ZINC MINING RAMBLINGS MODULE 10-ZINC MINING IN AFRICA AND AN ADDENDUM TO INDIA 

NOVEMBER 2016 

 

Doug Beattie, Mining Engineer (Retired) 

MODULE 10-ZINC MINING IN AFRICA AND AN ADDENDUM TO THE INDIA MODULE 

 
 
This is my tenth and final module looking at the zinc miners around the world.  This time it is Africa. 
 
The key nations or deposits that I have not had a look at are: 

  Kazakhstan (400,000 T).  Largely Glencore assets see pages   942-1634 

here

 

  Brazil (150,000 T).  Essentially Votorantim; 
  Arizona Mining’s Taylor deposit; 
  Russia (200,000 T) and the undeveloped Ozernoe deposit.    

 
I have added an addendum for India here since Vedanta stated recently that due to geotechnical issues 
they will not be taking the Rampura Agucha pit down as far as planned and this will reduce production 
from this deposit by roughly 400,000 T zinc in the 2019-2020 timeframe.  And as a wonderful Black 
Friday parting gift, at the end I discuss Bolivia’s two largest producers. 
 
Summary of Africa Zinc Mine Supply 
 
As illustrated in Table 1, zinc mine supply in Africa is set to double with new production from Bisha and 
expected mine construction and commissioning at Gamsberg and Kipushi during the study period.  The 
Skorpion and Black Mountain mines are expected to be exhausted.   
 
Table 1 Summary of Actual and Expected African Zinc Mine Production 

 

2012 

 

2013 

2014 

2015 

2016 

2017 

2018 

2019 

2020 

2021 

2022 

Bisha 

40,200 

97,500 

116,800 

121,500 

109,350 

81,000 

81,000 

B.Mountain 

38,577 

28,999 

27,022 

29,272 

30,000 

30,000 

30,000 

30,000 

20,000 

Skorpion 

145,342 

124,924 

102,188 

82,029 

90,000 

109,000 

109,000 

109,000 

100,000 

Gamsberg 

100,000 

180,000 

250,000 

250,000 

Rosh Pinah 

52,000 

52,000 

54,000 

55,500 

55,000 

55,000 

55,000 

55,000 

55,000 

55,000 

55,000 

Perkoa 

33,300 

63,400 

86,000 

83,000 

80,000 

75,000 

75,000 

75,000 

70,000 

65,000 

Morocco 

47,600 

44,200 

45,412 

45,000 

45,000 

45,000 

45,000 

45,000 

45,000 

45,000 

45,000 

Kipushi 

60,000 

180,000 

240,000 

240,000 

Other 

26,500 

20,757 

20,769 

25,000 

25,000 

25,000 

25,000 

25,000 

25,000 

25,000 

25,000 

Total 

310,019 

304,180 

312,791 

322,801 

368,200 

441,500 

455,800 

620,500 

789,350 

766,000 

761,000 
 

 
 
 

 

ZINC MINING RAMBLINGS MODULE 10-ZINC MINING IN AFRICA AND AN ADDENDUM TO INDIA 

NOVEMBER 2016 

 

Doug Beattie, Mining Engineer (Retired) 

Summary of Regions Reviewed for Mined Zinc Supply 
 
The figures for India have been adjusted based on recent news from Vedanta discussed later and African 
zinc mine supply has been added to produce the totals illustrated in Table 2 for all countries reviewed to 
date.  With the addition of Africa, zinc mine supply returns to 2015 levels in 2020 but then again begins 
a gradual decline as further mines close or reduce production. 
 
Table 2  Summary of Mined Zinc Production for the Regions Reviewed Below 
 

Mod. 

