Autonomic activity during sleep predicts memory
consolidation in humans

Lauren N. Whitehurst

a,1

, Nicola Cellini

a,b,1

, Elizabeth A. McDevitt

a

, Katherine A. Duggan

a

, and Sara C. Mednick

a,2

a

Department of Psychology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521; and

b

Department of General Psychology, University of Padua, 35131 Padua, Italy

Edited by Thomas D. Albright, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA, and approved May 6, 2016 (received for review September 12, 2015)

Throughout history, psychologists and philosophers have proposed
that good sleep benefits memory, yet current studies focusing on
the relationship between traditionally reported sleep features (e.g.,
minutes in sleep stages) and changes in memory performance show
contradictory findings. This discrepancy suggests that there are
events occurring during sleep that have not yet been considered.
The autonomic nervous system (ANS) shows strong variation
across sleep stages. Also, increases in ANS activity during waking,
as measured by heart rate variability (HRV), have been correlated
with memory improvement. However, the role of ANS in sleep-
dependent memory consolidation has never been examined. Here,
we examined whether changes in cardiac ANS activity (HRV) dur-
ing a daytime nap were related to performance on two memory
conditions (Primed and Repeated) and a nonmemory control con-
dition on the Remote Associates Test. In line with prior studies, we
found sleep-dependent improvement in the Primed condition com-
pared with the Quiet Wake control condition. Using regression
analyses, we compared the proportion of variance in performance
associated with traditionally reported sleep features (model 1) vs.
sleep features and HRV during sleep (model 2). For both the
Primed and Repeated conditions, model 2 (sleep

+ HRV) predicted

performance significantly better (73% and 58% of variance
explained, respectively) compared with model 1 (sleep only, 46%
and 26% of variance explained, respectively). These findings present
the first evidence, to our knowledge, that ANS activity may be one
potential mechanism driving sleep-dependent plasticity.

sleep

|

heart rate variability

|

memory

|

consolidation

|

vagal activity

S

leep has been shown to facilitate the transformation of recent
experiences into stable, long-term memories (i.e., consolida-

tion), and specific electrophysiological sleep features have been
implicated in this process (1). For example, minutes spent in slow
wave sleep (SWS) and the number of sleep spindles [transient
neural events in nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, 12

–15 Hz]

in a posttraining sleep period correlate with the magnitude of ex-
plicit memory improvement [e.g., conscious, episodic memories
(2, 3)]. Minutes in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, on the other
hand, are associated with improvements in implicit memory [e.g.,
unconscious, priming, procedural skills (4, 5)]. However, recent
reviews and meta-analyses of the literature report inconsistencies in
these findings (6, 7), suggesting that there may be unexplored fac-
tors critical to sleep-dependent memory consolidation.

One possible influence that has received little attention in the

sleep and memory literature is the autonomic nervous system
(ANS). This lack of attention is somewhat surprising, considering
that the literature describing ANS modulation of memory during
wake is well established (8). Studies have found that memory
storage of new information can be enhanced or impaired by di-
rectly modifying the activity of peripheral hormones following
acquisition (9, 10). Peripheral activity has been purported to affect
memory consolidation via vagal afferent nerve fibers, which
communicate information about ANS excitation and arousal via
projections to the brainstem, which then project to memory-related
areas, including the amygdala complex, hippocampus, and pre-
frontal cortex (PFC) (11). Descending projections from the PFC to
autonomic/visceral sites of the hypothalamus and brainstem create

a feedback loop allowing for bidirectional communication between
central memory areas and peripheral sites (12

–14) (Fig. 1).

Accordingly, vagus nerve lesions have been shown to impair

memory (15, 16). In rats, pairing vagal nerve stimulation with au-
ditory stimuli has been shown to reorganize neural circuits (17) and
strengthen neural response to speech sounds in the auditory cortex
(18). Also, vagal stimulation has been shown to boost neural rep-
resentations of paired movements in the motor cortex (19) and to
enhance extinction learning of fear memories (20). In humans, vagal
nerve stimulation during verbal memory consolidation enhances
recognition memory (21, 22). Together, these findings highlight
vagal activity as a possible factor influencing plasticity during waking
memory consolidation, yet the role of autonomic activity for sleep-
dependent memory consolidation has not been examined.

During sleep, fluctuations in ANS activity are traditionally mea-

sured using heart rate variability (HRV), defined as the variance
between consecutive heartbeats [RR interval (23)]. Prior studies have
established that parasympathetic/vagal activity is associated with the
high-frequency component of HRV [HF HRV; 0.15

–0.40 Hz (23)].

During SWS sleep, studies have reported a reduced heart rate (i.e., a
lengthening of RR intervals) coupled with a reduction in overall
cardiac ANS activity and a dominance of parasympathetic/vagal ac-
tivity (HF HRV) compared with wake and REM (24). In addition,
REM sleep shows both greater total ANS activity and higher para-
sympathetic/vagal activity compared with wake and SWS sleep (25).

Waking HF HRV has been associated with cognitive perfor-

mance, particularly for tasks that rely on PFC activity (26). Higher
resting HRV is associated with better working memory (27, 28),
sustained attention (29), and efficient attentional control (30).
Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, Lane et al. (31)

Significance

We present the first evidence, to our knowledge, that the auto-
nomic nervous system (ANS) plays a role in associative memory
consolidation during sleep. Compared with a Quiet Wake control
condition, performance improvement was associated with va-
gally mediated ANS activity [as measured by high-frequency (HF)
heart rate variability (HRV)] during rapid eye movement (REM)
sleep. In particular, up to 73% of the proportion of improvement
in associative memory performance could be accounted for by
considering both traditionally reported sleep features (i.e., mi-
nutes spent in sleep stages and sleep spindles) and HF HRV. We
hypothesize that central nervous system processes that favor
peripheral vagal activity during REM sleep may lead to increases
in plasticity that promote associative processing.

