JPineal Res.

2001; 30:65 – 74

Mini Review

Melatonin, mitochondria, and cellular
bioenergetics

Abstract: Aerobic cells use oxygen for the production of 90 – 95% of
the total amount of ATP that they use. This amounts to about 40 kg
ATP/day in an adult human. The synthesis of ATP via the
mitochondrial respiratory chain is the result of electron transport
across the electron transport chain coupled to oxidative
phosphorylation. Although ideally all the oxygen should be reduced to
water by a four-electron reduction reaction driven by the cytochrome
oxidase, under normal conditions a small percentage of oxygen may be
reduced by one, two, or three electrons only, yielding superoxide anion,
hydrogen peroxide, and the hydroxyl radical, respectively. The main
radical produced by mitochondria is superoxide anion and the
intramitochondrial antioxidant systems should scavenge this radical to
avoid oxidative damage, which leads to impaired ATP production.
During aging and some neurodegenerative diseases, oxidatively
damaged mitochondria are unable to maintain the energy demands of
the cell leading to an increased production of free radicals. Both
processes, i.e., defective ATP production and increased oxygen radicals,
may induce mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic cell death. Melatonin
has been reported to exert neuroprotective effects in several
experimental and clinical situations involving neurotoxicity and/or
excitotoxicity. Additionally, in a series of pathologies in which high
production of free radicals is the primary cause of the disease,
melatonin is also protective. A common feature in these diseases is the
existence of mitochondrial damage due to oxidative stress. The
discoveries of new actions of melatonin in mitochondria support a
novel mechanism, which explains some of the protective effects of the
indoleamine on cell survival.

Darı´o Acun˜a-Castroviejo

1

,

Miguel Martı´n

1

, Manuel Macı´as

1

,

Germaine Escames

1

, Josefa Leo´n

1

,

Huda Khaldy

1

and Russel J. Reiter

2

1

Departamento de Fisiologı´a, Instituto de

Biotecnologı´a, Universidad de Granada,
Granada, Spain;

2

Department of Cellular and

Structural Biology, The University of Texas
Health Science Center at San Antonio, San
Antonio, Texas

Key words: ATP – electron transport chain

– free radicals – melatonin – mitochondria
– oxidative phosphorylation – oxidative

stress

Russel J. Reiter, Ph.D., Department of Cellu-
lar and Structural Biology, The University of
Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio,
Mail Code 7762, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San
Antonio, Texas 78229-3900.
E-mail: reiter@uthscsa.edu

Received August 19, 2000;
accepted October 4, 2000.

Introduction

A major success of phylogenetic adaptation is
aerobic metabolism. Remarkably, more than 90%
of the body’s oxygen (O

2

) consumption is utilized

by a single enzyme, cytochrome oxidase (C-IV)
[Nathan and Singer, 1999]. Aerobic organisms use
ATP generated by an oxidative phosphorylation
(OXPHOS) pathway involving a multienzymatic
process, which includes C-IV as an electron accep-
tor. Normally, there is no shortage of ATP pro-
duction under aerobic conditions, since the
amount of O

2

delivered to the tissues (100 mL/

min) is in excess to the body’s requirements. This
situation is reversed when sufficient oxygen is
available to the mitochondria, but they are unable
to utilize it due to an inhibition at any of several
points in the electron transport chain (ETC). Such
disturbances are common to aging and several
pathologies, including neurodegenerative diseases,
ischemia/reperfusion, and sepsis, where an in-

crease in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reac-
tive nitrogen species (RNS), including superoxide
anion (O

2

’), hydrogen peroxide (H

2

O

2

), hydroxyl

radical (HO’), nitric oxide (NO) and peroxynitrite
(ONOO

), inhibit ETC complexes [Murphy,

1989; Beal, 1998; Lenaz, 1998; Bockowski et al.,
1999].

Mitochondria are surrounded by a double sys-

tem of membranes described as outer and inner
membranes, which define two soluble compart-
ments, the intermembrane space and the matrix.
Their matrices contain ribosomes for protein syn-
thesis, their own genome, the enzymes of the

b-ox-

idation pathway, and the majority of the enzymes
needed for the Krebs cycle. An important excep-
tion is succinate dehydrogenase, which is linked to
the ETC in the inner membrane. Mitochondria
specialize in the rapid oxidation of NADH and
FADH through the ETC to produce ATP. The
ETC is constituted by four complexes and the
electron transfer from one complex to another is

65

Printed in Ireland — all rights reser

7ed.

Acun˜a-Castroviejo et al.

driven by the reduced forms of the ubiquinone
(UQ) and cytochrome c (cyt c) [de Grey, 1999].
During this electron transfer, O

2

may be partially

reduced, yielding ROS. This review mainly centers
on how melatonin counteracts ROS production by
mitochondria, thereby improving OXPHOS.

Mitochondrial production of ATP

In cells under aerobic conditions, OXPHOS is
responsible for production of 90 – 95% of the total
amount of ATP, the remainder being synthesized
by glycolytic phosphorylation. The adult human
forms and decomposes about 40 kg ATP/day
[Skulachev, 1999]. NADH + H

+

and FADH

2

pro-

duced by glycolysis, Krebs cycle, and

b-oxidation

of fatty acids are oxidized by the ETC transferring
electrons from these precursors to O

2

. The ETC

comprises a series of reduction/oxidation reactions
involving complex I (NADH dehydrogenase), II
(succinate dehydrogenase), III (cyt c reductase),
and IV (cytochrome oxidase). The synthesis of
ATP via the respiratory chain is the result of two
coupled processes: electron transport and OX-
PHOS. Electrons from NADH + H

+

enter C-I of

the ETC at a redox potential of − 0.30 V and
emerge

to

reduce

a

membrane-associated

ubiquinone/ubiquinol (UQ/UQH

2

) pool to + 0.10

V. Electrons from FADH

2

have an insufficient

negative redox potential to enter C-I and instead
reduce the UQ/UQH

2

pool via C-II. UQH

2

trans-

fers electrons to C-III, which in turn reduces cyt c
at a redox potential of + 0.254 V. Cyt c then
reduces the terminal acceptor C-IV, which then
transfers four electrons to molecular O

2

forming

H

2

O. C-I, C-III, and C-IV function as proton

pumps, acting in series with respect to the electron
flux and in parallel with respect to the proton
circuit [Nicholls and Budd, 2000]. The fall in the
redox potential of electrons passing through these
complexes is used to generate a proton electro-
chemical potential gradient,

Dm

H

+ , usually ex-

pressed

in

electrical

potential

units

as

the

proton-motive force (

Dp). At 37°C, Dp=DC

m

DpH, where DC

m

is mitochondrial membrane po-

tential and

DpH is pH gradient across the inner

membrane. Under most conditions,

DC

m

is the

dominant component of

Dp, accounting for 150–

180 mV of the total

Dp of 200–220 mV. A fourth

component of the inner mitochondrial membrane,
the energy-linked transhydrogenase, utilizes

Dp to

maintain a high level of reduction of the matrix
NADPH pool by driving the following reaction to
the

right:

NADH

+

+ NADP = NAD

+

+

NADPH. In a typical mitochondrion, the NAD
pool is about 10% reduced while the NADP pool

is more than 90% reduced [Nicholls and Budd,
2000].