Region 

2012 

2013 

2014 

2015 

2016 

2017 

2018 

2019 

2020 

2021 

2022 

Canada 

     

622.6  

     

412.8  

     

332.5  

     

295.6  

     

316.1  

     

332.0  

     

320.0  

     

319.0  

     

264.0  

     

160.0  

     

105.0  

USA 

     

738.0  

     

774.0  

     

812.0  

     

817.0  

     

769.0  

     

751.0  

     

736.0  

     

721.0  

     

682.0  

     

662.0  

     

659.0  

India 

     

738.5  

     

764.7  

     

758.7  

     

744.2  

     

546.0  

     

854.0  

     

683.0  

     

652.0  

     

750.0 

     

729.0  

     

688.0  

Australia 

  

1,541.2  

  

1,524.5  

  

1,561.1  

  

1,547.0  

     

840.3  

     

841.8  

  

1,016.5  

  

1,078.0  

  

1,051.7  

  

1,011.0  

     

972.7  

Peru 

  

1,204.3  

  

1,262.5  

  

1,250.1  

  

1,342.0  

  

1,273.2  

  

1,408.6  

  

1,415.5  

  

1,425.0  

  

1,447.7  

  

1,416.1  

  

1,422.0  

Europe 

  

1,000.8  

     

988.3  

     

990.2  

     

907.1  

     

911.7  

     

902.0  

     

906.3  

     

931.5  

     

958.5  

     

980.5  

     

986.5  

Mexico 

     

660.3  

     

642.5  

     

659.9  

     

687.7  

     

651.1  

     

744.3  

     

784.3  

     

812.3  

     

817.3  

     

820.3  

     

824.3  

10 

Africa 

310.0 

304.2 

312.8 

322.8 

368.2 

441.5 

455.8 

620.5 

789.4 

766.0 

 

761.0 

 

  

  

6,815.7  

  

6,673.5  

  

6,677.3  

  

6,663.4  

  

5,675.6  

  

6,275.2  

  

6,317.4 

  

6,559.3  

  

6,760.6 

  

6,544.9  

  

6,418.5 

 

 

 

-2.1% 

0.1% 

-0.2% 

-14.8% 

10.6% 

0.7% 

3.8% 

3.1% 

-3.2% 

-1.9% 

 
I have therefore looked at over 80% of the zinc mines by zinc tonnage outside of China.  The only 
reliable source I have come across for Chinese data is the consulting firm Antaike ($$).  

http://www.antaike.com

 

 

 

ZINC MINING RAMBLINGS MODULE 10-ZINC MINING IN AFRICA AND AN ADDENDUM TO INDIA 

NOVEMBER 2016 

 

Doug Beattie, Mining Engineer (Retired) 

Existing Zinc Mines in Africa 
 
Nevsun Resources 
 
Bisha Mine- Eritrea   
 
Nevsun has done a good job moving the Bisha deposit along through major transitions from gold mining 
to copper mining and are now in the final transition stage to primary zinc/copper mining.  This final 
stage however is having a rough start up in the mill.   
 
The metallurgical information provided in the 2012 NI 43-101 was somewhat sketchy and acknowledged 
that there were outstanding issues related to making good copper and zinc concentrates.  But, you have 
to go back to the 2006 NI 43-101 to get good detail on the studies conducted.  Testing was conducted in 
2005 only.   
 
What AMEC discovered early on in testing was that the primary ore oxidized rapidly and this had a major 
impact upon metallurgical performance.  In order to stop the oxidation prior to lab testing they had to 
air dry the samples, put them in double heavy plastic bags in a drum that was then purged with 
nitrogen.  So, contrast this with the 2.3 million tonne stockpile of primary ore sitting on surface at Bisha 
for varying lengths of time oxidizing away recently.  Nevsun simply rediscovered what AMEC discovered 
in 2006.  You can’t make a decent copper concentrate with oxidized ore.   
 
Readers can follow the story more fully in the 2006 NI 43-101.   My intent is not to air all their dirty 
laundry here but to make a reasonable forecast of zinc output going forward. 
 
