q American Association on Mental Retardation

417

VOLUME

110,

NUMBER

6: 417–438

z

NOVEMBER

2005

AMERICAN JOURNAL ON MENTAL RETARDATION

Intensive Behavioral Treatment for Children With
Autism: Four-Year Outcome and Predictors

Glen O. Sallows and Tamlynn D. Graupner
Wisconsin Early Autism Project (Madison)

Abstract
Twenty-four children with autism were randomly assigned to a clinic-directed group, rep-
licating the parameters of the early intensive behavioral treatment developed at UCLA, or
to a parent-directed group that received intensive hours but less supervision by equally
well-trained supervisors. Outcome after 4 years of treatment, including cognitive, language,
adaptive, social, and academic measures, was similar for both groups. After combining
groups, we found that 48% of all children showed rapid learning, achieved average post-
treatment scores, and at age 7, were succeeding in regular education classrooms. Treatment
outcome was best predicted by pretreatment imitation, language, and social responsiveness.
These results are consistent with those reported by Lovaas and colleagues (Lovaas, 1987;
McEachin, Smith, & Lovaas, 1993).

Behavioral approaches for addressing the de-

lays and deficits common in autism have been
recognized by many as the most effective treat-
ment methods to date (Green, 1996; Maine Ad-
ministrators of Service for Children With Dis-
abilities, 2000; New York State Department of
Health, 1999; Schreibman, 1988; Smith, 1993).
The intervention developed at UCLA in the
1960s and 1970s is perhaps the best known and
best documented (e.g., Dawson & Osterling,
1997; Green, 1996; Smith, 1993). Building on ear-
lier research (e.g., Lovaas, Koegel, Simmons, &
Long, 1973), Lovaas and staff of the UCLA
Young Autism Project (1970 to 1984) began treat-
ment with children under 4 years of age using a
curriculum emphasizing language development,
social interaction, and school integration skills.
After 2 to 3 years of treatment, 47% of the exper-
imental group (9 of 19 children) versus 2% of the
comparison group (1 of 40 children) were report-
ed to have achieved ‘‘normal functioning’’ (Lo-
vaas, 1987; McEachin et al., 1993).

These findings demonstrated that many chil-

dren with autism could make dramatic improve-
ment, even achieve ‘‘normalcy,’’ and many re-

searchers now agree that intensive behavioral
treatment can result in substantial gains for a large
proportion of children (e.g., Harris, Handleman,
Gordon, Kristoff, & Fuentes, 1991; Mundy, 1993).
However, the UCLA findings also created consid-
erable controversy, and the studies were criticized
on methodological and other grounds (e.g.,
Gresham & MacMillan, 1998; Schopler, Short, &
Mesibov, 1989). One criticism was that the UCLA
group used the term recovered to describe children
who had achieved IQ in the average range and
placement in regular classrooms. Mundy (1993)
suggested that children diagnosed with high func-
tioning autism might achieve similar outcomes
and pointed out that several of the recovered chil-
dren in the follow-up study of the UCLA children
at age 13 (McEachin et al., 1993) had clinically
significant scores on some behavioral measures.
The UCLA team responded by noting that (a)
evaluators blind to background information had
not identified the recovered children as different
from neurotypical children and (b) a few elevated
scores may not imply abnormality because several
of the neurotypical peers had them as well (Smith,
McEachin, & Lovaas, 1993). Questions were also

418

q American Association on Mental Retardation

VOLUME

110,

NUMBER

6: 417–438

z

NOVEMBER

2005

AMERICAN JOURNAL ON MENTAL RETARDATION

Intensive behavioral treatment

G. O. Sallows and T. D. Graupner

raised regarding whether or not the UCLA results
could be fully replicated without the use of aver-
sives, which were part of the UCLA protocol, but
are not acceptable in most communities (Schreib-
man, 1997). Some have questioned the feasibility
of implementing the program without the resourc-
es of a university research center to train and su-
pervise treatment staff (Sheinkopf & Siegel, 1998)
and to help defray the cost of the program, which,
due to the many hours of weekly treatment, can
exceed $50,000 per year (although it has been ar-
gued that the cost of not providing treatment may
be much greater over time: Jacobson, Mulick, &
Green, 1998). Finally, because only about half of
the children showed marked gains, the need for
predictors to determine which children will ben-
efit has been raised (Kazdin, 1993). Lovaas and
his colleagues responded to these and other criti-
cisms (Lovaas, Smith, & McEachin, 1989; Smith
et al., 1993; Smith & Lovaas, 1997), but agreed
with others that replication and further research
were necessary.

There have now been several reports of partial

replication without using aversives (Anderson, Av-
ery, Di Pietro, Edwards, & Christian, 1987; Birn-
brauer & Leach, 1993; Eikeseth, Smith, Jahr, &
Eldevik, 2002; Smith, Groen, & Wynn, 2000).
Most found, as did Lovaas and his colleagues, that
a subset of children showed marked improvement
in IQ. Although fewer children reached average
levels of functioning, the treatment provided in
these studies differed from the UCLA model in
several ways (e.g., lower intensity and duration of
treatment, different sample characteristics and cur-
riculum, and less training and supervision of
staff).

