Biological Psychology 53 (2000) 69 – 78

Acute increases in night-time plasma melatonin

levels following a period of meditation



Gregory A. Tooley

a,

*, Stuart M. Armstrong

b

,

Trevor R. Norman

c

, Avni Sali

d

a

School of PsychologyLa Trobe Uni

6ersityBundooraVictoriaAustralia

b

Brain Sciences InstituteSwinburne Uni

6ersity of TechnologyHawthornVictoriaAustralia

c

Department of PsychiatryUni

6ersity of MelbourneAustin-Repatriation CampusHeidelberg,

VictoriaAustralia

d

Graduate School of Integrati

6e MedicineSwinburne Uni6ersity of TechnologyHawthorn,

VictoriaAustralia

Received 1 September 1999; received in revised form 7 June 1999; accepted 10 November 1999

Abstract

To determine whether a period of meditation could influence melatonin levels, two groups

of meditators were tested in a repeated measures design for changes in plasma melatonin
levels at midnight. Experienced meditators practising either TM-Sidhi or another internation-
ally well known form of yoga showed significantly higher plasma melatonin levels in the
period immediately following meditation compared with the same period at the same time on
a control night. It is concluded that meditation, at least in the two forms studied here, can
affect plasma melatonin levels. It remains to be determined whether this is achieved through
decreased hepatic metabolism of the hormone or via a direct effect on pineal physiology.
Either way, facilitation of higher physiological melatonin levels at appropriate times of day
might be one avenue through which the claimed health promoting effects of meditation
occur. © 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

Keywords

:

Circadian rhythms; Meditation; Melatonin; Pineal; Relaxation

www.elsevier.com/locate/biopsycho



Research was carried out at La Trobe University

* Corresponding author. Present address: School of Psychology, Deakin University, 221 Burwood

Highway, Burwood, Victoria 3125, Australia. Tel.: + 61-3-92517234; fax: + 61-3-92446858.

E-mail address

:

greggo@deakin.edu.au (G.A. Tooley)

0301-0511/00/$ - see front matter © 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

PII: S 0 3 0 1 - 0 5 1 1 ( 0 0 ) 0 0 0 3 5 - 1

G.ATooley et al.

/

Biological Psychology

53 (2000) 69 – 78

70

1. Introduction

Meditation has been reported to have numerous acute effects on a diverse range

of endocrine, metabolic and autonomic parameters (Jevning et al., 1992). Early
scientific investigations of the transcendental meditation (TM) technique concluded
that it produced a unique hypometabolic state (Wallace, 1970), but this claim was
disputed in later studies which described TM merely as a biochemical resting state,
perhaps no different to relaxation (Michaels et al., 1976). Since that time however,
a number of studies have demonstrated clear differences between the physiological
effects of TM and those of eyes-closed rest (Jevning et al., 1992), and there can now
be little doubt that the technique can produce a physiological state which is
qualitatively different to that resulting from simple rest.

Although the uniqueness of the physiological effects of meditation has not been

clearly demonstrated against other more active relaxation strategies, such as
biofeedback or progressive muscle relaxation (Morse et al., 1977; Shapiro, 1982),
meditators consistently report greater subjective gains than have been reported for
other relaxation methods (Shapiro, 1982). One may conclude from this that either
there is a specific placebo effect for meditation, or that the physiological variables
responsible for the meditative state have not been identified. Until recently (Mas-
sion et al., 1995), melatonin, the major hormone produced and secreted by the
pineal gland had not been investigated as a variable in meditation research.
However, a number of parallels between the reported effects of meditation and
those of melatonin suggest a possible connection may exist between the two.