Nevsun is now milling ore fresh from the pit so the degree of oxidation occurring is being minimized.  
This should hopefully resolve their milling issues.  Unfortunately, the future of the 2.3 MT stockpile is 
uncertain.  Table 3 lists the probable reserves as reported in the 2012 NI 43-101. 

 
  Table 3 Probable Reserves for the Primary Ore as Reported in the 2012 NI 43-101 

 

Tonnes 

Zn% 

Cu% 

Au g/t 

Ag g/t 

Probable Reserves 

17,600,000 

6.54 

1.13 

0.73 

49 

 

The amount of fresh ore remaining therefore is: 

 

Classification 

Tonnes 

Probable Reserves 

17,600,000 

Milled in Q2/Q3 2016 

600,000 

Oxidized Stockpile 

2,300,000 

“Fresh” Ore Remaining 

14,700,000 

 
 

Nevsun also has a problem however coming up in their pit that they readily acknowledge.  The probable 
reserves are based on the final pit limit shown in the figure below.  They need to conduct over 20 MT of 
waste stripping a year to get to this pit bottom but have been doing less than half of this for years.  
According to the NI 43-101, “Phase 9” contains 7.8 MT of ore yet they are not conducting the waste 

ZINC MINING RAMBLINGS MODULE 10-ZINC MINING IN AFRICA AND AN ADDENDUM TO INDIA 

NOVEMBER 2016 

 

Doug Beattie, Mining Engineer (Retired) 

stripping for this phase.  What this means is that the planned pit will only access an additional ~7 MT of 
fresh primary ore so by roughly mid-2020 they will essentially have nothing fresh to mill.   

Nevsun therefore has three choices: Increase the amount of waste stripping immediately, conduct 
underground mining, or reduce the milling rate.  They have not decided what they will do here and it 
does not look like they plan to for another year or so.  This is a ticking time bomb and shareholders 
should press for an early resolution here.  In my opinion, underground mining will not provide 2 MT of 
ore a year, 1-1.2 MT a year perhaps. 

Therefore, illustrated in Table 4 is a reduction in the mines production rate starting in 2020.  Nevsun 
needs to provide better guidance here.  This table assumes they will attempt to blend some of the 
surface oxidized stockpile with an underground option post-2020.  But I could be generous here. 

Table 4  Potential Bisha Production Schedule 

Year 

Tonnes 

Grade 

Recovery 

T Zn in 

Concentrates 

2016 

1,100,000 

5.8 

63% 

40,200 

2017 

2,000,000 

6.5 

75% 

97,500 

2018 

2,000,000 

7.3 

80% 

116,800 

2019 

2,000,000 

7.5 

81% 

121,500 

2020 

1,800,000 

7.5 

81% 

109,350 

2021 

1,500,000 

7.2 

75% 

81,000 

2022 

1,500,000 

7.2 

75% 

81,000 

 

 

 

Phase 9 Pit Limit 

Phase 9 Pit Limit 

ZINC MINING RAMBLINGS MODULE 10-ZINC MINING IN AFRICA AND AN ADDENDUM TO INDIA 

NOVEMBER 2016 

 

Doug Beattie, Mining Engineer (Retired) 

 

 

 

References:   NI 43-101 Technical Reports dated  

August 31,2012 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November 15, 2006 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October 1, 2004 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

www.sedar.com

 

 

 

 

ZINC MINING RAMBLINGS MODULE 10-ZINC MINING IN AFRICA AND AN ADDENDUM TO INDIA 

NOVEMBER 2016 

 

Doug Beattie, Mining Engineer (Retired) 

Vedanta 

Vedanta acquired the Skorpion and Black Mountain mines and the undeveloped Gamsberg deposit from 
Anglo American in 2011.    Skorpion is in Namibia whereas Black Mountain and Gamsberg are near to 
each other in South Africa. 

Both Skorpion and Black Mountain are mature assets with closure of both expected during the study 
period.  Gamsberg will be ramping up production from what will ultimately be a large open pit. 