Author contributions: E.A.M. and S.C.M. designed research; L.N.W., E.A.M., and K.A.D.
performed research; L.N.W., N.C., K.A.D., and S.C.M. contributed new reagents/analytic
tools; L.N.W., N.C., and E.A.M. analyzed data; and L.N.W., N.C., and S.C.M. wrote the
paper.

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

This article is a PNAS Direct Submission.

1

L.N.W. and N.C. contributed equally to this work.

2

To whom correspondence should be addressed. Email: smednick@ucr.edu.

This article contains supporting information online at

www.pnas.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.

1073/pnas.1518202113/-/DCSupplemental

.

www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1518202113

PNAS Early Edition

|

1 of 6

PSYCHOL

OGICAL

AND

COGN

ITIVE

SC

IENCES

measured HF HRV during retrieval of emotional memories and
reported a positive correlation with activity of the medial PFC.
In contrast, decreased resting HF HRV is associated with poor
cognitive function and maladaptive emotional processing (14, 26).
Until now, no studies have investigated the role of HRV during
sleep for memory consolidation.

Here, we investigated the contribution of the ANS for sleep-

dependent memory consolidation by examining postnap performance
changes on the Remote Associates Test (RAT) (32), a task in which
subjects are given three words and are asked to identify a fourth
word that can be associated with the first three words. The RAT
measures creative processing and is associated with PFC activity
(33). Furthermore, distinct memory manipulations of the RAT have
been shown to rely on REM sleep (4). We tested two different types
of memory conditions adopted from Cai et al. (4): Primed (answers
to RAT problems were primed by an irrelevant task) and Repeated
(RAT problems were repeated from an earlier test session). In the
Novel condition, neither problems nor answers were seen before
test. Cai et al. (4) tested three groups, Quiet Wake, NREM nap,
and NREM

+ REM nap, on three RAT conditions. Performance in

all groups did not change in the Novel condition compared with
baseline, whereas it improved in the Repeated condition. However,
only the group with REM sleep improved in the Primed condition.
In the current study, we repeated this experimental design to in-
vestigate the relative contributions of sleep and HRV during sleep
to these memory benefits. We specifically examined sleep features

previously associated with memory consolidation, including minutes
in REM, minutes in SWS, and sleep spindles. For HRV, we focused
on the HF HRV component, which has been associated with PFC-
related cognition (34, 35). Given the prior literature on autonomic
influences on memory consolidation, and the role of REM sleep for
performance improvement on this task, we hypothesized that HF
HRV activity during REM sleep would be associated with improved
RAT performance in the Primed condition, compared with the
Repeated and Novel control conditions.

Results

HRV During a Daytime Nap Is Similar to Nocturnal Sleep.

Sleep

and HRV parameters during the nap are reported in

Tables S1

and

S2

. HRV fluctuations across the nap resembled prior reports of

cardiac ANS activity across nocturnal sleep stages (25, 36). Repeated
measures ANOVAs indicated significant differences in total HRV
spectral power across sleep stages [

F

(3,63)

= 7.78, P < 0.01, partial

eta squared (

η

2

p

)

= 0.27]. Post hoc comparisons revealed the lowest

total power occurred in SWS compared with all other sleep stages
[SWS

< stage 2 (P = 0.001), < REM (P = 0.001)]. REM sleep

showed the highest total power, which was significantly greater than
SWS (

P < 0.001). Because there were substantial decreases in total

power during SWS, we examined the percentage of total HRV
power comprised by the HF component (HF

nu

= HF[ms

2

]/

(HF[ms

2

]

+ LF[ms

2

]) * 100), where LF is the low-frequency compo-

nent (37). Here, we discovered that substantial changes also occurred
in the normalized HF HRV component [

F

(3,63)

= 12.04, P < 0.001,

η

2

p

= 0.36], with greatest normalized HF HRV during SWS compared

with stage 2 (

P < 0.003), REM (P < 0.001), and prenap wake

(

P = 0.05). Additionally, there was higher normalized HF HRV

during stage 2 compared with REM (

P = 0.045), but not compared

with prenap wake (

P = 0.10). These patterns suggest that HRV during

daytime naps is similar to HRV during nighttime sleep (25, 38), with
SWS containing the lowest total HRV, yet the highest proportion of
HF HRV compared with waking rest, stage 2, and REM.

RAT Performance.
Baseline performance.

We first compared baseline scores between

groups, but found a nonsignificant difference [

t

(54)

= 1.76, P = 0.08].

Further investigation of the baseline scores shows that mean per-
formance in the Nap group was slightly elevated (full: mean

= 0.42,

partial: mean

= 0.45; Table 1). This elevated performance in

nappers was likely due to random error, because the mean per-
formance scores at baseline in the Quiet Wake (QW) group and
the Novel condition for both nappers and QW subjects were similar
(mean scores

∼ 0.35) (Fig. 2).

Naps with REM and SWS benefit primed memory performance: Full
sample.

Next, we used a multivariate ANOVA (MANOVA) with

group (Nap and QW) as the independent variable; performance
(proportion correct at PM) in Novel, Primed, and Repeated condi-
tions as dependent variables; and baseline performance as a co-
variate. This analysis revealed a significant effect of group [

F

(3,51)

=

6.57,

P = 0.001, η

2

p

= 0.28]. In line with Cai et al. (4), a 90-min nap

with both NREM and REM sleep boosted performance in the
Primed condition [

F

(1,53)

= 13.63, P = 0.001, η

2

p

= 0.20] above QW.

No group differences were found in the Repeated [

F

(1,53)

= 0.01,

Brainstem 

NTS 

RVLM 

Autonomic 

Afferents 

Hippocampus 

Amygdala 

Medial Prefrontal 

Cortex 

Thalamus 

Hypothalamus 

Parasympathetic 

Control 

Sympathetic 

Control 

Heart Rate 

Fig. 1.