The pineal is situated in the epithalamus at the center of the brain and receives

sympathetic enervation from the superior cervical ganglia via the conarian nerves
(Moore, 1978). In mammals, the pineal produces and releases melatonin (Lerner et
al., 1958) only during darkness and it is not detectable during the day, irrespective
of whether the species is nocturnal or diurnal in its behavioural activity (Klein,
1985). The pineal rhythm of nocturnal melatonin release is generated by the
biological clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the anterior hypothalamus
(Moore and Eichler, 1972; Stephan and Zucker, 1972). In humans, melatonin
release is robust and appears resistant to major change by sleep, general activity, a
variety of stressors (Vaughan, 1986) except when severe (Monteleone et al., 1992),
diet, alcohol or beverage ingestion (Norman et al.). While bright light can inhibit
melatonin release (Lewy et al., 1980), and studies indicate that extended periods of
rigorous night-time physical exercise can decrease or phase delay the onset of the
melatonin rhythm (Van Reeth et al., 1994), no known natural substances or
phenomena have been reported to reliably increase plasma melatonin levels, al-
though some pharmacological compounds, e.g. monoamine-oxidase A inhibitors,
are able to do so (Murphy et al., 1986). The stability of the melatonin rhythm
makes it an ideal candidate for a biological timing hormone, a role which is
indisputable for rhythms in seasonal breeding of photosensitive mammals (Arendt,
1986) and has been postulated also for daily rhythms (Armstrong, 1989).

In addition to the biological rhythm functions of melatonin, other seemingly

non-rhythmic roles have been advanced, including; anti-cancer (Gupta et al., 1988;

G.ATooley et al.

/

Biological Psychology

53 (2000) 69 – 78

71

Panzer and Viljoen, 1997), immunoaugmentation (Maestroni et al., 1986), anti-ag-
ing (Maestroni et al., 1988; Pierpaoli, 1998) and anti-stress (Pierpaoli and
Maestroni, 1987). Although these properties have not yet been clearly established in
humans, the fact that melatonin has been found to be an extremely potent
antioxidant and free-radical scavenger (Reiter et al., 1997) suggests that it may have
an important role in reducing the cellular damage associated with the wear and tear
of normal day to day life.

In this context, it is interesting to note that anti-cancer (Solberg et al., 1995;

Meares, 1979), immunoaugmenting (Wallace, 1989), anti-aging (Wallace et al.,
1982) and anti-stress (Jevning et al., 1978a,b; MacLean et al., 1997) properties have
also been claimed in relation to meditation. While the validity of the anti-cancer
and anti aging claims in particular is debatable, the parallels with those made for
melatonin are intriguing, and invite speculation that one of the mechanisms by
which meditation might achieve some of its health benefits may be through an
effect on circulating melatonin levels. With the above in mind, the following
investigations were undertaken in order to test whether a period of meditation
could acutely affect plasma melatonin levels.

2. Methods

Two groups of meditators were studied in two separate experiments. The

protocol used entailed a repeated measures design consisting of control and
intervention conditions conducted on separate nights, 2 weeks apart. A crossover
design was used, with random allocation to either the control or intervention
condition on the first night, followed by the alternative condition on the second
night. The studies were carried out during winter months at the Austin-Repatria-
tion Medical Centre, Heidelberg, Melbourne, and the experimental protocol was
approved independently by the human ethics committees of both the medical centre
and La Trobe University. Prior to participation, potential subjects underwent a
screening interview to ensure that they were suffering from no medical or psychi-
atric illness, nor taking any medication, that might affect experimental outcome.

In the first experiment, 11 experienced meditators (six male and five female) who

practised the advanced transcendental meditation Sidhi (TM-Sidhi) program were
recruited. The mean age of this group was 38.82 years (S.D., 6.2) while mean
experience in the TM technique was 10.8 years (S.D., 6.19). Mean usual bed-time
was 22:44 (S.D., 46.69 min).

The intervention condition entailed a meditation session between 00:00 and 01:00

on one of the two nights. Although midnight is an unusual time to meditate, it was
chosen because melatonin levels normally begin to peak and plateau around this
time (between midnight and 04:00) and it is, therefore, a period of relative stability
of the melatonin curve (Arendt, 1995). Subjects were instructed not to meditate on
the afternoon prior to experimentation, to eat before 19:00, to avoid bright light,
but otherwise keep to their normal daily activities. One participant was subse-
quently excluded for failing to keep to these guidelines, leaving ten subjects.