ATP synthase is the dominant pathway for the

reentry of protons into the mitochondrial matrix.
The electron flux and thus respiration are con-
trolled by ATP demand, which is referred to as the
‘respiratory control’. A collapse in

Dp leads not

only to a cessation of mitochondrial ATP synthe-
sis, but to a rapid hydrolysis of cytoplasmic ATP
as the ATP synthase reverses in an attempt to
restore

Dp. This can lead to a profound ATP

depletion. The

Dp is the central parameter con-

trolling fundamental cellular processes: ATP syn-
thesis, mitochondrial Ca

2 +

uptake, and ROS

generation.

Mitochondria possess a constitutive proton leak

across their inner membrane [Murphy, 1989]. This
leak is highly potential-dependent, but above a

Dp\180 mV, it becomes independent of Dp. This
nonohmic leak plays a major role in controlling
basal metabolic rate and, in addition, may limit
the production of potentially dangerous ROS.

Mitochondrial production of ROS and RNS

Most of the O

2

taken up by human cells is reduced

to water via the action of mitochondrial C-IV.
This requires the addition of four electrons to each
O

2

molecule. The intermediate steps of O

2

reduc-

tion result in the formation of O

2

’, H

2

O

2

, and

HO’, corresponding to reduction by one, two, and
three electrons, respectively. The HO’ is tremen-
dously reactive, since its redox potential is more
positive than any substance in the living cell ( +
1.35 V). It seems that ubisemiquinone (UQ’) could
be responsible for ROS generation both at C-I and
C-III level [Barja, 1999]. As well as being able to
generate O

2

’ and H

2

O

2

, mitochondria are them-

selves susceptible to damage by these compounds.
NAD(P)H is responsible for maintaining the ma-
trix glutathione pool in the reduced form via glu-
tathione reductase (GRd). Since the NAD(P)H
pool is maintained in a highly reduced state by
means of the

Dp-driven energy-linked transhydro-

genases, the magnitude of

Dp may be critical for

mitochondrial survival. If it is too high, C-III will
generate ROS, and if it is too low, ATP levels are
reduced and the NAD(P)H pool becomes oxidized
[Nicholls and Budd, 2000].

Mitochondria possess a special mechanism

called mild uncoupling that prevents a marked
increase in

Dp and, hence, O

2

’ formation. Mild

uncoupling seems to be a first line of mitochon-
drial antioxidant defense since it reduces O

2

’ gen-

eration [Skulachev, 1999]. If, nevertheless, some
O

2

’ is still formed, the next line of defense is

66

Melatonin, mitochondria, and ATP

activated. This role is carried out by cyt c dis-
solved in the solution occupying the intermem-
brane space of mitochondria. Cyt c oxidizes O

2

’

back to O

2

(cyt c

3 +

+ O

2

’=cyt c

2 +

+ O

2

),

whereas reduced cyt c can then be oxidized by O

2

via C-IV (4 cyt c

2 +

+ O

2

+ 4H

+

= 4 cyt c

3 +

+

2H

2

O). This mechanism represents the most effec-

tive way to scavenge O

2

’, since it is merely

converted back to O

2

[Skulachev, 1999]. Antioxi-

dants, such as ascorbate, UQ, and

a-tocopherol,

may assist the mitochondrial antioxidative defense
system, but none of them can convert O

2

’ to O

2

.

An important role is also played by superoxide
dismutase (SOD), which converts O

2

’ to H

2

O

2

,

which in turn is converted to water via the enzyme
glutathione peroxidase (GPx) which, in the process
metabolizes reduced glutathione (GSH) to its
disulfide (GSSG). All O

2

reduction ceases when

the hydrogen supply to the ETC is abolished. This
type of anti-ROS defense may be employed when
ROS increase markedly [Skulachev, 1999].

GSH participates in several redox reactions and

maintains the permeability transition pore (PTP)
closed by the reduction of SH groups in its inner
face. The redox cycling of GSH in mitochondria is
normally very active to avoid significant lost of
GSH. Mitochondrial NO mainly inhibits C-IV
causing a reversible inhibition competing with O

2

for its binding site. Normal tissue levels of NO
and O

2

are 100 – 500 nM and 30 M, respectively.

This ratio of NO/O

2

causes approximately half-

maximal inhibition of mitochondrial respiration
rate, suggesting that NO serves to tonically inhibit
respiration [Brown, 1999]. But NO also reacts with
O

2

’ to form ONOO

, which causes irreversible

inhibition of mitochondrial respiration thereby
damaging all components of the ETC. Also,
ONOO

induces mitochondrial swelling, depolar-

ization, Ca

2 +

release, PTP activation, and apopto-

sis [Brown, 1999].

Mitochondria are also of central importance for

physiological Ca

2 +

handling. They act as a reser-

voir for Ca

2 +

, provide much of that used by

Ca

2 +

-ATPases, and Ca

2 +

regulates the activity of

intramitochondrial dehydrogenases. The inner mi-
tochondrial membrane possesses a

Dp-linked

uniporter to transport Ca

2 +

into the matrix. Thus,

Ca

2 +

overload produces collapse of

Dp, mito-

chondrial swelling, loss of respiratory control, and
release of matrix Ca

2 +

caused by PTP opening

[Nicholls and Budd, 2000]. Besides Ca

2 +

, ROS are

the major PTP regulators. When the production of
ROS increases, they may induce PTP opening and
molecules up to 1.5 kDa are released from mito-
chondria into cytoplasm. Among them, cyt c be-
comes part of the so-called apoptosome that

interacts with procaspase 9 producing the autoac-
tivation of procaspase 9. In turn, caspase 9 prote-
olytically converts procaspase 3 to caspase 3,
which attacks some other key proteins resulting in
controlled cell death [Crompton, 1999].

Mitochondrial pathologies

Abnormalities

of

mitochondrial

metabolism,

which cause human disease, have been recognized
for more than 30 years. They encompass defects of
fatty acid oxidation, Krebs cycle enzymes, and the
ETC and OXPHOS system. The study of mito-
chondrial metabolism has recently increased in
neurodegenerative diseases [Beal, 1998; Schapira,
1999]. Some of these pathologies included Parkin-
son’s disease (deficiency of C-I), Huntington’s dis-
ease (deficiencies in the C-II, C-III, and C-IV)
[Schapira, 1999], Alzheimer’s disease (mitochon-
drial dysfunction and down-regulation of the mi-
tochondrial ETC and

b-amyloid-induced oxidative

damage), and Friedreich’s ataxia (impaired OX-
PHOS in skeletal muscle) [Beal, 1998]. The partial-
dependence of oxidative damage in these diseases
suggests the use of antioxidants in their treatment
[Schapira, 1999].