Central nervous system memory-related areas and autonomic control

of the heart. ANS fibers from major organs in the periphery, including the
heart, innervate the brainstem at the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). The
brainstem connects with the thalamus, hypothalamus, and other memory-
related areas, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and PFC. Descending
projections from the PFC to the hypothalamus and brainstem create a feed-
back loop facilitating the modulation of peripheral activity by the central
nervous system, including HRV. Lines denote bidirectional connections, and
arrows denote monodirectional projections. Note that, for clarity, we only
show a partial representation of the central autonomic network in the current
figure. RVLM, rostral ventrolateral medulla. Adapted from ref. 12.

Table 1.

Behavioral performance on the RAT: Proportion correct

Condition

QW, n

= 21

Nap, full, n

= 35

Nap, partial, n

= 17

Baseline

0.35

± 0.18

0.42

± 0.15

0.45

± 0.15

Novel

0.34

± 0.19

0.34

± 0.18

0.36

± 0.20

Primed

0.26

± 0.13

0.47

± 0.21

0.51

± 0.19

Repeated

0.40

± 0.22

0.48

± 0.16

0.51

± 0.15

Nap (full) represents the whole Nap sample. Nap (partial) represents the subset

of nap subjects used in the regression analyses. Data are reported as mean

± SD.

2 of 6

|

www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1518202113

Whitehurst et al.

P = 0.92, η

2

p

< 0.01] or Novel [F

(1,53)

= 0.87, P = 0.36, η

2

p

= 0.02]

condition. Interestingly, we noted that compared with baseline per-
formance, the QW group showed a decrease in performance in the
Primed condition [

t

(20)

= −2.63, P = 0.02], an increase in performance

in the Repeated condition [

t

(20)

= 2.06, P = 0.05], and no difference in

the Novel condition [

t

(20)

= −0.09, P = 0.93]. We hypothesize that the

decreased Primed performance may be related to an inability in
the QW group to disengage from the associations that were set up by
the analogies task, which impaired their ability to generate new as-
sociations to the primed words in the RAT task. However, more
research is required to tease apart this result. Additionally, the in-
crease in the Repeated condition is consistent with previous findings
and supports the notion that incubation of previously exposed prob-
lems may be sufficient to facilitate consolidation (4).

Naps with REM and SWS benefit primed memory performance: Partial
sample.

Due to the restrictions of HRV calculations (

SI Materials

and Methods

), we could only conduct regressions on a subset of

subjects (17 nappers). To ensure similar performance profiles as the
full sample, we tested performance differences in this partial sample.
First, we found similar nonsignificant, yet trending, baseline differ-
ences between nappers and QW in the partial sample [

t

(36)

= 1.85,

P = 0.07]. Next, we used a MANOVA on group (Nap and QW) and
performance (proportion correct at PM) in Novel, Primed, and
Repeated conditions, again controlling for baseline performance.
This analysis revealed a significant effect of condition [

F

(3,33)

= 6.66,

P = 0.001, η

2

p

= 0.38]. Similar to the full sample, analyses revealed a

90-min nap with both NREM and REM sleep boosted performance
in the Primed condition [

F

(1,35)

= 16.08, P < 0.001, η

2

p

= 0.31] above

QW. Neither the Repeated condition [

F

(1,35)

= 0.04, P = 0.84,

η

2

p

= 0.001] nor the Novel condition [F

(1,35)

= 0.79, P = 0.38, η

2

p

=

0.02] differed for nappers and QW.

HRV during Quiet Wake is not associated with performance.

No signifi-

cant correlations were revealed between HF HRV in the Quiet
Wake condition and performance [Novel: Pearson correlation co-
efficient (

r) = −0.17, P = 0.48; Primed: r = −0.28, P = 0.23; Re-

peated:

r = 0.006, P = 0.98].

Sleep and HRV do not predict novel performance.

Using a regression

framework, we examined the amount of performance change
(computed as proportion correct PM

− proportion correct AM/

proportion correct AM * 100; Table 2 and

SI Materials and

Methods

in each condition accounted for by the sleep predictors

in model 1, as well as the sleep and HRV predictors in model 2.
Bivariate relationships between each predictor and the outcomes
are reported in

Table S3

For the Novel condition, sleep variables

did not significantly predict performance in model 1 [

F

(3,13)

= 0.89,

P = 0.47]. After adding the HRV variables in model 2, this model was
still not significant [

F

(5,11)

= 1.86, P = 0.18; Fig. 3A and

Table S4

].

These results agree with and extend previous findings demonstrating
that native creative abilities are not modulated by sleep (4) or
HRV during sleep.

Sleep and HRV predict primed performance.

For the Primed condition,

the set of sleep variables in model 1 accounted for 46% of the
variance in postnap performance [adjusted (Adj)

R

2

= 0.46, F

(3, 13)

=

5.47,

P = 0.012; Fig. 3], with REM minutes (β = −0.55, P = 0.01)

and sleep spindles (

β = 0.51, P = 0.02) emerging as significant pre-

dictors, whereas time spent in SWS was not a significant predictor
(

β = −0.06, P = 0.77;

Table S4

). When we added the HRV variables

in model 2, the variance accounted for by the model significantly
increased from 46% to 73% [Adj

R

2

= 0.73, F

(5,11)

= 9.76, P = 0.001],

with REM minutes (

β = −0.51, P = 0.007) remaining a strong pre-

dictor, as well as HF HRV during REM (

β = 0.51, P = 0.006; Fig.

3

B). After accounting for ANS activity, sleep spindles decreased in

significance (

β = 0.32, P = 0.063). Interestingly, REM minutes were

negatively related to performance in both model 1 (sleep variables)
and model 2 (sleep and HRV variables). In contrast, higher HF
HRV during REM predicted better performance. We further ex-
plored this apparent inverse relationship between HRV and REM
sleep by testing if these factors are inversely related to each other
using a Pearson correlation coefficient. We found that REM minutes
and HF HRV during REM were not significantly correlated (

r =

0.01,

P = 0.99), which suggests independence between these two

variables. These findings demonstrate a role for ANS activity
during sleep in predicting memory consolidation and suggest sep-
arable contributions from sleep and HF HRV during sleep for
sleep-dependent memory consolidation.