Anderson et al. (1987) provided 15 hours per

week for 1 to 2 years (parents provided another 5
hours) and found that 4 of 14 children achieved
an IQ over 80 and were in regular classes, but all
needed some support. Birnbrauer and Leach
(1993) provided 19 hours per week for 1.5 to 2
years and found that 4 of 9 children achieved an
IQ over 80 (classroom placement was not report-
ed), but all had poor play skills and self-stimula-
tory behaviors. The authors noted, however, that
their treatment program had not addressed these
areas. Smith et al. (2000) provided 25 hours per
week for 33 months and reported that 4 of 15
children achieved an IQ over 85 and were in reg-
ular classes, but one had behavior problems. The
authors noted that their sample had an atypically
high number of mute children, 13 of 15, consid-

erably higher than the commonly cited figure of
50% (Smith & Lovaas, 1997), and they hypothe-
sized that this was the reason for the relatively low
number of children functioning in the average
range following treatment. Eikeseth et al. (2002)
provided 28 hours per week for 1 year. In their
sample, 7 of 13 children with pretreatment IQ
over 50 achieved IQ over 85 and were in regular
classes with some support. Data beyond the first
year have not yet been reported.

Four groups of investigators discussed results

based on behavioral treatment in classroom set-
tings, which typically include a mix of 1:1 treat-
ment and group activities, so that time in school
may not be comparable to hours reported in
home-based studies. Following 4 years of treat-
ment, Fenske, Zalenski, Krantz, and Mc-
Clannahan (1985) found that 4 of 9 children were
placed in regular classes. However, neither pre–
posttreatment test scores nor amount of support
in school were reported. Harris et al. (1991) pro-
vided 5.5 hours per day in class and instructed
parents to provide an additional 10 to 15 hours
at home (no data were collected on actual hours
parents provided). After 1 year of treatment, 6 of
9 children achieved IQ over 85, but were still in
classes for students with learning disabilities. A lat-
er report (Harris & Handleman, 2000) found that
9 of 27 children achieved IQ over 85 and were
placed in regular classes (time in treatment was
not reported), but most required some support.
Meyer, Taylor, Levin, and Fisher (2001) provided
30 hours of class time per week for at least 2 years
and reported that 7 of 26 children were placed in
public schools after 3.5 years of treatment, but 5
required support services. Pre–post IQ was not re-
ported. Romanczyk, Lockshin, and Matey (2001)
provided 30 hours of class time per week for 3.3
years and reported that 15% of the children were
discharged to regular classrooms. No information
on posttreatment test scores or the need for sup-
ports was provided.

In two studies researchers examined the ef-

fects of behavioral treatment for children with low
pretreatment IQ. Smith, Eikeseth, Klevstrand, and
Lovaas (1997) provided children who had pre-
treatment IQ less than 35 (M

5 28) with 30 hours

per week for 35 months and reported an increase
in IQ of 8 points (3 of 11 children achieved in-
creases of over 15 points) and 10 of 11 achieved
single-word expressive speech. Eldevik, Eikeseth,
Jahr, and Smith (in press) provided children who
had an average pretreatment IQ of 41 with 22

q American Association on Mental Retardation

419

VOLUME

110,

NUMBER

6: 417–438

z

NOVEMBER

2005

AMERICAN JOURNAL ON MENTAL RETARDATION

Intensive behavioral treatment

G. O. Sallows and T. D. Graupner

hours per week of 1:1 treatment for 20 months
and reported an increase in IQ of 8 points and an
increase in language standard scores of 11 points.

In three studies researchers examined results

of behavioral treatment provided by clinicians
working outside university settings in what has
been termed parent-managed treatment because par-
ents implement treatment designed by a workshop
consultant, 
who supervises less frequently (e.g.,
once every 2 to 4 months) than the supervision
that occurs in programs supervised by a local au-
tism treatment center (e.g., twice per week). Shein-
kopf and Siegel (1998) reported results for chil-
dren who received 19 hours of treatment per week
for 16 months supervised by three local providers.
Six of 11 children achieved IQ over 90 and 5 were
in regular classes, but still had residual symptoms.
However, these children may not be comparable
to high achievers in other studies because intelli-
gence tests included the Merrill-Palmer, a measure
of primarily nonverbal skills, known to yield
scores about 15 points higher than standard in-
telligence tests that include both verbal and non-
verbal scales. In the second study, Bibby, Eike-
seth, Martin, Mudford, and Reeves (2002) de-
scribed results for children who received 30 hours
of treatment per week (range

5 14 to 40) for 32

months (range

5 17 to 43) supervised by 25 dif-

ferent consultants, who saw the children several
times per year (median

5 4, range 5 0 to 26).

Ten of 66 children achieved IQ over 85, and 4
were in regular classes without help. However, as
the authors noted, their sample was unlike
UCLA’s in several ways: 15% had a pretreatment
IQ under 37, 57% were older than 48 months,
many received fewer than 20 hours per week, 80%
of the providers were not UCLA-trained, and no
child received weekly supervision. Weiss (1999) re-
ported the results of a study in which children did
receive high hours: 40 hours of treatment per
week for 2 years. She saw each child every 4 to 6
weeks, reviewed videos of their performance every
2 to 3 weeks, and spoke with parents weekly. Fol-
lowing treatment, 9 of 20 children achieved scores
on the Vineland Applied Behavior Composite
(ABC) of over 90, were placed in regular classes,
and had scores on the Childhood Autism Rating
Scale in the nonautistic range (under 30). No pre-
or posttreatment IQ data were reported.