During ischemia/reperfusion, damage induced

by anoxia seems to be related to subsequent reoxy-
genation, which induces HO’ responsible for the
initiation of an apoptotic program opening the
PTP [Crompton, 1999]. NO generated during
reperfusion due to NOS activation, and the
ONOO − produced when NO couples with O

2

’

seems to be the primary cause of damage to C-I
and C-II during reperfusion.

Glutamate is the main excitatory amino acid in

the mammalian brain. Glutamate exposure (exci-
totoxicity) results in a massive intracellular accu-
mulation of Ca

2 +

that may be taken up by

mitochondria with the subsequent decrease of

Dp

and ATP synthesis, and an increase in O

2

’ and

H

2

O

2

generated by mitochondria and a rise in

ONOO − produced from NO generated by cyto-
solic and mitochondrial NOS [Nicholls and Budd,
2000]. A significant reduction in mitochondrial
GSH pool occurs during excitotoxicity.

Sepsis is a severe toxic state due to an abnormal

immune response against bacterial infection in an
organ, leading to iNOS induction and massive
tissue damage. The mechanisms of NO-induced
toxicity depend in part on the reversible inhibition
of C-IV [Brown, 1999] and in increases of O

2

’

and H

2

O

2

production by mitochondria of the di-

aphragm. A parallel increase in ONOO − also
impairs mitochondrial function and muscle con-
tractility [Bockowski et al., 1999]. To prevent the

67

Acun˜a-Castroviejo et al.

progression of sepsis, NOS antagonists and an-
tioxidants have been used.

Aging is a complex process characterized as

degenerative in nature, which causes progressive
loss of function and an increased risk of death.
The free radical theory of aging proposed by Har-
man [1956] suggests that aging is the result of the
failure of various protective mechanisms to coun-
teract the ROS-induced damage. The mitochon-
drial theory of aging states that the accumulation
of impaired mitochondria is the driving force of
the aging process [Miquel et al., 1980]. Aging is
accompanied by structural changes in mitochon-
dria and by a decrease in C-IV and C-V activities,
which results in a bioenergetic decline that may
impair energy-dependent neurotransmission, con-
tributing to a senescent decline in memory and
other brain functions [de Grey, 1999]. Oxidative
stress represents an early intrinsic component of
any PTP-induced apoptotic cascade [Loeffler and
Kroemer,

2000].

Unifying

programmed

and

stochastic theories of aging claim that cells are first
programmed to differentiate, and then they suffer
progressive disorganization because of injury as
the result of chronic oxidative stress. The free
radical theory of aging also provides a rationale
for intervention by means of antioxidant adminis-
tration [Sastre et al., 2000].

Melatonin and ROS and RNS

From a phylogenetic point of view, melatonin is a
molecule present in organisms from unicells to
mammals. Since tryptophan and serotonin (mela-
tonin precursors) are present at the early stages of
cell phylogeny, the presence of melatonin is also
suggested.

Tryptophan

metabolites,

including

melatonin are antioxidants, and from a hypotheti-
cal point of view, the first function of melatonin
may have been as an antioxidant. Melatonin, iden-
tified initially in the pineal gland [Lerner et al.,
1958] was considered for several decades as a
regulator of reproduction, mainly in seasonal-
breeding animals [Reiter, 1980]. The discovery of
different targets in the cell suggests a variety of
mechanisms of action for this compound. At the
present, melatonin’s mechanisms of action seem to
fall

into

three

categories:

receptor-mediated,

protein-mediated, and non-receptor-mediated ef-
fects. Receptor-mediated melatonin events involve
both membrane and nuclear receptors. Although
membrane melatonin receptors have been iden-
tified and are well-characterized in humans [Con-
way et al., 2000], some of the receptor-related
antioxidant effects of melatonin seem also to be
related to its nuclear receptors [Acun˜a-Castroviejo

et al., 1994; Becker-Andre´ et al., 1994; Garcı´a-
Maurin˜o et al., 2000]. The expression of some
enzymes, mainly related to the endogenous antiox-
idant system of the cell, such as GPx, GRd, SOD,
and iNOS [Antolı´n et al., 1996; Crespo et al.,
1999], are under genomic regulation by melatonin.
The interaction between membrane and nuclear
melatonin signaling has been proposed [Carlberg
and Wiesenberg, 1995].

Experimental evidence has clearly demonstrated

the interaction of melatonin with Ca

2 +

-calmod-

ulin (CaCaM), a ubiquitous protein in the cell.
High-affinity binding of melatonin to CaM has
been characterized [Romero et al., 1998]. The sig-
nificance of melatonin – CaCaM interaction was
emphasized in a series of experiments showing
changes in the cytoskeletal rearrangements due to
this interaction [Benı´tez-King, 2000]. Also, the
binding of melatonin to CaCaM inhibits intracel-
lular CaCaM-dependent enzymes, such as NOS
[Leo´n et al., 2000]. Hence, melatonin inhibits NO
production.

A series of experiments have provided strong

evidence for the anti-excitotoxic properties of
melatonin both in vivo and in vitro [Acun˜a-
Castroviejo et al., 1995]. Both experimental and
clinical anticonvulsant activity of melatonin was
reported [Molina-Carballo et al., 1997; Lapin et
al., 1998]. Reduced melatonin levels are related to
increased brain damage after stroke or excitotoxic
seizures in rats [Manev et al., 1996], whereas mela-
tonin protected the brain against kainic acid or
quinolinic acid oxidative damage [Melchiorri et
al., 1995; Tan et al., 1998; Cabrera et al., 2000].
Electrophysiological experiments further demon-
strated the antagonism of melatonin against the
NMDA-induced excitotoxicity, an effect involving
the inhibition of the nNOS [Escames et al., 1996;
Leo´n et al., 1998, 2000]. Melatonin also counter-
acts oxidative damage in MPTP-induced Parkin-
son’s disease [Acun˜a-Castroviejo et al., 1997], and
in vitro melatonin was more potent than vitamins
E and C, and

L

-deprenyl in blocking dopamine

(DA) autoxidation [Khaldy et al., 2000]. Paraquat,
an MPTP-related molecule, also produces strong
oxidative damage when administered to animals.
To the same extent as in the MPTP model, mela-
tonin

counteracted

paraquat-induced

damage

[Melchiorri et al., 1998]. The neuroprotective ef-
fects of melatonin were also tested against neu-
rodegenerative

manifestations

of

Alzheimer’s

amyloid

b-protein and showed antiapoptotic and

ROS scavenging properties [Pappolla et al., 2000].