Sleep and HRV predict repeated performance.

In the Repeated condi-

tion, model 1 (sleep variables) accounted for a marginally signifi-
cant amount (26%) of the variance in performance [Adj

R

2

=

0.26,

F

(3, 13)

= 2.89, P = 0.08], with sleep spindles as the only

significant contributor to this model (

β = 0.47, P = 0.05).

However, model 2 (sleep and HRV variables) significantly
increased the variance explained to 58% [Adj

R

2

= 0.58, F

(5,11)

=

5.47,

P = 0.009]. Here, sleep spindles were no longer a significant

contributor (

β = 0.24, P = 0.24). Instead, HF HRV during REM

was a predictor (

β = 0.54, P = 0.02). Again, similar to the Primed

condition, greater HF HRV during REM was associated with
better performance. Our model 1 result is consistent with previous
literature implicating sleep spindles as a marker of explicit memory
consolidation (39). However, model 2 suggests HF HRV may be an
even better predictor of explicit memory improvement, implicating
previously unidentified avenues of research into how autonomic
fluctuations interact with known markers of sleep-dependent plas-
ticity. Interestingly, here and in the study by Cai et al. (4), sleep and
quiet wake both contributed to increased performance in the Re-
peated condition. It is therefore possible that two parallel mecha-
nisms may facilitate performance improvement in the explicit
memory condition, one during a quiet wake episode involving re-
hearsal or rumination on the RAT items, and the other involving
memory reactivation processes during sleep. This idea is consistent
with the hypothesis that declarative memories consolidate in an

Table 2.

Behavioral performance on the RAT: Percent change

Condition

QW, n

= 21

Nap, full, n

= 35

Nap, partial, n

= 17

Novel

3.66

± 56.21

−13.36 ± 51.66

−17.91 ± 39.60

Primed

−4.81 ± 46.76

20.22

± 70.39

26.71

± 68.82

Repeated

11.89

± 40.73

17.61

± 33.23

17.84

± 31.55

Nap (full) represents the whole Nap sample. Nap (partial) represents the subset

of nap subjects used in the regression analyses. Data are reported as mean

± SD.

Fig. 2.

Sleep boosts performance in the Primed condition on the RAT. Primed

associative memories on the RAT were enhanced after a nap that included both
NREM and REM sleep, but not after a period of QW. No improvement was seen
the Nap group in the Novel or Repeated condition compared with QW, al-
though in the Repeated condition, the Nap group nominally performed better
than the QW group. Note that these results are in line with previous research (4).
Error bars represent

±1 SEM. Asterisks represent significance at P < 0.05.

Whitehurst et al.

PNAS Early Edition

|

3 of 6

PSYCHOL

OGICAL

AND

COGN

ITIVE

SC

IENCES

opportunistic manner (40), such as in times of low external input
(i.e., during a quiet wake period or during sleep), as has been shown in
auditory tone sequence learning (41), visual search (42), and pursuit
motor tasks (43). In contrast, some nondeclarative information, such
as our Primed condition here, mainly rely on sleep processes (5, 44,
45). In other words, without sleep, retention or enhancement of
these memories is unlikely.

Discussion
Here, we present the first evidence, to our knowledge, that the ANS
plays a significant and substantial role in associative memory con-
solidation during sleep. We showed that vagally mediated ANS
activity during sleep (

i) is associated with the consolidation of im-

plicit and explicit information and (

ii) is stage specific. Additionally,

the combination of sleep features and HF HRV during REM sleep
accounted for up to 73% of the variance in associative memory
enhancement. Although SWS was not a significant predictor of
performance, sleep spindles contributed to performance benefits in
model 1 in both Primed and Repeated conditions, and this result
extends previous research implicating sleep spindles in explicit
verbal memory consolidation (3, 46) and suggests a role for
spindles in predicting implicit memory performance (47) as well.
However, after the addition of HF HRV in model 2, the con-
tribution of sleep spindles was reduced in both Repeated and
Primed models. In fact, HF HRV during REM was the only
consistent predictor across both models. Specifically, HF HRV
during REM sleep was a positive predictor of RAT performance
in the Primed and Repeated conditions, whereas time spent in
REM sleep was negatively associated with Primed memory
performance. We did not find a relationship between ANS

activity during wake and any of the memory conditions, or with
ANS activity during sleep and the Novel condition, suggesting a
specific effect of ANS activity with sleep-related consolidation and
not with a general improvement of creative ability. Together, these
findings demonstrate a role for ANS activity during sleep in pre-
dicting memory-related associative processing and highlight a disso-
ciation between time spent in REM sleep and vagal activity during
REM sleep for sleep-dependent, associative memory consolidation.

Indeed, REM sleep was a negative predictor for Primed perfor-

mance. This result could be related to several factors. Some subjects
had atypically long durations of REM sleep. On average, a 90-min
nap will typically comprise about 15

–20 min of REM sleep (5, 48,

49). REM varied greatly across our subjects (1.5

–38.5 min). Thus,

one possible explanation for the negative relationship between REM
and performance may be that REM sleep has a dose-dependent
effect on cognitive outcomes such that too much REM may be at a
cost to NREM sleep, disrupting circadian and homeostatic patterns
(50) and, potentially, memory performance. One way to test this
hypothesis would be to manipulate the timing of the nap to modu-
late the duration of REM sleep experimentally (e.g., early morning
naps vs. late afternoon naps) and compare performance across these
different nap conditions. Another explanation that lends itself to the
current data is that increased REM sleep was associated with in-
creased forgetting, and therefore worse memory, in the Primed
condition. Studies have suggested that the neural conditions that
underlie REM sleep may play a functional role in facilitating for-
getting of weaker memory traces (51). In the current dataset, asso-
ciations initiated during the analogy task may have instantiated
weaker memories that were downscaled during REM sleep (52),
resulting in the inverse relationship between REM sleep and per-
formance indicated in the current study. Other experimental tech-
niques, such as intracranial recordings in humans to assess
electrophysiological events like pontine-geniculate-occipital waves
during REM sleep (53), may be necessary to reveal relationships
between complex performance outcomes and underlying neural
mechanisms. Taken together, the negative relationship with per-
formance suggests that there may be several heretofore unconsidered
factors responsible for REM-dependent memory consolidation.