Several researchers have described pretreat-

ment variables that seem to predict (are highly
correlated with) later outcome. Although findings
have not always been consistent, the most com-

monly noted predictors have been IQ (Bibby et
al., 2002; Eikeseth et al., 2002; Goldstein, 2002;
Lovaas, 1987; Newsom & Rincover, 1989), pres-
ence of imitation ability (Goldstein, 2002; Lovaas
& Smith, 1988; Newsom & Rincover, 1989;
Weiss, 1999), language (Lord & Paul, 1997; Ven-
ter, Lord, & Schopler, 1992), younger age at in-
tervention (Bibby et al., 2002; Fenske et al., 1985;
Goldstein, 2002; Harris & Handleman, 2000), se-
verity of symptoms (Venter et al., 1992), and so-
cial responsiveness or ‘‘joint attention’’ (Bono,
Daley, & Sigman, 2004; L. Koegel, Koegel, Shos-
han, & McNerney, 1999; Lord & Paul, 1997).

Multiple regression has been used to deter-

mine combinations of pretreatment variables with
strong relationships with outcome. Goldstein
(2002) reported that verbal imitation plus IQ plus
age resulted in an R

2

of .78 with acquisition of

spoken language. Rapid learning during the first 3
or 4 months of treatment has also been associated
with positive outcome (Lovaas & Smith, 1988;
Newsom & Rincover, 1989; Weiss, 1999). Weiss
reported that rapid acquisition of verbal imitation
plus nonverbal imitation plus receptive instruc-
tions resulted in an R

2

of .71 with Vineland ABC

and .73 with Childhood Autism Rating Scale
scores 2 years later.

We designed the present study to examine

several questions. Can a community-based pro-
gram operating without the resources, support, or
supervision of a university center, implement the
UCLA program with a similar population of chil-
dren and achieve similar results without using av-
ersives? Do significant residual symptoms of au-
tism remain among children who achieve post-
treatment test scores in the average range? Can
pretreatment variables be identified that accurate-
ly predict outcome? We also examined the com-
parative effectiveness of a less costly parent-di-
rected treatment model.

Method

Participants

Researchers at the Wisconsin site worked in

collaboration with and observed the guidelines set
by the National Institutes of Mental Health
(NIMH) for Lovaas’ Multi-Site Young Autism
Project. Children were recruited through local
birth to three (special education) programs. All
children were screened for eligibility according to
the following criteria: (a) age at intake between 24
and 42 months, (b) ratio estimate (mental age

420

q American Association on Mental Retardation

VOLUME

110,

NUMBER

6: 417–438

z

NOVEMBER

2005

AMERICAN JOURNAL ON MENTAL RETARDATION

Intensive behavioral treatment

G. O. Sallows and T. D. Graupner

Table 1.

Demographic Information and Hours of

Service by Group

Descriptor

Clinic-directed

Parent-

directed

Boys, girls

11, 2

8, 2

One-parent

families

0 of 13

1 of 10

Income

Median ($)

62,000

59,000

(Range)

(35–100

1)

(30–100

1)

Education (BA)

Mothers

9 of 12

9 of 10

Fathers

10 of 12

6 of 9

Siblings (mean)

2

2

No. nonverbal (%) 8/13 (62)

2/10 (20)

Age (months) (SD)

Pretest

33.23 (3.89)

34.20 (5.06)

Treatment

35.00 (4.86)

37.10 (5.36)

Posttest

83.23 (8.92)

82.50 (6.61)

1:1 hours per

week (SD)

Year 1

38.60 (2.91)

31.67 (5.81)

Year 2

36.55 (3.83)

30.88 (4.04)

Senior therapist

6–10 hrs

per week

3, 2- to 3-hr

sessions

6 hrs

per month

1, 3-hr session

per 2 wks

Team meetings

1 hr per week 1 hr per 1 or

2 weeks

Progress review

1 hr per wk

for 1–2
years then
1 hr per 2
months

1 hr every

other
month

Note. The 1:1 hours for parent-directed children excludes
one child who received 14 hours per week.

[MA] divided by chronological age [CA]) of the
Mental Development Index of 35 or higher (the
ratio estimate was used because almost all children
scored below the lowest Mental Development In-
dex of 50 from the Bayley Scales of Infant De-
velopment Second Edition (Bayley, 1993), (c)
neurologically within ‘‘normal’’ limits (children
with abnormal EEGs or controlled seizures were
accepted) as determined by a pediatric neurologist
(no children were excluded based on this criteri-
on), and (d) a diagnosis of autism by independent
child psychiatrists well known for their experience
and familiarity with autism. All children also met
the criteria for autism based on the Diagnostic
and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
DSM-IV (American Psychiatric Association, 1994)
and the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised
(Lord, Rutter, & LeCouteur, 1994), both admin-
istered by a trained examiner. There were no pa-
rental criteria for involvement beyond agreeing to
the conditions in the informed consent docu-
ment, one of which was accepting random assign-
ment to treatment conditions. The parents of all
screened children agreed to participate, and none
dropped out upon learning of their group assign-
ment, minimizing bias in selection of participants
and group composition.