In a model of ischemia/reperfusion in gerbil due

to bilateral carotid artery occlusion, NOS/NO sys-
tem was inhibited after melatonin administration,

68

Melatonin, mitochondria, and ATP

resulting in a reduction of neuronal damage asso-
ciated with reperfusion [Guerrero et al., 1997].
Protection by melatonin in other models of neuro-
toxicity, including hyperbaric hyperoxia-exposed
rats, cyanide-induced seizures in rats, and d-
amino-levulinic acid-induced neuronal damage in
rat brain homogenates, was also provided [Reiter
et al., 1997a, 1998; Reiter, 1998]. In experimental
models of sepsis induced by administration of
lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to rats, melatonin ad-
ministration reportedly counteracted most of the
markers of cell injury, including the inhibition of
iNOS expression and subsequent NO production
[Sewerynek et al., 1995; Crespo et al., 1999]. Mela-
tonin also protects against oxidative damage in-
duced by a variety of free radical generating
agents, including the carcinogen safrole, Fenton
reagents, glutathione depletion, carbon tetrachlo-
ride, and ionizing radiation [Karbownik and Re-
iter, 2000; Reiter, 2000]. Melatonin is also effective
in protecting nuclear DNA, membrane lipids, and
cytosolic proteins from oxidative damage and
from increased membrane rigidity [Reiter et al.,
1997b, 1998; Garcı´a et al., 1999].

The protective properties of melatonin have

been tested in several models of aging, which in-
volve extensive cell damage. In different models of
aging, including a relative melatonin deficiency,
and in age-related diseases, such as cancer and
cataracts, melatonin administration has been
shown to be protective [Reiter et al., 1999; Reiter,
1999]. The fact that melatonin decreases with age
has been suggest as contributing to aging in mam-
mals [Reiter, 1998].

The experimental and clinical situations summa-

rized above have three main features: 1) high ROS
production, 2) mitochondrial pathology as a con-
sequence of oxidative damage, and 3) beneficial
effects of melatonin as evidenced by a reduction in
lipid peroxidation, DNA damage, and NO levels,
and increased GSH and thus a rise in the GSH/
GSSG ratio [Reiter, 1998; Reiter et al., 1998,
2000]. Collectively, the data demonstrate that
melatonin efficiently counteracts oxygen radical
pathology. The antioxidant properties of mela-
tonin

involve

its

scavenging

of

HO’,

NO,

ONOO

, and possibly O

2

’ [Reiter et al., 2000;

Tan et al., 2000a]. Also of importance, melatonin
was recently shown to scavenge H

2

O

2

, the precur-

sor of the HO’, which is formed during normal
metabolism of mitochondria [Tan et al., 2000a,b].
Melatonin also reportedly regulates the expression
and activity of the antioxidative enzymes GPx,
GRd, SOD, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase
(G-6-PDH), and iNOS [Antolı´n et al., 1996; Cre-
spo et al., 1999; Reiter et al., 2000]. In contrast to

vitamins E and C, melatonin does not deplete the
main reductive force of the cell, GSH, rather it
prevents or even increases the content of GSH.
When melatonin scavenges H

2

O

2

, the resulting

metabolites, i.e., N

1

-acetyl-N

2

-formyl-5-methoxy

kynuramine (AFMK) and N-acetyl-5-methoxy
kynuramine (AMK), also are effective free radical
scavengers. The continuous ROS scavenging po-
tential of melatonin and its metabolites has been
defined as a scavenging cascade reaction [Reiter et
al., 2000; Tan et al., 2000a,b].

The importance of melatonin as an antioxidant

depends on several characteristics: its lipophilic
and hydrophilic nature, its ability to pass all bio-
barriers with ease, and its availability to all tissues
and cells. It distributes in all cell compartments,
being especially high in the nucleus and mitochon-
dria [Mene´ndez-Pela´ez et al., 1993; Martı´n et al.,
2000a]. In mammals, the pineal gland is one of
several organs that produce melatonin. Other tis-
sues, including the retina, cells of the immune
system, gut, bone marrow, human ovary, lens, and
testes, may produce melatonin for local use [Reiter
et al., 2000]. Levels of melatonin are two to three
orders of magnitude higher than maximal blood
melatonin concentrations in bile [Tan et al., 1999]
and in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) [Skinner and
Malpaux, 1999]. Thus, some organs may produce
melatonin making them independent of circulating
levels of the indoleamine. Physiological levels of
melatonin should not be exclusively defined in
terms of the concentrations of melatonin normally
found in the blood.

Melatonin and mitochondria

Two main considerations suggest a role for mela-
tonin in mitochondrial homeostasis. First, mito-
chondria produce high amounts of ROS and
RNS. Second, mitochondria depend on the GSH
uptake from the cytoplasm, although they have
GPx and GRd to maintain GSH redox cycling.
Thus, the antioxidant effect of melatonin and its
ability to increase GSH levels [Urata et al., 1999]
may be of great importance for mitochondrial
physiology. The fact that the toxicity of cyanide,
which blocks C-IV of the mitochondrial ETC, is
counteracted by melatonin, also supports its in-
tramitochondrial role [Yamamoto and Tang,
1996].

Binding

experiments

with

125

Iodomelatonin

showed most of the specific binding (39%) to be
present in the mitochondrial fraction of the cell
[Poon and Pang, 1992]. Soon thereafter, a
metabolic effect of melatonin on mitochondrial
metabolic activity was reported [De Atenor et al.,

69

Acun˜a-Castroviejo et al.

1994].

Also,

melatonin

added

to

J774

macrophages in culture reduced the suppression of
mitochondrial respiration induced by ONOO

[Gilad et al., 1997]. Melatonin also reduced cell
death induced by cysteamine pretreatment of
PC12 cells, a mechanism involving mitochondrial
iron sequestration [Frankel and Schipper, 1999].
Furthermore, melatonin inhibited NADPH-depen-
dent LPO in human placental mitochondria [Mil-
czarek et al., 2000] and protected against O

2

’

damaging U937 cells treated with 7-ketocholes-
terol [Lizard et al., 2000]. A protective effect of
melatonin against MPP

+

-induced inhibition of C-

I of the ETC has been also provided [Absi et al.,
2000].

The ability of melatonin to influence mitochon-

drial homeostasis was initially tested in vivo. Rats
were injected ip with melatonin (10 mg/kg) and
sacrificed at different times after treatment. Mito-
chondria from brain and liver tissues were pre-
pared and the activity of the ETC complexes were
measured. Under these conditions, melatonin in-
creased the activity of the C-I and the C-IV of the
mitochondrial ETC in a time-dependent manner,
whereas the C-II and C-III were unaffected. The
effect of melatonin was observed at 30 min after
injection and the activity of these complexes re-
turned to control values at 120 – 180 min after
melatonin treatment [Martı´n et al., 2000a]. These
data correlate well with the half-life of the in-
doleamine, suggesting a direct effect of melatonin
on mitochondria. Subsequently, rats were treated
with ruthenium red, an inorganic polycationic
complex which acts as a non-competitive inhibitor
of the mitochondrial Ca

2 +

uniport uptake system.