Despite the negative association between time in REM and

performance, naps with NREM and REM sleep were favorable for
using primed words to solve creative problems, which is in line with
our prior work (4); in both studies, these naps provided

∼40%

improvement in the Primed condition compared with the Novel
condition. It is also important to note that the regression analyses
revealed that REM sleep accounted for a greater amount of var-
iance compared with all other sleep features. This result suggests
that REM sleep offers a unique opportunity for highly associative
processing. Creativity and associative thinking have been thought
to require the formation of

“associative elements into new com-

binations, which either meet specified requirements or are in some
way useful

” (32). This leap away from existing associations has

been hypothesized to require changes to memory that involve the
disintegration of existing schemas to ignite new and useful com-
binations (54). REM sleep may facilitate schema disintegration
due to its highly associative nature. In the current study, REM
sleep may have facilitated subjects

’ ability to break the schematic

relationship between words presented as analogies and enhanced
their ability to use the analogy answers in a new and useful way to
complete the unrelated RAT problems. In contrast, without sleep,
subjects may have had difficulty in breaking with the associations
set up by the analogies task, and thus showed decreased ability to
use the primed words in the subsequent creativity task.

This highly associative nature of REM sleep is likely supported by

related increases in plasticity-related neuromodulators during
REM. The neuromodulator profile of REM sleep reveals a pow-
erful boost in acetylcholine, combined with a diminished role of
norepinephrine and serotonin (55). In fact, REM sleep has been
shown to have the highest levels of cortical acetylcholine compared

Variance Explained 

Variance Unexplained 

 Novel 

 Primed 

 Repeated 

Model 1 

(Sleep) 

Model 2 

(Sleep & HF HR

V) 

A

B

C

Fig. 3.

Proportion of variance in associative memory improvement accounted

for by sleep and autonomic activity during sleep. We used regression analyses
to measure the amount of variance accounted for in postnap performance
improvement by sleep alone (model 1) and sleep

+ HF HRV during sleep

(model 2). (A) The Novel condition showed no benefits from a nap (Fig. 2), and
neither model accounted for a significant amount of variance in performance
(model 1: Adj R

2

= −0.02, P = 0.47; model 2: Adj R

2

= 0.21, P = 0.18; negative

variance indicated by counterclockwise angle meter). (B) In the Primed con-
dition, which showed significant increases in postnap performance, autonomic
activity played a significant role in sleep-dependent consolidation. Specifically,
sleep alone (SWS minutes, REM minutes, and sleep spindles) significantly
predicted improvement (model 1: Adj R

2

= 0.46, P = 0.01), but sleep plus HF

HRV predicted a greater amount of behavioral change (model 2: Adj R

2

= 0.73,

P

= 0.001). (C) In the Repeated condition, sleep alone predicted a portion of

performance change (model 1: Adj R

2

= 0.26, P = 0.07), whereas sleep + HF

HRV significantly increased the amount of variance accounted for in perfor-
mance change (model 2: Adjusted R

2

= 0.58, P = 0.009).

4 of 6

|

www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1518202113

Whitehurst et al.

with active wake, quiet wake, and NREM sleep (56

–59). Acetyl-

choline allows for induction and maintenance of long-term poten-
tiation (60, 61), which is considered a possible mechanism of
synaptic plasticity in implicit learning (62). This period of high
plasticity and low sensory input (sleep) may situate REM sleep as a
brain state optimized for making connections between disparate
ideas, which is a principal definition of creativity (32).

Importantly, animal studies have shown that stimulating

the vagus nerve leads to a release of plasticity-related neuro-
modulators in the brain, including acetylcholine and norepineph-
rine (63). Release of these neuromodulators has been assumed to
underlie the augmentation in learning associated with vagal nerve
stimulation during wake (17, 19, 21). Furthermore, central-acting
cholinergic antagonists have been shown to block vagus nerve en-
hancement of neural synchronicity and plasticity effectively (63).
However, no vagal nerve stimulation studies in humans or animals
have investigated vagal stimulation in brain states outside of wake.
Our study suggests that REM sleep, a period of high acetylcholine
(but low norepinephrine) and vagal activity, may be a brain state
optimally positioned to enhance plasticity. In this view, HRV may be
a proxy measure of the level of these ongoing plasticity processes.

The current results complement the neurovisceral integration

model (12, 14), which posits that constant dialogue between cardiac
and central brain structures (e.g., PFC, amygdala), via vagal affer-
ents, modulates cognitive and emotional processing (14, 35).
Indeed, during wake, the PFC integrates sensory, limbic, and
autonomic information (64), and HRV is proposed to be an index of
this activity (35). We believe that the consideration of sleep within
this framework of sleep-dependent consolidation of long-term
memories via hippocampal-PFC dialogue could be an important
addition to this model (Fig. 1). Specifically, during REM sleep, the
PFC shows increased neural activity compared with other sleep
stages (65). Additionally, the interactions between medial PFC and
the hippocampus during offline consolidation periods seem to play a
critical role in the integration and reorganization of new information
into preexisting knowledge networks (66). Further, during REM
sleep, there is an increase in overall cardiac autonomic activity (24)
accompanied by an increase in central control of cardiac regulatory
patterns compared with NREM sleep (67). This pattern of activity
leads us to speculate that central or peripheral conditions that affect
HRV may also influence memory consolidation during sleep, and
HF HRV may be an index of these processes.