Thirteen children began treatment in 1996, 11

in 1997, and 14 in 1998–1999. The last group had
not completed treatment when the data from the
first two groups were analyzed, and their data will
be reported in a subsequent paper. The 24 chil-
dren admitted during the first 2 years were 19
boys and 5 girls. One girl was placed in foster care
after 1 year of treatment, and the foster parents
did not wish to continue treatment for her. Her
data were, therefore, excluded from the analysis.
The remaining 23 children had completed 4 years
of treatment (or had ‘‘graduated’’ earlier) at the
time of this report, although 1 child switched to
another provider of behavioral treatment after 1
year.

Design

In accordance with the research protocol ap-

proved by NIMH, we matched children on pre-
treatment IQ (Bayley MA divided by CA). They
were randomly assigned by a UCLA statistician to
the clinic-directed group (n

5 13), replicating the

parameters of the UCLA intensive behavioral
treatment (Lovaas, 1987) or to the parent-directed
group (n

5 10), intended to be a less intensive

alternative treatment.

All children received treatment based on the

UCLA model. Parents in both groups were in-
structed to attend weekly team meetings and were
encouraged to extend the impact of treatment by
practicing newly learned material with their child
throughout the day. Demographic information as
well as hours of treatment and supervision are
shown in Table 1. Children averaged 33 to 34
months of age at pretest and began treatment at
35 to 37 months. Children in the clinic-directed

q American Association on Mental Retardation

421

VOLUME

110,

NUMBER

6: 417–438

z

NOVEMBER

2005

AMERICAN JOURNAL ON MENTAL RETARDATION

Intensive behavioral treatment

G. O. Sallows and T. D. Graupner

group were to receive 40 hours per week of direct
treatment. The actual average was 39 during Year
1 and 37 during Year 2, with gradually decreasing
hours thereafter as children entered school. Par-
ents in the parent-directed group chose the num-
ber of weekly treatment hours provided by ther-
apists. The average was 32 hours during Year 1
and 31 during Year 2, with the exception of one
family that chose to have 14 hours both years.
Because the parent-directed children as a group
received more intensive treatment than was pro-
vided in most previous studies, only 6 to 7 hours
less than the clinic-directed group, our ability to
examine the effect of differences in treatment in-
tensity was limited.

The clinic-directed group received 6 to 10

hours per week of in-home supervision from a se-
nior therapist and weekly consultation by the se-
nior author or clinic supervisor. Parent-directed
children received 6 hours per month of in-home
supervision from a senior therapist (typically a 3-
hour session every other week) and consultation
every 2 months by the senior author or clinic su-
pervisor.

Direct treatment staff, referred to as therapists,

were hired by Wisconsin Early Autism Project
staff members for both the clinic- and parent-di-
rected groups. Funding for 35 hours of 1:1 treat-
ment per week was provided through the Wiscon-
sin Medical Assistance program. Treatment hours
in excess of 35 were funded through project funds.

Measures

We used the Bayley Scales of Infant Devel-

opment, Second Edition, to determine pretreat-
ment IQ. In addition we used the Merrill-Palmer
Scale of Mental Tests (Stutsman, 1948), an older
test of intelligence recommended for use with
nonverbal children (Howlin, 1998), as a measure
of nonverbal intelligence but not pre- or posttreat-
ment IQ. We employed the Reynell Developmen-
tal Language Scales (Reynell & Gruber, 1990) to
assess language ability, because of its extensive
psychometric data for preschool-age children, and
the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (Sparrow,
Balla, & Cicchetti, 1984) to measure adaptive
functioning. Subscales of the Vineland assess
Communication in Daily Life, Daily Living Skills,
and Social Skills. Information regarding develop-
mental history (including loss of language and
other skills), use of supplemental treatments and
pretreatment presence of functional speech was

gathered from parent interviews, reports from oth-
er professionals, and direct observation.

Follow-up testing was administered annually

for 4 years. As children grew older or became too
advanced for the norms of pretreatment tests, we
used other age-appropriate tests. Cognitive func-
tioning of older children was assessed using
Wechsler tests for 20 children Wechsler Pre-
school and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Revised
WPPSI (Wechsler, 1989); Wechsler Intelligence
Scale for Children WISC-III (Wechsler, 1991)
and the Bayley II for 3 children. Although we as-
sessed nonverbal cognitive functioning, it was not
used as a measure of posttreatment IQ; we em-
ployed the Leiter-R for 11 children (Roid & Mill-
er, 1995, 1997) and the Merrill-Palmer for 12 chil-
dren. Language was measured using the Clinical
Evaluation of Language Fundamentals, Third
Edition CELF III (Semel, Wiig, & Secord, 1995)
for 11 children and the Reynell for 12 children.
We administered the Vineland to all children for
assessment of adaptive functioning.