Since Ca

2 +

is important for the activation of

several mitochondrial dehydrogenases, ruthenium
red administration produced an obvious impair-
ment of mitochondrial metabolism, including the
reduction of the ETC and ATP synthesis. Also, at
micromolar concentrations ruthenium red is a
prooxidant acting as a Fenton-type reagent by
substituting for Fe

2 +

in the process of degradation

of deoxyribose by H

2

O

2

and generating methyl

radicals by a redox cycling process involving Ru

III

/

Ru

IV

interconversion in the presence of ascorbate

or succinate. Thus, ruthenium red may cause mito-
chondrial uncoupling and cellular oxidative stress.
The former is demonstrated by the inhibition of
the ETC activity, and the latter by a decrease in
the GSH-dependent redox enzymes. After ruthe-
nium red administration in vivo, mitochondria of
rat liver and brain showed a significant inhibition
of the C-I and C-IV of the ETC. These effects
were totally counteracted by melatonin adminis-
tration at the time of ruthenium red injection,

further supporting an intramitochondrial role of
the indoleamine. Melatonin also counteracted the
inhibitory effect of ruthenium red on GPx. These
data also indicate that melatonin counteracts not
only ruthenium red-induced oxidative stress, but
also the uncoupling effect that the toxin causes
[Martı´n et al., 2000a].

The protective effects of melatonin were further

analyzed in isolated mitochondria prepared from
rat brain and liver tissue and compared with those
of other known antioxidants, such as N-acetylcys-
teine (NAC) and vitamins C and E [Martı´n et al.,
2000b]. Oxidative stress was induced by incuba-
tion of mitochondria with t-BHP, which oxidizes
pyridine nucleotides depleting mitochondrial GSH
and inhibiting both GPx and GRd activities
[Aoshima et al., 1999]. In mitochondria incubated
in absence of t-BPH, melatonin (100 nM) signifi-
cantly increased the content of GSH and reduced
the GSSG content. After incubation with t-BHP,
virtually all GSH is oxidized to GSSG, and the
activity of both GPx and GRd are reduced to
practically zero. In this situation, 100 nM mela-
tonin counteracted these effects, restored basal
levels of GSH and the normal activities of both
GPx and GRd. Melatonin also significantly re-
duced the hydroperoxide production. Neither
NAC nor vitamins E and C reversed t-BHP-in-
duced oxidative stress in mitochondria, even
though they were used in much higher concentra-
tions (1 mM) than melatonin [Martı´n et al.,
2000b].

To characterize the effects of melatonin on mi-

tochondrial ETC activity, another set of experi-
ments was done using submitochondrial particles
prepared from mitochondria obtained from rat
liver and brain. Melatonin increased the activity of
the C-I and C-IV in a dose-dependent manner, the
effect being significant at 1 nM. Melatonin also
counteracted cyanide-induced inhibition of the C-
IV, restoring the levels of cyt a + a

3

. These effects

of melatonin were of physiological significance,
since the indoleamine increased the ETC activity
coupled to OXPHOS, which was reflected by an
increase of ATP synthesis, both in normal mito-
chondria and in mitochondria depleted of ATP by
cyanide [Martı´n et al., 2000c].

These results suggest a direct effect of melatonin

on mitochondrial energy metabolism and provide
a new homeostatic mechanism for regulation of
mitochondrial function. The findings also identify
a new mechanism of action of melatonin at the
mitochondrial level. Improvement of mitochon-
drial respiration and ATP synthesis by melatonin
increases the rate of electron transport across the
ETC. In turn, due to the high redox potential of

70

Melatonin, mitochondria, and ATP

melatonin ( − 0.98 V) [Reiter et al., 2000], this
molecule may donate an electron to the C-I of the
ETC. This effect is also supported by the observa-
tions that melatonin is highly lipophilic, and it
may stabilize mitochondrial inner membranes
[Garcı´a et al., 1999]. Melatonin interacts with mi-
crosomal membranes to maintain membrane sta-
bility, an effect that may improve ETC activity.
Melatonin also directly scavenges H

2

O

2

, which is

abundantly produced in mitochondria from O

2

’

[Tan et al., 2000a]. Thus, melatonin improves ETC
and reduces mitochondrial oxidative damage.
Both effects are the basis of increased ATP
production.

Concluding remarks

Considering the reported beneficial effects of mela-
tonin against oxidative stress-related damage in
different animal models and in humans, it is con-
cluded that the beneficial effects of melatonin are
related to an improvement of mitochondrial func-
tion by counteracting mitochondrial oxidative

stress. Thus, melatonin improves the bioenergetics
of the cell, including more efficient nuclear and
mitochondrial genomic repair mechanisms, in-
creasing GSH levels, which may account for the
anti-apoptotic effects of the indoleamine, elevating
ATP production and improving ATP-dependent
functions, including neurotransmission (Fig. 1).
These mechanisms may be the basis for the poten-
tial anti-aging properties of melatonin and indi-
cate that its age-dependent loss and the resulting
increase in oxidative stress may impair mitochon-
dria that in turn produce more ROS increasing cell
damage, which favor aging. Also, many degenera-
tive disorders of the aged have in common an
alteration in mitochondrial physiology. Regardless
of whether the primary cause of mitochondrial
dysfunction is oxidative damage or due to a dis-
turbance in the ETC, the use of melatonin should
be considered to improve mitochondrial energy
supply to the cell. An obvious implication of the
findings summarized herein is that an important
target of melatonin action is at the level of the
mitochondria.

Fig.

1.

Schematic diagram of the hypothesized melatonin involvement in mitochondrial ETC and in ATP synthesis. Melatonin

easily crosses biological membranes (cellular and mitochondrial) to reach the mitochondrial matrix. Hence, the indoleamine
increases the activity of the complexes I and IV of the ETC. Melatonin also influences glutathione redox cycling and increases the
intramitochondrial content of GSH, which in turn improves the efficiency of the ETC. As a consequence of the melatonin’s action
at the level of the mitochondria, electron transfer along the respiratory chain is enhanced promoting ATP synthesis.

71

Acun˜a-Castroviejo et al.

Acknowledgments

This work was partially supported by grant SAF98-0156
from the Ministerio de Educacio´n, Spain. MM is a fellow
from the Universidad de Granada; MM and JL are post-
doctoral fellows of the Ministerio de Educacio´n y Cultura;
GE is a fellow of the Instituto de Salud Carlos III,
Ministerio de Sanidad; HK is a fellow of the Agencia
Espan˜ola de Cooperacio´n Internacional (AECI).

Literature cited

A

BSI

, E., A. A

YALA

, A. M

ACHADO

, J. P

ARRADO

(2000) Pro-

tective effect of melatonin against the 1-methyl-4-phenylpyri-
dinium-induced

inhibition

of

Complex

I

of

the

mitochondrial respiratory chain. J. Pineal Res. 29:40 – 47.

