Central Valley to rally on the capitol steps in Sacramento, demanding action 
as water levels dropped and anxiety levels rose.

• California residents have been asked to be vigilant and cut back on household 
water use, but only about 4 percent of California’s water footprint is individual, 
personal use. A stunning 80 percent goes to agriculture, according to a recent 
report from the NRDC and Pacific Institute, so if we really want to talk about 
drastic conservation, perhaps we should look at our food choices.

• Nestlé corporation has stated that water is a commodity to be sold on the open 
market.

The Sacramento Nestlé Problem

.

• Here in Sacramento our mayor has given Nestlé the right for pennies on 
the dollar to drain our aquifers, bottle the water and sell it back to the 
people at exorbitant profits while we are in a severe drought.

• In an outraged action request in mid-August, the League of Conservation 
Voters, a prominent national lobby group, urged 50,000 of its members and 
consumers to petition the company on the issue. “Nestlé … is bottling California’s
water, selling it, and profiting while the state suffers from a scorching, record-
breaking drought,” the groups warned in a series of emails. “Friend, we are 
fuming. To date, Nestlé has refused to acknowledge concerns about the water 
they are taking.”

• With ongoing climate change, the taking of unknown amounts of water will 
continue to cause problems and will keep us on this destructive road for the 
future.  It’s unsustainable! 

• Nestlé corporation has stated that water is a commodity to be sold on the open 
market.

The Problem with such a twisted concept such as the above is that there is a 
Lack of Oversight, a Lack of Accountability, and no Governmental Controls to 
regulate and/or limit a corporations excessive taking of water for profit, as 
Nestlé's is doing.  The food and beverage giant is king when it comes to bottled 
water -- it controls one-third of the U.S. market and sells water under 70 different 
brand names such as Arrowhead, Calistoga, Deer Park, Perrier and Poland 
Spring.

• There have been a few drinking water crises in the U.S. this year that have  
made people stop and think about where their water is coming from, but most 
people don’t give much thought to the politics behind drinking water.

2

INITIAL DRAFT

• Here in Sacramento, Mayor Kevin Johnson gave the Nestlé Corporation the 
right to drain several of our aquifers for pennies on the dollar, bottle the water, 
and then sell it back to the people at exorbitant profits. 

All of this is being done during the time of one of the most severe droughts in 
California history.  The actual breakdown of Mayor Johnson’s “sweetheart” deal is
the following:

     • The City of Sacramento via Mayor Kevin Johnson, receives: $.65 (65 
cents) per 750 gallons of water (taken by Nestlé's Water Company).

    • The City of Sacramento gets paid $186.00 per 215,000 gallons of water.

    • It works out to $2.1 million off the shelf.

    • The profit = approximately 10,000% for Nestlé's, at the City of 
Sacramento’s expense.

[Based on information and figures obtained from City Council member Kevin 
McCarty’s office]

And now, Major Kevin Johnson is campaigning for and pushing Measure L on the
November 2014 ballot, to grant him full powers as a strong mayor (the “Boss”).  
The very same Mayor Kevin Johnson involved in the “sweetheart” deal with the 
Nestlé Water Company. 

Privatizing Sacramento's water, as well as pushing the water bond (Proposition 
1) issue, and giving away parking revenue for many years to come, should not be
something that goes unquestioned by the citizens of Sacramento.

• In Southern California, there are problems with the Nestlé Corporation re 
water issues.  Nestlé's bottling operation, is located on Native American land, 
operating under a 25-year lease from the Morongo Band of Mission Indians near 
Cabazon, in the state’s arid south. Water from the area is bottled and sold under 
the brands Arrowhead and Pure Life, according to the local media investigation 
that broke the story in July. The article’s author, Ian James, pointed to federal 
data suggesting that water levels in the area have been going down by up to 4 
feet a year over the past decade.

 In part because the Morongo are a sovereign nation, Nestlé is not required to 
tell California authorities how much water its Cabazon bottling plant is extracting, 
nor does it need to confirm whether it is abiding by the state’s broader rationing 
strategy. 

• While some tribes support the privatization of water for profit, traditional tribes, 
such as the Winnemem Wintu, fought long and hard against Nestlé and Crystal 
Geyser in their communities.

3

INITIAL DRAFT

• “We’re in a very bad drought right now and it’s time to really manage our public 
water resources wisely — and Nestlé's operations are really antithetical to good 
public water management,” Adam Scow, California director for Food & Water 
Watch, a watchdog group, told MintPress.