To assess posttreatment social functioning, we

readministered the Autism Diagnostic Interview-
Revised and used the Personality Inventory for
Children (Wirt, Lachar, Klinedinst, & Seat, 1977),
which was completed by parents of all 23 children
after 3 years of treatment. After 4 years of treat-
ment, when the children were approximately 7
years old, parents and teachers completed the
Child Behavior Checklist (Achenbach, 1991a,
1991b) and Vineland for all 23 children. Bierman
and Welsh (1997) noted that ‘‘teacher ratings are
superior to those of other informants and provide
information regarding peer interaction and group
acceptance that are closest to those of peers’’ (p.
348). Information was obtained from teachers on
classroom placement (regular, regular with modi-
fied curriculum, partial special education [e.g.,
pullout/resource room or full special education],
and supportive/therapeutic services [e.g., class-
room aide, speech or occupational therapy]) when
the children were 7 years old. We used the Wood-
cock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement (Wood-
cock, McGrew, & Mather, 2001) to measure aca-
demic skills of children placed in regular educa-
tion classes at age 7.

The second author administered the pretreat-

ment assessment battery prior to children being
assigned to treatment groups. She received train-
ing in assessment at UCLA and met criterion for
satisfactory intertester reliability. One fourth of
the children in the current study were tested prior

422

q American Association on Mental Retardation

VOLUME

110,

NUMBER

6: 417–438

z

NOVEMBER

2005

AMERICAN JOURNAL ON MENTAL RETARDATION

Intensive behavioral treatment

G. O. Sallows and T. D. Graupner

to treatment by unaffiliated community psychol-
ogists. These children earned a ratio IQ of 50.3
on the Bayley administered by the independent
psychologists and 47.3 from the Wisconsin Pro-
ject evaluator. The mean absolute difference was
three points, r

5 .83, indicating absence of bias

by the Wisconsin Project evaluator. Children who
achieved IQs of 85 or higher at annual follow-up
testing were thereafter referred for assessment by
psychologists who had extensive experience test-
ing children with autism at hospital-based assess-
ment clinics that were not affiliated with the Wis-
consin Project. These psychologists, who were un-
aware of group assignment or length of time in
treatment, used the tests listed above. Follow-up
testing of most children whose IQ remained de-
layed was conducted by the second author to re-
duce cost.

One experimental assessment procedure, the

Early Learning Measure developed at UCLA
(Smith, Buch, & Gamby, 2000) was administered
to measure the rate of acquisition of skills during
the first several months of treatment. Every 3
weeks for 3 months leading up to the beginning
of treatment and for 6 months after treatment
started, the same list of 40 items (10 each of verbal
imitation, nonverbal imitation, following verbal
instructions, and expressive object labeling),
which was known only to the experimenter, was
presented to the children. Two sets of scores were
obtained from the Early Learning Measure. The
first was the number of items the child performed
correctly prior to the onset of treatment. The sec-
ond set of scores was the number of weeks re-
quired for the child to learn 90% of the verbal
imitation items once treatment had begun, there-
by providing a measure of the child’s rate of ac-
quisition. This criterion was selected based on ear-
lier research with the Early Learning Measure,
which suggested the predictive validity of rapid
acquisition of verbal imitation (Lovaas & Smith,
1988).

Treatment Procedure

The treatment procedure and curriculum were

those initially described by Lovaas (Lovaas et al.,
1981), except that no aversives were used, with the
addition of procedures supported by subsequent
research (e.g., R. Koegel & Koegel, 1995), which
have been widely disseminated (e.g., Maurice,
Green, & Luce, 1996). Positive interactions were
built by engaging in favorite activities and re-
sponding to the gestures used by each child to

indicate desires. Anticipation of success and mo-
tivation to attend were increased by employing
brief, standard instructions and tasks requiring
only visual attending (e.g., matching), using fa-
miliar materials (e.g., the child’s own ring stacker),
prompting success (physically assisting him or her
to place a ring on the pole if a demonstration was
not sufficient), presenting only two or three trials
at a time, and reinforcing each response immedi-
ately with powerful reinforcers (e.g., edibles, phys-
ical play, or enthusiastic proclamations of success
(such as ‘‘Fantastic!’’). Between these brief (ini-
tially 30 seconds long) learning periods, staff
members played with the children to keep the
process more like play than work, generalize
learned material into more natural settings, and
continue to build social responsiveness.

Receptive language was generally targeted be-

fore expressive language. We used familiar instruc-
tions where success was easily prompted, such as
‘‘sit down’’ or ‘‘come here.’’ Expressive language
began with imitation training, first nonverbal then
vocal imitation, beginning with single sounds and
gradually progressing to words. Requesting was
taught as early as possible, initially using nonverbal
strategies if necessary (e.g., gesturing, signing, or the
Picture Exchange Communication System PECS
(Bondy & Frost, 1994), in order to reduce frustra-
tion (Carr & Durand, 1985) and increase the child’s
frequency of communicative initiations (Hart &
Risley, 1975). Children who showed more modest
gains in treatment, referred to as visual learners by
the UCLA group, denoting difficulty in processing
language, took longer to acquire verbal imitation
and language.