A

CUN

˜ A

-C

ASTROVIEJO

, D., R.J. R

EITER

, A. M

ENE

´ NDEZ

-

P

ELA

´ EZ

, M.I. P

ABLOS

, A. B

URGOS

(1994) Characterization

of high-affinity melatonin binding sites in purified cell nuclei
of rat liver. J. Pineal Res. 16:100 – 112.

A

CUN

˜ A

-C

ASTROVIEJO

, D., G. E

SCAMES

, M. M

AC

AS

, A.

M

UN

˜ OZ

H

OYOS

, A. M

OLINA

C

ARBALLO

, M. A

RAUZO

, R.

M

ONTES

, F. V

IVES

(1995) Cell protective role of melatonin

in the brain. J. Pineal Res. 19:57 – 63.

A

CUN

˜ A

-C

ASTROVIEJO

, D., A. C

OTO

-M

ONTES

, M.G. M

ONTI

,

G.G. O

RTIZ

, R.J. R

EITER

(1997) Melatonin is protective

against MPTP-induced striatal and hippocampal lesions.
Life Sci. 60:PL23 – PL29.

A

NTOLI´N

, I., C. R

ODRIGUEZ

, R.M. S

AINZ

, J.C. M

AYO

, H.

U

RIA

, M.L. K

OTLER

, M.J. R

ODRIGUEZ

-C

OLUNGA

, D. T

O-

LIVIA

, A. M

ENENDEZ

-P

ELAEZ

(1996) Neurohormone mela-

tonin prevents cell damage: Effect on gene expression for
antioxidant enzymes. FASEB J. 10:882 – 890.

A

OSHIMA

, H., K. K

ADOYA

, H. T

ANIGUCHI

, T. S

ATOH

, H.

H

ATANAKA

(1999) Generation of free radicals during the

death of Sacchamomyces cere

6isiae caused by lipid hydroper-

oxide. Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem. 63:1025 – 1031.

B

ARJA

, G. (1999) Mitochondrial oxygen radical generation

and leak: Sites of production in states 4 and 3, organ
specificity, and relation to aging and longevity. J. Bioenerg.
Biomemb. 31:347 – 366.

B

EAL

, M.F. (1998) Mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegen-

erative diseases. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1366:211 – 223.

B

ECKER

-A

NDRE

´

, M., I. W

IESENBERG

, N. S

CHAEREN

-W

IEN-

BERS

, E. A

NDRE

´

, M. M

ISSBACH

, J.H. S

AURAT

, C. C

ARL-

BERG

(1994) Pineal gland hormone melatonin binds and

activates an orphan of the nuclear receptor superfamily. J.
Biol. Chem. 269:28531 – 28534.

B

ENI´TEZ

-K

ING

, G. (2000) PKC activation by melatonin mod-

ulates vimentin intermediate filament organization in N1E-
115 cells. J. Pineal Res. 29:8 – 14.

B

OCKOWSKI

, J., C.L. L

ISDERO

, S. L

ANONE

, A. S

AMB

, M.C.

C

ARRERAS

, A. B

OVERIS

, M. A

UBIER

, J.J. P

ODEROSO

(1999)

Endogenous peroxynitrite mediates mitochondrial dysfunc-
tion in rat diaphragm during endotoxemia. FASEB J.
13:1637 – 1647.

B

ROWN

, G.C. (1999) Nitric oxide and mitochondrial respira-

tion. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1411:351 – 369.

C

ABRERA

, J., R.J. R

EITER

, D.-X. T

AN

, W. Q

I

, R.M. S

AINZ

,

J.C. M

AYO

, J.J. G

ARCI´A

, S.J. K

IM

, G. E

L

-S

OKKARY

(2000)

Melatonin reduces oxidative neurotoxicity due to quinolinic
acid: In vitro and in vivo findings. Neuropharmacology
39:507 – 514.

C

ARLBERG

, C., I. W

IESENBERG

(1995) The orphan receptor

family RZR/ROR, melatonin and 5-lipoxygenase: An unex-
pected relationship. J. Pineal Res. 18:171 – 178.

C

ONWAY

, S., J.E. D

REW

, E.S. M

OWAT

, P. B

ARRET

, P. D

ELA-

GRANGE

, P.J. M

ORGAN

(2000) Chimeric melatonin mt1 and

melatonin-related receptors. Identification of domains and
residues participating in ligand binding and receptor activa-
tion of the melatonin mt1 receptor. J. Biol. Chem.
275:20602 – 20609.

C

RESPO

, E., M. M

ACIAS

, D. P

OZO

, G. E

SCAMES

, M. M

ARTI´N

,

F. V

IVES

, J.M. G

UERRERO

, D. A

CU

N

0

A

-C

ASTROVIEJO

(1999)

Melatonin inhibits expression of the inducible NO synthase
II in liver and lung and prevents endotoxemia in lipopolysac-
charide-induced multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in
rats. FASEB J. 13:1537 – 1546.

C

ROMPTON

, M. (1999) The mitochondrial permeability transi-

tion pore and its role in cell death. Biochem. J. 341:233 – 249.

D

E

A

TENOR

, M.S., I.R. D

E

R

OMERO

, E. B

RAUCKMANN

, A.

P

ISANO

, A.H. L

EGNAME

(1994) Effects of the pineal gland

and melatonin on the metabolism of oocytes in vitro and on
ovulation in Bufo arenarum. J. Exp. Zool. 268:436 – 441.

DE

G

REY

, A.D.N.J. (1999) The Mitochondrial Free Radical

Theory of Aging. R.G. Landes Company, Austin, TX.

E

SCAMES

, G., D. A

CUN

˜ A

-C

ASTROVIEJO

, F. V

IVES

-M

ONTERO

(1996) Melatonin-dopamine interaction in the striatal projec-
tion area of sensory motor cortex in the rat. NeuroReport
7:597 – 600.

F

RANKEL

, D., H.M. S

CHIPPER

(1999) Cysteamine pretreat-

ment of the astroglial substratum (mitochondrial iron se-
questration) enhances PC12 cell vulnerability to oxidative
injury. Exp. Neurol. 160:376 – 385.

G

ARCI´A

, J.J., R.J. R

EITER

, J. P

IE

, G.G. O

RTIZ

, J. C

ABRERA

,

R.M. S

AINZ

, D. A

CUN

˜ A

-C

ASTROVIEJO

(1999) Role of pino-

line and melatonin in stabilizing hepatic microsomal mem-
branes against oxidative damage. J. Bioenerg. Biomem.
31:609 – 616.

G

ARCI´A

-M

AURIN

˜ O

, S., D. P

OZO

, J.R. C

ALVO

, J.M. G

UER-

RERO

(2000) Correlation between nuclear melatonin receptor

expression and enhanced cytokine production in human
lymphocytic and monocytic cell lines. J. Pineal Res. 29:129 –
137.

G

ILAD

, E., S. C

UZZOCREA

, B. Z

INGARELLI

, A.L. S

ALZMAN

,

C. S

ZABO

(1997) Melatonin is a scavenger of peroxynitrite.