• The state of California has no specific policy on water bottling.  With no 
oversight and no accountability, there are no governances in place to control how
much water is being taken by any of the Nestlé’ plants, anywhere.  In the third 
year of a drought, this borders on insanity.

• Several years ago, state legislators did pass legislation that would have 
required water companies to report how much water they were bottling. But that 
bill was vetoed by then-Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. Likewise, attempts to have 
the state’s water authority oversee a comprehensive mapping and analysis of the
state’s water resources — to many, a seemingly straightforward step — are again
stalled.  

• Adam Scow, also said, that the broader problem underpinning this lack of 
legislative progress is the fact that California doesn’t formally view water as a 
resource in the public trust. As a result, it’s one of the very few states lacking 
comprehensive groundwater regulations.

“Water is pretty much treated as private property, which is crazy and grossly 
irresponsible,” he said. This is due to industry opposition, largely from corporate 
agriculture, which is the big groundwater sucker in California. Most likely, the fear
is that if the public knew how much groundwater there is, there would be some 
limitations on how much water they could take.”

•  Meanwhile, the current drought affecting much of the American West could 
continue for years, or worsen in the future due to a changing climate. Last week, 
researchers at Cornell University warned that the chances of a decade-long 
drought in the Southwest are as high as 50 percent, and that the chances of a 
30-year “mega drought” are likewise anywhere from 20 to 50 percent.

Reckless Power/Corporate Greed:

• “Access to water should not be a public right.” –Peter Brabeck, Nestlé Group, 
CEO.

• It took six years for residents of the tiny town of McCloud, CA to get rid of 
Nestlé Waters North America. The water bottler had hoped to build a 1 million 
square-foot facility in the town of less than 2,000 and was given a backroom 50-
year contract (renewable for an additional 50 years) to annually take 1,250 
gallons per minute of delicious spring water from the town, hunkered in the 
shadow of Mount Shasta, and unlimited groundwater. But after years of 
opposition 
from community and environmental groups, Nestlé scrapped its plans 

4

INITIAL DRAFT

and left with its tail between its legs.  And where did they turn to next to build their
plant, why Sacramento, CA (which led us to the Kevin Johnson Nestlé deal!)

Other Issues:

• Wide spread Hydraulic Fracturing - “Fracking,” is among the most extreme 
techniques used by the oil and gas industry to extract oil and gas from hard-to-
reach places.  It involves injecting high volumes of water, toxic chemicals, sand 
and other materials deep into the ground to break up soil and rock.  The amount 
of water used in the process in California, remains unknown, and of course adds 
to the increase of massive water usage.

For a good overview of fracking and acid stimulation in California, see Robert 
Collier's series of articles published on the website of the 

Next Generation

. 

http://thenextgeneration.org/about/people/robert-collier

• The peripheral canal to be built underneath Bay Delta to take water from the 
north (the giant “Twin Tunnels” project).

Conclusion 

Solutions:

• Recognize and accept the fact that “Water is a Human Right.” This was stated 
by the United Nations which has recognized the importance of this issue, and 
thus stated: “The right to safe and clean drinking water and sanitation is a human
right that is essential for the full enjoyment of life.

• We must strengthen our public water systems.

  

“The strength of public water 

systems is their very clear mandate to provide water as a public trust and ensure 
equal access in a democratically accountable fashion,” said, Erin Diaz, a 
campaign director with Corporate Accountability International, a watchdog group. 
“That’s what’s fundamentally different from a bottling corporation coming in and 
using that resource for profit.”

• The Environmental Water Caucus (EWC) has developed a well-thought out 
comprehensive plan highlighting 15 main actions in relation to the Sacramento-
San Joaquin-San Francisco Bay Delta and Estuary.  

This Plan includes a unique combination of actions that will open the discussion 
for alternatives to the currently failed policies which continuously attempt to use 
water as though it were a limitless resource.

5

INITIAL DRAFT

For the complete Environmental Caucus reduced exports plan which includes the
15 solutions to California’s water needs,  please go to the EWC 
website: 

http://www.ewccalifornia.org/reports/REDUCEDEXPORTSPLAN.pdf

Information for this WHITE PAPER was gathered from numerous sources 
including:
• Natural Resources Defense Council
• Pacific Institute
• The League of Conservation Voters
• City Council Member Kevin McCarty’s Office
• Food & Water Watch
• Mint Press
• Cornell University
• Corporate Accountability International
• One Green Planet
• Salon.com, Lindsay Abrams
• Next Generation.org
• United Nations
• Environmental Water Caucus

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Bob Saunders

 

RSaund3980@aol.com

 

916/370-8251

 

6