G.ATooley et al.

/

Biological Psychology

53 (2000) 69 – 78

72

Between 21:30 and 22:00 a butterfly needle was inserted into a suitable vein in the
cubital fossa region of the forearm. Baseline samples were collected at 22:00, 23:00.
23:30 and 00:00. Post-treatment samples were taken at 20 min intervals between
01:00 and 02:00. Apart from during the treatment period itself, subjects were free to
talk, watch videos and imbibe light beverages, and the procedure was exactly the
same on both nights. When undergoing the intervention condition, participants
carried out their usual meditation practice, albeit at the unusual time. On the
control night, participants spent the h between midnight and 01:00 sitting quietly.
Lighting levels were monitored throughout the experiment and did not exceed 15
lux, a level well below that known to influence melatonin secretion (McIntyre et al.,
1988; Trinder et al., 1996).

Blood was centrifuged immediately and separated plasma was stored at − 20°C

until assayed. Plasma melatonin levels were assayed using a radioimmunoassay
(Fraser et al., 1983) with the intra-assay precision for = 10 samples being 4.9%
(cv%) for a melatonin pool of 82.4

94.1 pg/ml, and an inter-assay precision of

9.9%. Formal post-experimental questioning of our subjects indicated no sleep
during meditation, however, no objective validation of these subjective reports are
available since subjects were not monitored via EEG. Nevertheless, previous
polysomnographic evaluation of TM indicates that it is not the homogenous,
unique state of consciousness as was originally thought, for in addition to the
occurrence of the well publicised alpha levels, EEG patterns normally classified as
stages of sleep can occur (Pagano et al., 1976). Nevertheless, there is no evidence
that either the total amount of sleep (Jimmerson et al., 1977; Vaughan et al., 1976),
or any sleep stage (Vaughan et al., 1979) is associated with an increase in melatonin
release.

In the second experiment, seven practitioners (two males and five females) of

another internationally well known form of yoga

1

were recruited. It was normal

practice for these subjects to meditate for around 30 min, which is half that of the
usual TM-Sidhi routine. As a result, we collected two extra post-treatment blood
samples at 00:30 and 00:45 in this group. Apart from this, the experimental
protocol was exactly the same as for the TM-Sidhi group. The mean age of subjects
was 32.1 years (S.D., 7.01) while the mean number of years meditation experience
was 5.77 (S.D., 4.45). Mean usual bed-time was 23:27 h (S.D., 52.2 min).

3. Results

Mean control and treatment night plasma melatonin concentrations are shown

for each group in Fig. 1. It can be seen that the melatonin levels of the TM – Sidhi
group rose steadily during the pre-treatment period, from similar points and at
similar rates on both experimental nights. Post-treatment levels then diverged, with
control

night

values

plateauing

while

meditation

night

values

contin-

1

Practitioners agreed to participate in the research on the condition that their organization was not

identified.

G.ATooley et al.

/

Biological Psychology

53 (2000) 69 – 78

73

ued their rise for some time before they peaked and fell back to the final control
night value. The Yoga group, represented in Fig. 1(B), followed a similar trend,
even though they meditated for only half as long as the TM – Sidhi group. S.D.s are
indicative of the normal inter-subject variation in normal melatonin secretion
patterns, rather than within subject variance, which was the focus of the analysis.

Fig. 1. Means and standard errors for plasma melatonin levels at each sampling point for the ten
TM-Sidhi subjects and seven Yoga subjects on control and meditation nights.

G.ATooley et al.

/

Biological Psychology

53 (2000) 69 – 78

74

Table 1
Individual values and group means for post-treatment area under the curve (melatonin pg/ml) on
control and meditation nights

TM-Sidhi 01:00–02:00h

Yoga 00:30–02:00h

Control

Meditation

Meditation

Control

Participant number

1

90.00

173.85

195.40

54.00
66.50

141.00

46.90

68.35

2

25.00

26.45

58.50

3

45.00

278.00

209.00

167.55

198.50

4

160.00

154.00

254.30

261.20

5

384.40

423.55

129.00

6

122.00

369.90

412.00

7

141.00

158.00

42.50

28.00

8

66.00

66.00

9

10

363.00

405.00

203.13

226.49

152.80

124.85

Group means

111.85

101.41

142.33

153.42

S.D.