Life Sci. 60:PL169 – PL174.

G

UERRERO

, J.M., R.J. R

EITER

, G.G. O

RTIZ

, M.I. P

ABLOS

, E.

S

EWERYNEK

, J.I. C

HUANG

(1997) Melatonin prevents in-

creases in neural nitric oxide and cyclic GMP production
after transient brain ischemia and reperfusion in the Mongo-
lian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus). J. Pineal Res. 23:24 – 31.

H

ARMAN

, D. (1956) Aging: A theory based on free radical and

radiation chemistry. J. Gerontol. 11:98 – 300.

K

ARBOWNIK

, M.A., R.J. R

EITER

(2000) Antioxidative effects

of melatonin in protection against cellular damage caused by
ionizing radiation. Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 225:9 – 22.

K

HALDY

, H., G. E

SCAMES

, J. L

EO

´ N

, F. V

IVES

, J.D. L

UNA

, D.

A

CUN

˜ A

-C

ASTROVIEJO

(2000) Comparative effects of mela-

tonin,

L

-deprenyl, Trolox and ascorbate in the suppression

of hydroxyl radical formation during dopamine autoxidation
in vitro. J. Pineal Res. 29:100 – 107.

L

APIN

, I.P., S.M. M

IRZAEV

, I.V. R

YZOV

, G.F. O

XENKRUG

(1998) Anticonvulsant activity of melatonin against seizures
induced by quinolinate, kainate, glutamate, NMDA, and
pentylenetetrazole in mice. J. Pineal Res. 24:215 – 218.

L

ENAZ

, G. (1998) Role of mitochondria in oxidative stress and

aging. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1366:53 – 67.

L

EO

´ N

, J., F. V

IVES

, E. C

RESPO

, E. C

AMACHO

, A. E

SPINOSA

,

M.A. G

ALLO

, G. E

SCAMES

, D. A

CU

N

0

A

-C

ASTROVIEJO

(1998)

Modification of nitric oxide synthase activity and neuronal
response in rat striatum by melatonin and kynurenine
derivatives. J. Neuroendocrinol. 10:297 – 302.

72

Melatonin, mitochondria, and ATP

L

EO

´ N

, J., M. M

ACIAS

, G. E

SCAMES

, E. C

AMACHO

, H.

K

HALDY

, M. M

ACIAS

, A. E

SPINOSA

, M.A. G

ALLO

, D.

A

CUN

˜ A

-C

ASTROVIEJO

(2000) Structure-related inhibition of

calmodulin-dependent nNOS activity by melatonin and syn-
thetic kynurenines. Mol. Pharmacol. 58:966 – 975.

L

ERNER

, A.B., J.D. C

ASE

, Y. T

AKAHASI

, T.H. L

EE

, W. M

ORI

(1958) Isolation of melatonin, the pineal gland factor that
lightens melanocytes. J. Am. Chem. Soc. LXXX:2587.

L

IZARD

, G., C. M

IGUET

, G. B

ESSEDE

, S. M

ONIER

, S.

G

UELDRY

, D. N

EEL

, P. G

AMBERT

(2000) Impairment with

various antioxidants of the loss of mitochondrial transmem-
brane potential and of the cytosolic release of cytochrome c
occurring during 7-ketocholesterol-induced apoptosis. Free
Rad. Biol. Med. 28:743 – 753.

L

OEFFLER

, M., G. K

ROEMER

(2000) The mitochondrion in

cell death control: Certainties and incognita. Expt. Cell Res.
256:19 – 26.

M

ANEV

, H., T. U

Z

, H. T

OLGA

, A. K

HARLAMOV

, J.Y. J

OO

(1996) Increased brain damage after stroke or excitotoxic
seizures in melatonin-deficient rats. FASEB J. 10:1546 – 1551.

M

ARTI´N

, M., M. M

ACIAS

, G. E

SCAMES

, J. L

EO

´ N

, D. A

CU

N

0

A

-

C

ASTROVIEJO

(2000a) Melatonin but not vitamins C and E

maintains glutathione homeostasis in t-butyl hydroperoxide-
induced mitochondrial oxidative stress. FASEB J. 14:1677 –
1679.

M

ARTI´N

, M., M. M

ACIAS

, G. E

SCAMES

, R.J. R

EITER

, M.T.

A

GAPITO

, G.G. O

RTIZ

, D. A

CUN

˜ A

-C

ASTROVIEJO

(2000b)

Melatonin-induced increased activity of the respiratory chain
complexes I and IV can prevent mitochondrial damage in-
duced by ruthenium red in vivo. J. Pineal Res. 28:242 – 248.

M

ARTI´N,

M

.,

M

.

M

ACIAS,

J

.

L

EO

´ N,

G

.

E

SCAMES,

H

.

K

HALDY,

D

.

A

CUN

˜ A-

C

ASTROVIEJO

(2000c) Melatonin promotes mito-

chondrial oxidative phosphorylation and ATP synthesis in-
teracting with complex I and IV of the electron transport
chain. Biochim. Biophys. Acta, in press

M

ELCHIORRI

, D., R.J. R

EITER

, E. S

EWERYNEK

, L.D. C

HEN

,

G. N

ISTICO

(1995) Melatonin reduces kainate-induced lipid

peroxidation in homogenates of different brain regions.
FASEB J. 9:1205 – 1210.

M

ELCHIORRI

, D., G.G. O

RTIZ

, R.J. R

EITER

, E. S

EWERYNEK

,

W.M.U. D

ANIELS

, M.I. P

ABLOS

, G. N

ISTICO

(1998) Mela-

tonin reduces paraquat-induced genotoxicity in mice. Toxi-
col. Lett. 95:103 – 108.

M

ENE

´ NDEZ

-P

ELA

´ EZ

, A., B. P

OEGGELER

, R.J. R

EITER

, L.

B

ARLOW

-W

ALDEN

, M.I. P

ABLOS

, D.X. T

AN

(1993) Nuclear

localization of melatonin in different mammalian tissues.
Immunocytochemical and radioimmunoassay evidence. J.
Cell. Biochem. 53:373 – 382.

M

ILCZAREK

, R., J. K

LIMEK

, L. Z

ELEWSKI

(2000) Melatonin

inhibits NADPH-dependent lipid peroxidation in human
placental mitochondria. Horm. Metab. Res. 32:84 – 85.

M

IQUEL

, J., A.C. E

CONOMOS

, J. F

LEMING

, J.E. J

OHNSON

J

R

.

(1980) Mitochondrial role in cell aging. Exp. Gerontol.
15:579 – 591.

M

OLINA

-C

ARBALLO

, A., A. M

U

N

0

OZ

-H

OYOS

, R. J. R

EITER

,

M. S

ANCHEZ

-F

ORTE

, F. M

ORENO

-M

ADRID

, M. R

UFO

-

C

AMPOS

, J.A. M

OLINA

-F

ONT

, D. A

CU

N

0

A

-C

ASTROVIEJO

(1997) Utility of high doses of melatonin as adjunctive anti-
convulsant therapy in a child with severe myoclonic epilepsy:
Two years’ experience. J. Pineal Res. 23:97 – 105.