Having learned many labels, children were

taught more complex concepts and skills, such as
categorization and speaking in full sentences. So-
cial interaction and cooperative play were taught
as part of the in-home program, expanding from
playing with staff, to playing with siblings, and
then peers for up to 2 hours per day (this was
more successful with the subgroup of rapidly
learning children). As the children acquired social
skills, they began mainstream (as opposed to spe-
cial education) preschool, usually for just 1 or 2
half-days (2.5 hours each) per week. A trained
shadow (one of the home treatment team mem-
bers) initially accompanied the child to assist with
attending to the teacher’s instructions, joining
others on the playground, and noting social errors
to be addressed in 1:1 sessions at home.

Those children who progressed at a rapid pace

q American Association on Mental Retardation

423

VOLUME

110,

NUMBER

6: 417–438

z

NOVEMBER

2005

AMERICAN JOURNAL ON MENTAL RETARDATION

Intensive behavioral treatment

G. O. Sallows and T. D. Graupner

Figure 1.

Changes in Full Scale IQ during 4 years

of behavioral treatment.

were taught the beginnings of inferential thought
(e.g., ‘‘Why does he feel sad?’’). Social and con-
versation skills, such as topic maintenance and
asking appropriate questions, were taught using
role-playing (e.g., Jahr, Eldevik, & Eikeseth, 2000),
video modeling (Charlop & Milstein, 1989), social
stories (Gray, 1994), straightforward discussion of
social rules and etiquette, and in-vivo prompting.

Academic skills were also targeted, raising the

level of proficiency of rapidly learning children to
first grade levels. Common classroom rules and
school ‘‘survival skills’’ (e.g., responding to group
instructions and raising one’s hand to be called
on Dawson & Osterling, 1997) were taught
through ‘‘mock school’’ exercises with several
peers at home.

Staff training. Therapists were at least 18 years

old, had completed a minimum of 1 year of col-
lege, and were screened for prior police contacts.
Therapists received 30 hours of training, which
included a minimum of 10 hours of one-to-one
training and feedback while working with their as-
signed child. Each therapist worked at least 6
hours per week (usually three 2-hour shifts) and
attended weekly or bi-weekly team meetings. Se-
nior therapists had at least a 4-year college degree
and experience consisting of 1 year as a therapist
with at least two children, followed by an inten-
sive 16-week internship program modeled after
that at UCLA, for a total of 2,000 hours.

Treatment fidelity. Senior therapists and clinic-

directed therapists were required to meet quality
control criteria set at UCLA. This involved pass-
ing two tests. The first was a written test designed
to assess knowledge of basic behavioral principles
and treatment procedures described in The Me
Book 
(Lovaas et al., 1981). Second, they were re-
quired to pass a videotaped review of their work
(conducted by Tristram Smith, research director
of the Multi-Site Project, who used the protocol
described by R. Koegel, Russo, and Rincover,
1977). All senior therapists also received weekly
supervision by the senior author.

Progress reviews, which the child, parents, and

senior therapist attended, were held weekly for
clinic-directed children and every 2 months for
parent-directed children. At these reviews, the se-
nior author or the UCLA-trained clinic supervisor
observed the child’s performance and recom-
mended appropriate changes in the program.
Both the senior author and clinic supervisor had
met the UCLA criteria for Level Two Therapist,
denoting sufficient experience and expertise in

program implementation to work independent of
supervision. The senior author had directed a be-
haviorally oriented inpatient unit for children
with autism for 14 years and had trained at UCLA
for 6 months. The clinic supervisor had a BA in
psychology, 1 year of experience as a therapist, 2
years of full-time experience as a senior therapist,
and had completed a 9-month internship at
UCLA.

Data Analysis

Data analysis was carried out by a fourth year

graduate student from the University of Wiscon-
sin Department of Statistics, with consultation
from a university research psychologist. We con-
ducted an ANOVA with a least squares solution
for unequal group size, used to examine treatment
effects. To compare the clinic-directed and parent-
directed groups, we used 2

3 2 ANOVAS (Clinic-

Directed vs. Parent-Directed

3 Pre- vs. Posttest

scores as repeated measures). An initial examina-
tion of pre–post IQ data showed that the distri-
bution of scores was bimodal. As can be seen in
Figure 1, children showed either rapid progress or
more moderate progress, with no overlap between
outcome distributions. This is consistent with ear-
lier research (Birnbrauer & Leach, 1993; Howard,
Sparkman, Cohen, Green, & Stanislaw, 2005; O.
I. Lovaas, personal communication, August 27,
2003). Consequently, changes in scores for rapid
learners and moderate learners were analyzed sep-
arately.

424

q American Association on Mental Retardation

VOLUME

110,

NUMBER

6: 417–438

z

NOVEMBER

2005

AMERICAN JOURNAL ON MENTAL RETARDATION

Intensive behavioral treatment

G. O. Sallows and T. D. Graupner

In examining pretreatment scores of children

who would later be identified as rapid learners, we
found that those in the clinic-directed group had
higher mean IQ (60.40, standard deviation [SD]

5 8.31 compared to those in the parent-directed
group (51.00, SD

5 7.02), t(9) 51.84, , .05 (one

tailed), Vineland scores (clinic-directed

5 64.8,

SD

5 2.32; parent-directed 5 59.83, SD 53.34),

t(9)

5 2.31, , .05 (one tailed), and Verbal Im-

itation (clinic-directed

5 3.88; parent-directed 5

1.67), W(4, 6)

5 31, 5 .03 (Wilcoxon test). Be-

cause these pretreatment differences would inter-
fere with clear interpretation of posttreatment dif-
ferences between subgroups (e.g., clinic-directed
vs. parent-directed rapid learners), these compari-
sons were omitted. We used linear and logistic
regression (best subset selection approach Hos-
mer, Jovanovic, & Lemeshow, 1989) to develop
prediction models using pretreatment measures as
predictors of 3-year outcome.