F(1,6) = 16.19, P

B0.01

F-test

F(1,9) = 11.12, P

B0.01

In order to statistically examine the hypothesis that meditation would cause an

acute increase in melatonin levels, the summary measure of area under the curve
(AUC) was calculated for each participant pre and post-treatment on each night
using the trapezoidal rule. Pre-treatment AUC was calculated using the four
samples collected between 22:00 and 0:00 h. For the TM-Sidhi group, pre-treatment
melatonin AUC means were 87.77 pg/ml (S.D., 81.32) on the control night and
82.54 pg/ml (S.D., 77.14) on the meditation night. Yoga group control night
pre-treatment levels were 135.29 pg/ml (S.D., 117.42) and 132.43 pg/ml (S.D.,
103.27) on the meditation night. Post-treatment AUC encompassed samples col-
lected immediately post-treatment (01:00 for TM-Sidhi and 00:30 for the Yoga
group) until 02:00. Mean post-treatment melatonin AUC for the TM-Sidhi group
was 124.85 pg/ml (S.D., 101.47) on the control night and 152.8 pg/ml (S.D., 111.83)
post-meditation. Corresponding figures for the yoga group were 203.13 pg/ml
(S.D., 142.33) on the control night and 226.49 pg/ml (S.D., 153.42) post-meditaton.

A two-way repeated measures ANOVA was conducted with treatment (medita-

tion/control) and time (pre-/post-treatment) as independent variables. Due to the
fact that the Yoga group meditated for only half an h, the post-treatment period
over which AUC was calculated was a half h longer than for the TM-Sidhi group.
Individual data for the post-treatment periods only and relevant statistics are
presented in Table 1. Analysis of melatonin AUC TM-Sidhi group found a
significant treatment by time interaction (F(1,9) = 12.32, P

B0.01). While there was

no difference between control and meditation night AUC during pre-treatment
(F(1,9) = 0.88, P

\0.05), post-treatment melatonin levels were significantly higher

on the meditation night(F(1,9) = 11.12, P

B0.01). Analysis of the yoga group data

G.ATooley et al.

/

Biological Psychology

53 (2000) 69 – 78

75

resulted in similar findings, with a significant treatment by time interaction
(F(1,6) = 6.89, P

B0.05), no difference in pre-treatment levels (F(1,6)=0.25, P\

0.05), and significantly higher post-treatment melatonin AUC on the meditation
night (F(1,6) = 16.19, P

B0.01).

Results indicate that, for both groups of meditators, while pre-treatment plasma

melatonin levels did not differ between control and meditation nights, post-treat-
ment levels were significantly higher following meditation than they were during the
same period on the control night.

4. Discussion

Because the control period entailed sitting quietly with eyes open while medita-

tion was mostly practiced with eyes-closed, it is reasonable to assume that partici-
pants were exposed to more light on the control night. Clearly, this could have
implications with respect to the findings of this study, given that light of sufficient
intensity and duration can have a suppressing effect on melatonin secretion (Lewy
et al., 1980). However, the levels of light exposure during this study (below 15 lux)
were well below the minimum intensity that has been documented to have a
significant effect on melatonin levels (Aoki et al., 1998; McIntyre et al., 1989).

The results of this study support the hypothesis that a period of meditation can

acutely increase night-time plasma melatonin levels. Although a recent pilot study
(Massion et al., 1995) has offered preliminary evidence that meditators may
consistently produce higher levels of melatonin, as far as we can determine, this is
the first demonstration of acute increases in plasma melatonin levels as a result of
a behavioural intervention. These increases are impressive given that there are no
known substances which will reliably increase melatonin other than some classes of
psychotropic drugs such as monoamine-oxidase A inhibitors (Murphy et al., 1986).