One primary limitation of this study is the reduction in subject

numbers for our regression analyses due to HRV methodological
constraints. Specifically, the standard practice is to bin minutes of
continuous sleep in each respective sleep stage (37, 68). Previous
work from our group has shown that in daytime naps, 5-min bins
produce a reliable measure of HRV across nap periods with similar
HRV profiles to nighttime sleep (38). Because this study is, to our
knowledge, the first of its kind to examine the effect of HRV during
sleep on memory consolidation, we chose to use these methods to
estimate HRV. Due to the large amount of sleep transitions present
in a daytime nap, this approach limits the total amount of data
available for the regression analyses. Specifically, subjects may have
SWS or REM sleep in their nap, allowing us to include them in the

behavioral analyses; however, 5 min of undisturbed sleep in each
sleep stage is not as common in daytime naps and confines the total
sample considerably. To retain more statistical power, future studies
should explore these relationships in a nocturnal sleep paradigm.
Another drawback of the current study is the lack of NREM-only
naps available for analysis (

n = 8). As such, we were unable to ex-

amine the added benefit of REM sleep directly and reliably above
and beyond NREM sleep only. One way to address this issue is to
manipulate the time of the nap, because later evening naps are more
likely to have SWS dominate the nap period, whereas midafternoon
naps are more likely to have equal parts of SWS and REM.

In summary, the current study presents a novel research di-

rection in which both central and peripheral states are considered
when examining memory consolidation during sleep. We propose
that during sleep, the central nervous system and ANS commu-
nicate bidirectionally and that the neural dynamics of the REM
brain combine with increased parasympathetic activity to create
an optimized internal environment, specific to REM sleep, that
promotes creative associative memory processing.

Materials and Methods

Eighty-one healthy, nonsmoking participants (age

= 21.79 ± 3.29 y, 31 females)

with no personal history of neurological, psychological, or other chronic illness
provided informed consent, which was approved by the University of Cal-
ifornia, Riverside Human Research Review Board. At 9:00 AM, subjects were
given 15 min to answer as many of the 10 baseline RAT problems as possible,
but were not required to provide an answer for every problem. For each
problem, the subject has to combine or relate the three words drawn from
mutually remote associative clusters (e.g., COOKIES, SIXTEEN, HEART: ______).
The subject is required to find a fourth word that serves as an associative link
between these three words. The answer to this example problem is SWEET (e.g.,
cookies are sweet, sweet sixteen, sweetheart). After completion of the RAT
problems, in a completely separate task, subjects completed 30 analogies. At
1:30 PM, Nap subjects (n

= 60) took a polysomnographically recorded nap for

∼90 min. In the QW group (n = 21), subjects were attached to electroenceph-
alographic electrodes and watched a nature videotape lasting 50 min while
lying in bed. At 5:00 PM, subjects returned to the laboratory and were tested on
30 RAT problems with a time limit of 40 min. Ten problems were exactly the
same as the AM baseline RAT problems (Repeated condition), 10 problems had
the same answers as 10 (out of 30) of the AM analogies (Primed condition), and
10 problems were completely novel (Novel condition). We analyzed HRV of the
R-waves series across the whole sleep/wake period using Kubios HRV Analysis
Software 2.0 (MATLAB), according to the Task Force of the European Society of
Cardiology and North American Society of Pacing and Electrophysiology
guidelines (66). Fast Fourier transformation quantified the absolute spectral
power in the HF (0.15

–0.40 Hz) and LF bands (0.004–0.15 Hz) and total power

(measured in square milliseconds). We used a MANOVA to compare perfor-
mance (proportion correct at test) between Nap and QW groups in all three
RAT conditions: Novel, Primed, and Repeated. Tukey

’s honest significant dif-

ference (HSD) tests with Bonferroni corrections were used for all post hoc
comparisons and

η

2

p

is reported for effect size. Pearson correlations were used

to examine the bivariate relationship between HF HRV during sleep, minutes in
each sleep stage, sleep spindles, and all performance conditions. Multiple linear
regression analyses were used to develop models that could predict perfor-
mance change on each RAT condition from sleep parameters and HF HRV
during sleep.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. In memoriam, Sarnoff A. Mednick, PhD and Dr. Med.

1. Rasch B, Born J (2013) About sleep

’s role in memory. Physiol Rev 93(2):681–766.

2. Clemens Z, Fabó D, Halász P (2005) Overnight verbal memory retention correlates

with the number of sleep spindles. Neuroscience 132(2):529

–535.

3. Schabus M, et al. (2006) Sleep spindle-related activity in the human EEG and its re-

lation to general cognitive and learning abilities. Eur J Neurosci 23(7):1738

–1746.

4. Cai DJ, Mednick SA, Harrison EM, Kanady JC, Mednick SC (2009) REM, not incubation,

improves creativity by priming associative networks. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 106(25):
10130

–10134.

5. Mednick S, Nakayama K, Stickgold R (2003) Sleep-dependent learning: A nap is as

good as a night. Nat Neurosci 6(7):697

–698.

6. Genzel L, Spoormaker VI, Konrad BN, Dresler M (2015) The role of rapid eye movement

sleep for amygdala-related memory processing. Neurobiol Learn Mem 122:110

–121.

7. Pan SC, Rickard TC (2015) Sleep and motor learning: Is there room for consolidation?

Psychol Bull 141(4):812

–834.

8. McGaugh JL (2013) Making lasting memories: Remembering the significant. Proc Natl

Acad Sci USA 110(Suppl 2):10402

–10407.

9. Gold PE, Van Buskirk R (1976) Enhancement and impairment of memory processes

with post-trial injections of adrenocorticotrophic hormone. Behav Biol 16(4):387

–400.