Results

The average Full Scale IQ for all 23 children

increased from 51 to 76, a 25-point increase. Eight
of the children achieved IQs of 85 or higher after
1 year of treatment (5 clinic-directed and 3 parent-
directed), and 3 more reached this level after 3 to
4 years (3 parent-directed) for a total of 11, or
48%, of the 23 children. Children with higher pre-
treatment IQs were more likely to reach 4-year
IQs in the average range (75% of children with
IQs between 55 and 64 versus 17%, 1 of 6 chil-
dren with IQs between 35 and 44).

As shown in Table 2, there were no significant

differences between groups at pre- or posttest.
Combining children in both groups, we found
that pretest to posttest gains were significant for
Full Scale IQ, F(1, 21)

5 18.77, , .01, Verbal

IQ, F(1, 18)

5 13.39, , .01, Performance IQ,

F(1, 18)

5 46.79, , .01, receptive language, F(1,

21)

5 9.18, , .01, Vineland Communication,

F(1, 21)

5 7.57, , .05, Vineland Socialization,

F(1, 21)

5 10.30, , .01, Autism Diagnostic In-

terview-Revised Social Skills, F(1, 18)

5 19.15, p

, .01, and Communication, F(1, 18) 5 41.19, p

, .01.

Rapid and Moderate Learners

A group of rapid learners showed much larger

improvements than did moderate learners (anal-
ogous to the terms best outcome and non-best out-
come 
used in UCLA reports). Figure 1 shows Full

Scale IQs prior to treatment and over the next 4
years for all 23 children. Eleven of them (5 clinic-
directed and 6 parent-directed) showed a large in-
crease in IQ, from a mean of 55 prior to treatment
to 104 after 4 years. These rapid learners repre-
sented 48% of all 23 children. The IQ of the re-
maining 12 children (8 clinic-directed and 4 par-
ent-directed) did not show a significant increase,
consistent with earlier UCLA reports (e.g., Smith
et al., 2000).

Pre- and posttreatment scores of rapid and

moderate learners are shown in Table 3. Rapid
learners showed significant gains in all areas mea-
sured (i.e., Full Scale IQ, F(1, 21)

5 143.19, ,

.01, Verbal IQ, F(1, 18)

5 70.76, , .01, Perfor-

mance IQ, F(1, 18)

5 165.27, , .01, Nonverbal

IQ, F(1, 19)

5 16.69, , .01, Receptive Lan-

guage, F(1, 20)

5 217.76, , .01, Expressive Lan-

guage, F(1, 20)

5 77.76, , .01, and all Vineland

subscales: Communication, F(1, 21)

5 147.07, p

, .01, Daily Living Skills (F(1,21) 5 20.50, p ,
.01), Socialization, F(1, 21)

5 42.89, , .01, and

Applied Behavior Composite, F(1, 21)

5 54.17, p

, .01). However, the rate of increase over time,
skill areas, and children was not uniform. As can
be seen in Figure 2, during the first year, Perfor-
mance IQ of rapid learners rose to the average
range (a 40-point increase, WPPSI-R), whereas
Verbal IQ and Vineland Socialization scores rose
to around 80 (a 25-point increase) and language
scores (Reynell and Clinical Evaluation of Lan-
guage Fundamentals) rose only to the 60s. Chang-
es during the second year of treatment were com-
paratively modest, perhaps reflecting the effect of
having acquired speech during the first year but
still lacking more complex language. The rate of
improvement increased again during the third and
fourth years, and all scores increased to the aver-
age range.

The gradual decrease in the slope of the

graphs in Years 3 and 4 is largely an artifact of
increasing age and does not reflect a decrease in
rate of MA growth, which, except for the large
increase during Year 1, averaged 18 months per
year throughout the study. This rate of growth in
skills is necessary for children with pretreatment
scores below 60 to ‘‘catch up’’ to peers. Although
some writers have noted a rate of growth among
treated children of 10 to 12 months per year, this
is not enough for them to reach scores in the av-
erage range within just a few years (Howard et al.,
2005), and the longer that children are delayed,
the more skills they must learn to catch up.

q American Association on Mental Retardation

425

VOLUME

110,

NUMBER

6: 417–438

z

NOVEMBER

2005

AMERICAN JOURNAL ON MENTAL RETARDATION

Intensive behavioral treatment

G. O. Sallows and T. D. Graupner

Table 2.