Until recently, I was scratching my head about Vedanta’s ultimate strategy here.  The Gamsberg deposit 
is well known for its high manganese content (just google “Gamsberg manganese pdf” for a sample of 
available papers).   This gums up electrolytic zinc smelters which is the key reason this orebody has not 
been developed to date.   

Until very recently the plan was to ship the manganese contaminated zinc concentrate to the soon 
exhausted Skorpion mine and refinery where it would be roasted and then made into zinc metal in the 
150,000 T a year refinery.  The capacity of the mine would therefore be dictated by the capacity of the 
refinery.   A roaster requires construction. 

My confusion was based on the fact that they are actively pre-stripping the Gamsberg open pit and 
finalizing the engineering and procurement for the Gamsberg 4 MT a year mill to produce 250,000 T of 
zinc in concentrate a year.  But no action was being taken to engineer and construct the roaster at 
Skorpion and it would be too small to take all the concentrate anyways.   

Vedanta resolved this confusion recently by stating that they will be selling the zinc concentrate from 
Gamsberg into the market and committing to a pit deepening at Skorpion to extend its mine life by 2-3 
years.  (I suspect this is all in response to the recent set back at Rampura Agucha open pit discussed as 
an Addendum to my India Module later).   

This news was quite a revelation that changes the zinc concentrate supply story markedly.  Firstly, it 
betrays the current desperation of zinc smelters to find feed.  They are willing to accept what they were 
reluctant to for the past forty years.   (Other possibilities include treatment charges plus penalties   are 
now quite reasonable and/or they intend to use some of this concentrate at their Indian smelters to 
make up for shortfalls at existing mines.)  Secondly, Gamsberg is no longer constrained production wise 
by the size of the refinery in Namibia.  Vedanta has looked at eventual milling rates up to 10 MT a year 
which would produce in excess of 500,000 T of zinc in concentrate.   

 

 

ZINC MINING RAMBLINGS MODULE 10-ZINC MINING IN AFRICA AND AN ADDENDUM TO INDIA 

NOVEMBER 2016 

 

Doug Beattie, Mining Engineer (Retired) 

Black Mountain- South Africa 

Phelps Dodge and Gold Fields developed this underground zinc/lead mine in the late 1970’s.  It was later 
acquired by Anglo American who sold it to Vedanta in 2011.  This is a deep mine with the main shaft 
down to 1,750 m.  Annual production has varied from 1.35 MT to 1.58 MT over the past five years.  
Table 5 lists recent reserves.   

 

 

         Table 5 Proven and Probable Reserves as of March 31, 2016 

 

Tonnes 

Zn% 

Pb% 

P+P Reserves 

6,900,000 

2.81 

3.00 

 

Annual mined grades are not reported but appear to be somewhat worse than reserve grades for the 
past three years when zinc in concentrate production is compared to the annual tonnage mined.  For 
2015 for instance: 

Tonnes mined:   

1,579,633 T 

Zinc in concentrate: 

29,272 T 

Recovered grade: 

29,272 T/1,579,633 T = 1.85% or 66% of reserve grade. 

Vedanta states that the mine converted last year from cut and fill mining to longhole stoping.  This could 
explain the increase in mined tonnes and decrease in grade due to higher dilution.  Predicting mine life 
here is a bit of a crapshoot.  Reserves are ample to 2020 but there are also lower grade resources.  
Reserves and resources however dropped 4.7 MT last year, or three times the rate of mining, so the 
mine appears to be at the inevitable stage of realizing much of what they have on the books is crap.  
Every mine goes through this process near the end and gradually takes the hit hoping no one notices.  
So, in Table 6 I assume 1.5 MT mined per annum at a recovered grade (after mine dilution and mill 
losses) of 2% Zn for 30,000 T zinc a year to 2021 then mine closure. 