The mechanism by which meditation might induce an increase in plasma mela-

tonin levels is uncertain. However, reduced hepatic blood flow has been reported to
occur during meditation (Jevning et al., 1978a,b) and this may well slow the rate of
melatonin metabolism, leading to higher plasma levels of the hormone. A mecha-
nism by which meditation might lead to increased production and secretion of
melatonin by the pineal is difficult to hypothesise at this stage, however other
investigators have demonstrated that meditation can increase blood levels of
noradrenaline (Lang et al., 1979) and urine levels of the serotonin metabolite
5HIAA (Bujatti and Riederer, 1976). Melatonin is synthesised in the pineal from
serotonin, and the process is stimulated by noradrenaline acting on beta-adrenergic
receptors on the pinealocytes (Moore, 1978).

Regardless of the mechanism, higher plasma levels of melatonin at the appropri-

ate time of day could, theoretically, have a health promoting effect, for example, by
prolonging its antioxidant activity. But the finding that melatonin is increased after
meditation at midnight should not be interpreted as meaning that this occurs
whenever a person meditates. Indeed, in the yoga literature it is usually suggested
that meditation should be carried out in the early morning or evening. These are

G.ATooley et al.

/

Biological Psychology

53 (2000) 69 – 78

76

times when melatonin levels are low, being likely to either have just fallen or about
to rise. It may be that melatonin levels can be increased at these times, however it
is both unlikely and undesirable, from a physiologic standpoint, that the hormone
would be released during daytime as a result of meditation, since activity of the rate
limiting enzyme, N-acetyl transferase, is low (Klein, 1985) and light would inhibit
the release of the hormone even if its synthesis did occur (Klein, 1985). Further-
more, the health benefits of meditation are expected to accrue over years of
practice, rather than from single episodes, and an effect on plasma melatonin levels
is likely to be just one of the mechanisms by which meditation can have a positive
effect on the well-being of practitioners.

The results of the present study raise the possibility that it is via the pineal and

its principal hormone, melatonin, that at least some of the health benefits claimed
for meditation could occur. It has been suggested previously that the TM Sidhi
program may act as a zeitgeber for synchronised hormone release (Werner et al.,
1986), and it is perhaps through an effect on melatonin, which is postulated as a
mammalian internal zeitgeber (Armstrong, 1989), that it might achieve this.

Clearly, further research is required to establish the acute effects of meditation on

melatonin levels at different times of the day, particularly at the time it is normally
practiced. Research should also focus on comparing the effects of meditation with
those of other relaxation strategies that are more active than simple eyes-closed rest,
such as biofeedback and progressive muscle relaxation. Researchers might also look
at the different yogic techniques within meditation to assess whether any of these is
particularly capable of affecting melatonin levels.

References

Aoki, H., Yamada, N., Ozeki, Y., Yamane, H., Kato, N., 1998. Minimum light intensity required to

suppress nocturnal melatonin concentration in human saliva. Neurosci. Lett. 252, 91 – 94.

Arendt, J., 1986. Role of the pineal gland in seasonal reproductive function in mammals. In: Clarke, J.R.

(Ed.), Oxford Reviews of Reproductive Biology. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, pp. 266 – 320.

Arendt, J., 1995. Melatonin and the Mammalian Pineal Gland. Chapman and Hall, London.
Armstrong, S.M., 1989. Melatonin. the internal zeitgeber of mammals? Pineal Res. Rev. 7, 157 – 202.
Bujatti, M., Riederer, P., 1976. Serotonin, noradrenaline, dopamine metabolites in transcendental

meditation technique. J. Neural Trans. 39, 257 – 267.

Fraser, S., Cowen, P., Franklin, M., Franey, C., Arendt, J., 1983. Direct radioimmunoassay for

melatonin in plasma. Clin. Chem. 29, 396 – 399.