Pretreatment and Outcome Scores of Clinic- (CD) and Parent-Directed (PD) Groups

Measure/
Group

Pretreatment

Mean

SD

Posttreatment

Mean

SD

ANOVA, combined

groups, pre- vs.

posttreatment (df)

Full Scale IQ

CD

50.85

10.57

73.08

33.08

18.77 (1,21)**

PD

52.10

8.98

79.60

21.80

Verbal IQ

CD

78.00

33.48

13.39 (1,18)**

PD

76.30

26.66

Perform IQ

CD

84.90

25.86

46.79 (1,18)**

PD

90.70

20.72

Nonverbal IQ

CD

70.58

16.54

77.58

25.24

2.07 (1,21)

PD

82.67

14.94

89.44

18.35

Rec Language

CD

38.85

6.09

55.85

36.23

9.18 (1,21)**

PD

38.78

6.44

65.78

25.81

Exp Language

CD

47.92

6.17

53.38

31.91

1.30 (1,20)

PD

48.44

6.96

59.22

25.13

Vineland

Com

CD

57.46

4.97

73.69

32.32

7.57 (1,21)*

PD

63.20

5.58

81.40

24.33

DLS

a

CD

63.92

5.53

66.23

25.95

.11 (1,21)

PD

64.20

3.68

64.20

12.42

Soc

CD

58.38

6.17

73.92

23.49

10.30 (1,21)**

PD

60.30

5.76

68.90

10.11

ABC

b

CD

59.54

5.31

69.00

28.04

2.81 (1,21)

PD

60.90

5.94

66.70

14.68

ADI-R

c

Social

CD

17.54

3.73

12.33

10.58

19.15 (1,18)**

PD

18.90

1.14

13.10

9.42

Com

CD

12.85

2.44

8.08

6.91

41.19 (1,18)**

PD

12.90

1.22

8.80

7.43

Ritual

CD

5.38

1.69

5.08

3.75

1.72 (1,18)

PD

6.40

1.11

5.60

3.50

Note. CD n

5 13; PD 5 10 except for Verbal IQ and Performance IQ, where was 10 for both groups because 3

CD children had only Bayley tests. Neither the main effect of groups (CD vs. PD) nor the interaction of groups by time
was significant for any variable. Full scale IQs at pretreatment are Bayley scores.

a

Daily living skills.

b

Adaptive Behavior Composite.

c

Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised.

*p

, .05. **, .01.

426

q American Association on Mental Retardation

VOLUME

110,

NUMBER

6: 417–438

z

NOVEMBER

2005

AMERICAN JOURNAL ON MENTAL RETARDATION

Intensive behavioral treatment

G. O. Sallows and T. D. Graupner

Table 3.

Pretreatment and Outcome Scores of Rapid (R) and Moderate (M) Learners

Measure/
Group

Pretreatment

Mean

SD

Posttreatment

Mean

SD

ANOVA Pre–Post

comparisons

Full Scale IQ

R

55.27

8.96

103.73

13.35

143.19 (1,21)**

M

47.83

9.37

50.42

6.98

0.45 (1,21)

Verbal IQ

R

101.45

18.72

70.76 (1,18)**

M

47.44

2.06

.02 (1,18)

Perform IQ

R

107.55

9.44

165.27 (1,18)**

M

63.67

8.43

11.81 (1,18)**

Nonverbal IQ

R

83.56

14.84

108.78

10.96

16.69 (1,19)**

M

69.83

15.93

67.70

12.35

0.19 (1,19)

Rec Language

R

39.30

6.91

93.60

12.64

217.76 (1,20)**

M

38.42

5.59

31.83

9.87

3.84 (1,20)

Exp Language

R

49.90

7.75

85.70

15.07

77.76 (1,20)**

M

47.50

6.54

30.83

5.89

20.24 (1,20)**

Vineland

Com

R

60.82

4.02

105.09

12.83

147.07 (1,21)**

M

59.17

7.22

51.33

10.94

5.07 (1,21)*

DLS

a

R

66.45

4.25

82.27

16.34

20.50 (1,21)**

M

61.83

4.20

49.83

10.61

12.87 (1,21)**

Soc

R

61.55

6.58

87.73

14.94

42.89 (1,21)**

M

57.08

4.63

57.08

6.40

0.00 (1,21)

ABC

b

R

61.73

4.59

88.64

15.68

54.17 (1,21)**

M

58.67

6.09

49.08

7.76

7.51 (1,21)*

ADI-R

c

Social

R

16.45

3.26

4.18

4.37

46.89 (1,21)**

M

19.67

1.55

21.18

6.28

0.43 (1,21)

Com

R

11.00

3.54

2.00

2.73

52.04 (1,21)**

M

13.75

0.60

14.81

3.59

1.26 (1,21)

Ritual

R

5.91

1.62

2.73

2.67

16.46 (1,21)**

M

5.92

1.44

7.91

2.47

4.87 (1,21)*

Note. n

5 11; M 5 12. Posttreatment language scores for moderate learners are Reynell ratio scores (AE/CA), which

are about 10 points lower than standard scores. Effect size expressed as proportion of variance was .88 for Full Scale IQ,
.90 for receptive language, .84 for expressive language, and .73 for Vineland ABC, all quite large (Cohen, 1988). Full
Scale IQs at pretreatment are Bayley scores.

a

Daily living skills.

b

Adaptive Behavior Composite.

c

Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised.

*p

, .05. **, .01.