 

Table 6  Actual and Expected Mined Zinc Production 

FY2012 

 

FY2013 

FY2014 

FY2015 

FY2016 

2016 

2017 

2018 

2019 

2020 

2021 

31,770 

 

38,577 

28,999 

27,022 

29,272 

30,000 

30,000 

30,000 

30,000 

20,000 

FY2016- financial year ending March 31,2016. 2106-2021 are calendar years. 

 

ZINC MINING RAMBLINGS MODULE 10-ZINC MINING IN AFRICA AND AN ADDENDUM TO INDIA 

NOVEMBER 2016 

 

Doug Beattie, Mining Engineer (Retired) 

 

The Headframe at Sunset 

 

 

ZINC MINING RAMBLINGS MODULE 10-ZINC MINING IN AFRICA AND AN ADDENDUM TO INDIA 

NOVEMBER 2016 

 

Doug Beattie, Mining Engineer (Retired) 

Skorpion Mine- Namibia 

Skorpion is a non-sulphide zinc deposit in Namibia that required the construction of a dedicated refinery 
to handle the unique ore type.  I looked for a very brief description of the geology and this is about the 
best I can do.  Way too many big words for mining engineers who still struggle to get their E’s pointing in 
the right direction: 

The supergene non-sulphide ores have formed by oxidation of the base metal sulphide protore by wall 
rock replacement and in-situ oxidation. The non-sulphide ore minerals comprise predominantly sauconite 
(Zn-smectite), substantial amounts of hemimorphite and smithsonite, and subordinate amounts of 
hydrozincite, tarbuttite and chalcophanite. The supergene ore minerals form mainly euhedral and 
subhedral crystals and occur as open space fillings in inter- and intragranular voids, fractures and 
breccias. The supergene non-sulphide ore body is hosted mainly by metasiliciclastic rocks, which are 
composed of meta-arkoses and –subarkoses, and subordinately by felsic metavolcanic rocks and their 
volcaniclastic equivalents. The ore body is irregularly shaped, transgressive to sedimentary layering and 
major tectonic features. It displays a relatively flattop, which is covered by a blanket of unmineralised 
overburden consisting of alluvial sediments, calcrete and Recent sand dunes. The supergene ore body is 
laterally zoned displaying a pronounced supergene lateral metal zonation pattern, which has developed 
as a result of differences in metal solubilities. Iron and copper zones represent the leached part of the 
supergene ore body that corresponds to the location of the sulphide protore. The more mobile zinc has 
precipitated away from the iron and copper zones forming a markedly supergene zinc enrichment zone. 

Us mining engineers don’t really understand geology but we do understand pictures so below is a couple 
from the open pit including a more recent photo. 

 

 

ZINC MINING RAMBLINGS MODULE 10-ZINC MINING IN AFRICA AND AN ADDENDUM TO INDIA 

NOVEMBER 2016 

 

10 

Doug Beattie, Mining Engineer (Retired) 

 

 

The mine started in 2003 with a reserve of 24.6 MT grading 10.6% Zn.  When the mine is operating at 
full capacity, roughly 1.6 MT of ore are processed annually.   The refining process comprises sulphuric 
acid atmospheric leaching, zinc solvent extraction (SX) and electrowinning (EW) to produce London 
Metal Exchange (LME) Special High Grade (SHG) zinc.  Further description of the process can be found 

here

.   

The market has been expecting the imminent closure of this mine but Vedanta committed recently to a 
pit deepening to extend the mine life “by an estimated 2 years – 3 years”.  Table 7 lists the remaining 
reserves and resources.  FY2016 production results were impacted by labour issues.  I assume that the 
commitment to pit deepening now places the resources into the reserve column and the mine will 
continue to 2020. 

Table 7 Reserves and Resources as of March 31,2016 

 

Tonnes 

Zn% 

P+P Reserves 

5,200,000 

9.00 

M+I Resources 

2,100,000 

9.59