Gupta, D., Attanasio, A., Reiter, R.J., 1988. The Pineal Gland and Cancer. Tubingen, Bass.
Jevning, R., Wallace, R.K., Beidbach, M., 1992. The physiology of meditation: a review. a wakeful

hypometabolic intergrated response. Neurosci. Biobehav. Rev. 16, 415 – 424.

Jevning, R., Wilson, A.F., Davidson, J.M., 1978a. Adrenocortical activity during meditation. Hormones

Behav. 10, 54 – 60.

Jevning, R., Wilson, A.F., Smith, W.R., Morton, M.E., 1978b. Redistribution of blood flow in acute

hypometabolic behaviour. Am. J. Physiol. 235, R89 – R92.

Jimmerson, D.C., Lynch, H.J., Post, R.M., Wurtman, R.J., Bunney, W.E., 1977. Urinary melatonin

rhythms during sleep deprivation in depressed patients and normals. Life Sci. 20, 1501.

Klein, D.C., 1985. Photoneural regulation of the mammalian pineal gland. In: Evered, D., Clarke, S.

(Eds.), Photoperiodism, Melatonin and the Pineal. Pitman, London, pp. 38 – 51.

G.ATooley et al.

/

Biological Psychology

53 (2000) 69 – 78

77

Lang, R., Dehof, K., Meurer, K.A., Kaufmann, W., 1979. Sympathetic activity and transcendental

meditation. J. Neural Trans. 44, 117 – 135.

Lerner, A.B., Case, J.B., Takahashi, Y., Lee, T.H., Mori, W.H., 1958. Isolation of melatonin, the pineal

gland factor that lightens melanocytes. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 80, 2587.

Lewy, A.J., Wehr, T.A., Goodwin, F.K., Newsome, D.R., Markey, S.P., 1980. Light suppresses

melatonin secretion in humans. Science 210, 1267 – 1269.

MacLean, C.R., Walton, K.G., Wenneberg, S.R., et al., 1997. Effects of the transcendental meditation

program on adaptive mechanisms: changes in hormone levels and responses to stress after 4 months
of practice. Psychoneuroendocrinology 22, 277 – 295.

Maestroni, G.J.M., Conti, A., Pierpaoli, W., 1986. Role of the pineal gland in immunity. J. Neuroim-

munol. 13, 19 – 30.

Maestroni, G.J.M., Conti, A., Pierpaoli, W., 1988. Pineal melatonin, its fundamental role in aging and

cancer. Ann. NY Acad. Sci. 521, 140 – 148.

Massion, A.O., Teas, J., Herbert, R., Wertheimer, M.D., Kabat-Zinn, J., 1995. Meditation, melatonin

and breast/prostate cancer: hypotheses and preliminary data. Med. Hyp. 44, 39 – 46.

McIntyre, I., Norman, T.R., Burrows, G.D., Armstrong, S.M., 1988. Human melatonin suppression by

light is intensity dependent. J. Pineal Res. 6, 149 – 156.

McIntyre, I.M., Norman, T.R., Burrows, G.D., Armstrong, S.M., 1989. Quantal suppression of

melatonin by exposure to low intensity light in man. Life Sci. 45, 327 – 332.

Meares, A., 1979. Regression of cancer of the rectum after intensive meditation. Med. J. Australia 2,

539 – 540.

Michaels, R.R., Huber, J.S., McCann, D.S., 1976. Evaluation of transcendental meditation as a method

of reducing stress. Science 192, 1242 – 1244.

Monteleone, P., Fuschino, A., Nolfe, G., Maj, M., 1992. Temporal relationship between melatonin and

cortisol responses to nighttime physical stress in humans. Psychoneuroendocrinology 17, 81 – 86.

Moore, R.Y., 1978. The innervation of the mammalian pineal gland. Prog. Reprod. Biol. 4, 1 – 29.
Moore, R.Y., Eichler, V.B., 1972. Loss of a circadian adrenal corticosterone rhythm following

suprachiasmatic lesions in the rat. Brain Res. 42, 201 – 206.