10. Introini-Collison IB, McGaugh JL (1987) Naloxone and

β-endorphin alter the effects of

post-training epinephrine on memory. Psychopharmacology (Berl) 92(2):229

–235.

11. Packard MG, Williams CL, Cahill L, McGaugh JL (1995) The anatomy of a memory

modulatory system: From periphery to brain. Neurobehavioral Plasticity: Learning, De-
velopment, and Response to Brain Insults, eds Spear NE, Spear LP, Woodruff ML (Law-
rence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., Hillsdale, NJ), pp 149

–184.

12. Thayer JF, Lane RD (2009) Claude Bernard and the heart-brain connection: Further

elaboration of a model of neurovisceral integration. Neurosci Biobehav Rev 33(2):81

–88.

13. Vertes RP (2006) Interactions among the medial prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and mid-

line thalamus in emotional and cognitive processing in the rat. Neuroscience 142(1):1

–20.

Whitehurst et al.

PNAS Early Edition

|

5 of 6

PSYCHOL

OGICAL

AND

COGN

ITIVE

SC

IENCES

14. Thayer JF, Lane RD (2000) A model of neurovisceral integration in emotion regulation

and dysregulation. J Affect Disord 61(3):201

–216.

15. Williams C, Jensen R (1991) Vagal afferents: A possible mechanism for the modulation

of memory by peripherally acting agents. Peripheral Signaling of the Brain in Neural-
Immune and Cognitive Function, eds Frederickson R, McGaugh J, Felton D (Hogrefe
and Huber, Toronto), pp 467

–472.

16. Williams CL, Jensen RA (1993) Effects of vagotomy on Leu-enkephalin-induced

changes in memory storage processes. Physiol Behav 54(4):659

–663.

17. Engineer ND, et al. (2011) Reversing pathological neural activity using targeted

plasticity. Nature 470(7332):101

–104.

18. Engineer CT, Engineer ND, Riley JR, Seale JD, Kilgard MP (2015) Pairing Speech Sounds

With Vagus Nerve Stimulation Drives Stimulus-specific Cortical Plasticity. Brain
Stimulat 8(3):637

–644.

19. Porter BA, et al. (2012) Repeatedly pairing vagus nerve stimulation with a movement

reorganizes primary motor cortex. Cereb Cortex 22(10):2365

–2374.

20. Peña DF, Engineer ND, McIntyre CK (2013) Rapid remission of conditioned fear ex-

pression with extinction training paired with vagus nerve stimulation. Biol Psychiatry
73(11):1071

–1077.

21. Clark KB, Naritoku DK, Smith DC, Browning RA, Jensen RA (1999) Enhanced recognition

memory following vagus nerve stimulation in human subjects. Nat Neurosci 2(1):94

–98.

22. Ghacibeh GA, Shenker JI, Shenal B, Uthman BM, Heilman KM (2006) The influence of

vagus nerve stimulation on memory. Cogn Behav Neurol 19(3):119

–122.

23. Berntson GG, et al. (1997) Heart rate variability: Origins, methods, and interpretive

caveats. Psychophysiology 34(6):623

–648.

24. Trinder J, Waloszek J, Woods MJ, Jordan AS (2012) Sleep and cardiovascular regula-

tion. Pflugers Arch 463(1):161

–168.

25. Bu

šek P, Vanková J, Opavský J, Salinger J, Nevsímalová S (2005) Spectral analysis of

the heart rate variability in sleep. Physiol Res 54(4):369

–376.

26. Thayer JF, Åhs F, Fredrikson M, Sollers JJ, 3rd, Wager TD (2012) A meta-analysis of

heart rate variability and neuroimaging studies: Implications for heart rate variability
as a marker of stress and health. Neurosci Biobehav Rev 36(2):747

–756.

27. Cellini N, de Zambotti M, Covassin N, Sarlo M, Stegagno L (2014) Working memory im-

pairment and cardiovascular hyperarousal in young primary insomniacs. Psychophysiology
51(2):206

–214.

28. Hansen AL, Johnsen BH, Thayer JF (2003) Vagal influence on working memory and

attention. Int J Psychophysiol 48(3):263

–274.

29. Luque-Casado A, Zabala M, Morales E, Mateo-March M, Sanabria D (2013) Cognitive per-

formance and heart rate variability: The influence of fitness level. PLoS One 8(2):e56935.

30. Park G, Vasey MW, Van Bavel JJ, Thayer JF (2013) Cardiac vagal tone is correlated with

selective attention to neutral distractors under load. Psychophysiology 50(4):398

–406.

31. Lane RD, et al. (2009) Neural correlates of heart rate variability during emotion.

Neuroimage 44(1):213

–222.

32. Mednick SA (1962) The associative basis of the creative process. Psychol Rev 69(3):220

–232.

33. Razumnikova OM (2007) Creativity related cortex activity in the remote associates

task. Brain Res Bull 73(1-3):96

–102.

34. Cellini N, et al. (2015) Heart rate variability helps tracking time more accurately. Brain

Cogn 101:57

–63.

35. Thayer JF, Hansen AL, Saus-Rose E, Johnsen BH (2009) Heart rate variability, prefrontal

neural function, and cognitive performance: The neurovisceral integration perspective
on self-regulation, adaptation, and health. Ann Behav Med 37(2):141

–153.

36. de Zambotti M, et al. (2014) Nocturnal cardiac autonomic profile in young primary

insomniacs and good sleepers. Int J Psychophysiol 93(3):332

–339.

37. Camm AJ, et al.; Task Force of the European Society of Cardiology and the North

American Society of Pacing and Electrophysiology (1996) Heart rate variability: Standards
of measurement, physiological interpretation and clinical use. Circulation 93(5):1043

–1065.

38. Cellini N, Whitehurst LN, McDevitt EA, Mednick SC (2016) Heart rate variability

during daytime naps in healthy adults: Autonomic profile and short-term reliability.
Psychophysiology 53(4):473

–481.