M

URPHY

, M.P. (1989) Slip and leak in mitochondrial oxida-

tive phosphorylation. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 977:123 – 141.

N

ATHAN

, A.T., M. S

INGER

(1999) The oxygen trail: Tissue

oxygenation. Br. Med. Bull. 55:96 – 108.

N

ICHOLLS

, D.G., S.L. B

UDD

(2000) Mitochondria and neu-

ronal survival. Physiol. Rev. 80:315 – 360.

P

APPOLLA

, M.A., Y.-J. C

HYAN

, B. P

OEGGELER

, B. F

RAN-

GIONE

, G. W

ILSON

, J. G

HISO

, R.J. R

EITER

(2000) An assess-

ment of the antioxidant and antiamyloidogenic properties of
melatonin: Implications for Alzheimer’s disease. J. Neural
Transm. 107:203 – 231.

P

OON

, A.M., S.F. P

ANG

(1992) 2[

125

I]iodomelatonin binding

sites in spleens of guinea pigs. Life Sci. 50:1719 – 1726.

R

EITER

, R.J. (1980) The pineal and its hormones in the

control of reproduction in mammals. Endocrine Rev. 1:109 –
131.

R

EITER

, R.J. (1998) Oxidative damage in the central nervous

system: Protection by melatonin. Prog. Neurobiol. 56:359 –
384.

R

EITER

, R.J. (1999) Experimental observations related to the

utility of melatonin in attenuating age-related diseases. Adv.
Gerontol. 3:121 – 132.

R

EITER

, R.J. (2000) Melatonin: Lowering the high price of

free radicals. News Physiol. Sci. 15:246 – 250.

R

EITER

, R.J., J.M. G

UERRERO

, G. E

SCAMES

, M.A. P

APOLLA

,

D. A

CU

N

0

A

-C

ASTROVIEJO

(1997a) Prophylactic actions of

melatonin in oxidative neurotoxicity. Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci.
825:70 – 78.

R

EITER

, R.J., L. T

ANG

, J.J. G

ARCI´A

, A. M

U

N

0

OZ

-H

OYOS

(1997b) Pharmacological actions of melatonin in oxygen
radical pathophysiology. Life Sci. 60:2255 – 2271.

R

EITER

, R.J., J.J. G

ARCI´A

, J. P

IE

(1998) Oxidative toxicity in

models of neurodegeneration: Responses to melatonin. Rest.
Neurol. Neurosci. 12:135 – 142.

R

EITER

, R.J., D.-X. T

AN

., S.J. K

IM

, L.C. M

ANCHESTER

, W.

Q

I

, J.J. G

ARCI´A

, J.C. C

ABRERA

, G. E

L

-S

OKKARY

, V.

R

EUVIER

-G

ARAY

(1999) Augmentation of indices of oxida-

tive damage in life-long melatonin-deficient rats. Mech. Ag-
ing Develop. 110:157 – 173.

R

EITER

, R.J., D.-X. T

AN

, W. Q

I

, L.C. M

ANCHESTER

, M.

K

ARBOWNIK

, J.R. C

ALVO

(2000) Pharmacology and physiol-

ogy of melatonin in the reduction of oxidative stress in vivo.
Biol. Signals Recept. 9:160 – 171.

R

OMERO

, M.P., A. G

ARCI´A

-P

ERGA

N

0

EDA

, J.M. G

UERRERO

,

C. O

SUNA

(1998) Membrane-bound calmodulin in Xenopus

lae

6is oocytes as a novel binding site for melatonin. FASEB

J. 12:1401 – 1408.

S

ASTRE

, J., F.V. P

ALLARDO

, J. G

ARCI´A

D

E

L

A

A

SUNCION

, J.

V

I

N

0

A

(2000) Mitochondria, oxidative stress and aging. Free

Rad. Res. 32:189 – 198.

S

CHAPIRA

, A.H.V. (1999) Mitochondrial involvement in

Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, hereditary spastic
paraplegia and Friedreich’s ataxia. Biochim. Biophys. Acta
1410:159 – 170.

S

EWERYNEK

, E., D. M

ELCHIORRI

, L. C

HEN

, R.J. R

EITER

(1995) Melatonin reduces both basal and bacterial lipo-
polysaccharide-induced lipid peroxidation in vitro. Free
Rad. Biol. Med. 19:903 – 909.

S

KINNER

, D.C., B. M

ALPAUX

(1999) High melatonin concen-

trations in third ventricular cerebrospinal fluid are not due to
Galen vein blood recirculation through the choroid plexus.
Endocrinology 140:4399 – 4405.

S

KULACHEV

, V.P. (1999) Mitochondrial physiology and

pathology: Concepts or programmed death of organelles,
cells and organisms. Mol. Aspects Med. 20:139 – 184.

T

AN

, D.-X., L.C. M

ANCHESTER

, R.J. R

EITER

, W. Q

I

, S.J.

K

IM

,

G.H.

E

L

-S

OKKARY

(1998)

Melatonin

protects

hippocampal neurons in vivo against kainic acid-induced
damage in mice. J. Neurosci. Res. 54:382 – 389.

T

AN

, D.-X., L.C. M

ANCHESTER

, R.J. R

EITER

, W. Q

I

, M.A.

H

ANES

, N.J. F

ARLEY

(1999) High physiological levels of

melatonin in the bile of mammals. Life Sci. 65:2523 – 2529.

73

Acun˜a-Castroviejo et al.

T

AN

, D.-X., L.C. M

ANCHESTER

, R.J. R

EITER

, W. Q

I

, M.A.

K

ARBOWNIK

, J.R. C

ALVO

(2000a) Significance of melatonin

in antioxidative defense system: Reactions and products.
Biol. Signals Recept. 9:137 – 159.

T

AN

, D.-X., L.C. M

ANCHESTER

, R.J. R

EITER

, B.F. P

LUM-

MER

, J. L

IMSON

, S.T. W

EINTRAUB

, W. Q

I

(2000b) Mela-

tonin directly scavenges hydrogen peroxide: A potentially
new metabolic pathway of melatonin biotransformation.
Free Rad. Biol. Med. 29:1177 – 1185.

U

RATA

, Y., S. H

ONMA

, S. G

OTO

, S. T

ODORIKI

, T. U

EDA

, S.

C

HO

, K. H

ONMA

, T. K

ONDO

(1999) Melatonin induces

-glutamylcysteine synthase mediated by activator protein-1
in human vascular endothelial cells. Free Rad. Biol. Med.
27:838 – 847.

Y

AMAMOTO

, H.A., H.W. T

ANG

(1996) Preventive effects of

melatonin against cyanide-induced seizures and lipid peroxi-
dation in mice. Neurosci. Lett. 207:89 – 92.

74