Morse, D.R., Martin, J.S., Furst, M.L., Dubin, L.L., 1977. A physiological and subjective evaluation of

meditation, hypnosis and relaxation. Psycho. Med. 39, 304 – 324.

Murphy, D.L., Garrick, N.A., Tamarkin, L., Taylor, P.L., Markey, S.P., 1986. Effects of antidepressant

and other psychotropic drugs on melatonin release and pineal gland function. J. Neural Trans. 21,
291 – 309.

Norman, T.R., McIntyre I., Armstrong, S.M., Unpublished material
Pagano, R.R., Rose, R.M., Stivers, R.M., Warrenberg, S., 1976. Sleep during transcendental meditation.

Science 191, 308 – 309.

Panzer, A., Viljoen, M., 1997. The validity of melatonin as an oncostatic agent. J. Pineal Res. 22 (4),

184 – 202.

Pierpaoli, W., 1998. Neuroimmunomodulation of aging. a program in the pineal gland. Ann. NY Acad.

Sci. 840, 491 – 497.

Pierpaoli, W., Maestroni, G.J.M., 1987. Melatonin a principle neuroimmunoregulatory and anti-stress

hormone: its anti-aging effects. Immunol. Lett. 16, 355 – 362.

Reiter, R., Tang, L., Garcia, J.J., Munoz-Hoy, S.A., 1997. Pharmacological actions of melatonin in

oxygen radical pathophysiology. Life Sci. 60, 2255 – 2271.

Shapiro, D.H., 1982. Overview: clinical and physiological comparison of meditation with other self-con-

trol strategies. Am. J. Psych. 139, 267 – 273.

Solberg, E.E., Halvorsen, R., Sundgot Borgen, J., Ingjer, F., Holen, A., 1995. Meditatin: a modulator

of the immune response to physical stress? a brief report. Br. J. Sports Med. 29 (4), 255 – 257.

Stephan, F.K., Zucker, I., 1972. Circadian rhythms in drinking behaviour and locomotor activity in rats

are eliminated by hypothalamic lesions. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 69, 1583 – 1586.

Trinder, J., Armstrong, S.M., O’Brien, C., Luke, D., Martin, M., 1996. Inhibition of melatonin secretion

onset by low levels of illumination. J. Sleep Res. 5, 77 – 82.

Van Reeth, O., Sturis, J., Byrne, M.M., et al., 1994. Nocturnal exercise phase delays circadian rhythms

of melatonin and thyrotropin secretion in normal men. Am. J. Physiol. 266, 964 – 974.

G.ATooley et al.

/

Biological Psychology

53 (2000) 69 – 78

78

Vaughan, G.M., 1986. Human melatonin in physiologic and diseased states: neural control of the

rhythm. In: Wurtman, R.J., Waldhauser, F. (Eds.), Melatonin in Humans. Springer-Verlag, Wein,
pp. 199 – 215.

Vaughan, G.M., Bell, R., De La Pena, A., 1979. Nocturnal plasma melatonin in humans: episodic

pattern and influence of light. Neurosci. Lett. 14, 81 – 84.

Vaughan, G.M., Pelham, R.W., Pang, S.F., et al., 1976. Nocturnal elevation of plasma melatonin and

urinary 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid in young men: attempts at modification by brief changes in
environmental lighting and sleep and by autonomic drugs. J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. 42, 752.

Wallace, R.K., 1970. Physiological effects of transcendental meditation. Science 167, 1751 – 1754.
Wallace, R.K., 1989. The Neurophysiology Of Enlightenment. Maharishi International University Press,

Fairfield.

Wallace, R.K., Dillbeck, M.C., Jacobe, E., Harrington, B., 1982. The effects of the transcendental

meditation and TM-Sidhi program on the aging process. Int. J. Neurosci. 16, 53 – 58.

Werner, O.R., Wallace, R.K., Charles, B., et al., 1986. Long-term endocrinologic changes in subjects

practising the Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi program. Psycho. Med. 48, 59 – 66.

.