39. Schabus M, et al. (2004) Sleep spindles and their significance for declarative memory

consolidation. Sleep 27(8):1479

–1485.

40. Mednick SC, Cai DJ, Shuman T, Anagnostaras S, Wixted JT (2011) An opportunistic

theory of cellular and systems consolidation. Trends Neurosci 34(10):504

–514.

41. Gottselig JM, et al. (2004) Sleep and rest facilitate auditory learning. Neuroscience

127(3):557

–561.

42. Mednick SC, Makovski T, Cai DJ, Jiang YV (2009) Sleep and rest facilitate implicit

memory in a visual search task. Vision Res 49(21):2557

–2565.

43. Rieth CA, Cai DJ, McDevitt EA, Mednick SC (2010) The role of sleep and practice in

implicit and explicit motor learning. Behav Brain Res 214(2):470

–474.

44. Wagner U, Gais S, Haider H, Verleger R, Born J (2004) Sleep inspires insight. Nature

427(6972):352

–355.

45. McDevitt EA, Duggan KA, Mednick SC (2015) REM sleep rescues learning from in-

terference. Neurobiol Learn Mem 122:51

–62.

46. Mednick SC, et al. (2013) The critical role of sleep spindles in hippocampal-dependent

memory: a pharmacology study. J Neurosci 33(10):4494

–4504.

47. Weber FD, Wang J-Y, Born J, Inostroza M (2014) Sleep benefits in parallel implicit and

explicit measures of episodic memory. Learn Mem 21(4):190

–198.

48. Borbély AA, Achermann P (1999) Sleep homeostasis and models of sleep regulation.

J Biol Rhythms 14(6):557

–568.

49. Carskadon MA, Dement WC (2011) Normal human sleep: An overview. Principles and

Practice of Sleep Medicine (Elsevier Saunders, St. Louis, MO), 5th Ed, pp 17

–26.

50. Achermann P, Borbély AA (1992) Combining different models of sleep regulation.

J Sleep Res 1(2):144

–147.

51. Walker R, Russo V (2004) Memory consolidation and forgetting during sleep: A neural

network model. Neural Process Lett 19(2):147

–156.

52. Born J, Feld GB (2012) Sleep to upscale, sleep to downscale: Balancing homeostasis

and plasticity. Neuron 75(6):933

–935.

53. Datta S, O

’Malley MW (2013) Fear extinction memory consolidation requires poten-

tiation of pontine-wave activity during REM sleep. J Neurosci 33(10):4561

–4569.

54. Landmann N, et al. (2014) The reorganisation of memory during sleep. Sleep Med Rev

18(6):531

–541.

55. Stickgold R (2013) Parsing the role of sleep in memory processing. Curr Opin

Neurobiol 23(5):847

–853.

56. Hasselmo ME, McGaughy J (2004) High acetylcholine levels set circuit dynamics for

attention and encoding and low acetylcholine levels set dynamics for consolidation.
Prog Brain Res 145:207

–231.

57. Jasper HH, Tessier J (1971) Acetylcholine liberation from cerebral cortex during par-

adoxical (REM) sleep. Science 172(3983):601

–602.

58. Kametani H, Kawamura H (1990) Alterations in acetylcholine release in the rat hippo-

campus during sleep-wakefulness detected by intracerebral dialysis. Life Sci 47(5):421

–426.

59. Marrosu F, et al. (1995) Microdialysis measurement of cortical and hippocampal acetyl-

choline release during sleep-wake cycle in freely moving cats. Brain Res 671(2):329

–332.

60. Hasselmo ME, Bower JM (1993) Acetylcholine and memory. Trends Neurosci 16(6):

218

–222.

61. Matsukawa M, et al. (1997) Serotonin and acetylcholine are crucial to maintain hip-

pocampal synapses and memory acquisition in rats. Neurosci Lett 230(1):13

–16.

62. Sale A, et al. (2011) Visual perceptual learning induces long-term potentiation in the

visual cortex. Neuroscience 172:219

–225.

63. Nichols JA, et al. (2011) Vagus nerve stimulation modulates cortical synchrony and ex-

citability through the activation of muscarinic receptors. Neuroscience 189:207

–214.

64. Groenewegen HJ, Uylings HB (2000) The prefrontal cortex and the integration of

sensory, limbic and autonomic information. Prog Brain Res 126:3

–28.

65. Hobson JA (2009) REM sleep and dreaming: Towards a theory of protoconsciousness.

Nat Rev Neurosci 10(11):803

–813.

66. Preston AR, Eichenbaum H (2013) Interplay of hippocampus and prefrontal cortex in

memory. Curr Biol 23(17):R764

–R773.

67. Chouchou F, Desseilles M (2014) Heart rate variability: A tool to explore the sleeping

brain? Front Neurosci 8:402.

68. Trinder J, et al. (2001) Autonomic activity during human sleep as a function of time

and sleep stage. J Sleep Res 10(4):253

–264.

69. Rechtschaffen A, Kales A (1968) A Manual of Standardized Terminology, Techniques

and Scoring System for Sleep Stages of Human Subjects (Natl Inst Neurological Dis-
eases and Blindness, Bethesda).

70. Wamsley EJ, et al. (2012) Reduced sleep spindles and spindle coherence in schizophrenia:

Mechanisms of impaired memory consolidation? Biol Psychiatry 71(2):154

–161.

71. Mölle M, Bergmann TO, Marshall L, Born J (2011) Fast and slow spindles during the

sleep slow oscillation: Disparate coalescence and engagement in memory processing.
Sleep 34(10):1411

–1421.

72. Schabus M, et al. (2007) Hemodynamic cerebral correlates of sleep spindles during

human non-rapid eye movement sleep. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104(32):13164

–13169.

73. Zeitlhofer J, et al. (1997) Topographic distribution of sleep spindles in young healthy

subjects. J Sleep Res 6(3):149

–155.

6 of 6

|

www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1518202113

Whitehurst et al.