Introduction

The rib hump, rather than the spinal deformity, is the
major cosmetic deformity in scoliosis and success in
treating the lateral curve is not always matched by
reduction in the rib deformity [

6

]. Numerous procedures

have been described to address the rib deformity.
Schollner’s costoplasty, anterior thoracoplasties, and
posterior costectomies are some of the more frequently
used techniques [

2

,

4

]. Most studies dealing with these

procedures have analyzed the cosmetic correction ob-
tained as well as the complications associated with it but
none have objectively analyzed the regeneration pattern

of these excised ribs after costectomies and its implica-
tions on the functional outcome in detail [

1

,

4

,

5

].

Although bone formation and regeneration after

corticotomy of long bones, has been studied extensively
and classification systems established [

3

], studies of rib

regeneration following costectomy for idiopathic scoli-
osis have been scarce. (The authors did a Pubmed and
Medline search using key words costectomy, costoplas-
ty, thoracoplasty and rib regeneration). Due to the high
incidence of donor site morbidity, and the limited
availability of bone in small children, many alternate
materials like allograft, synthetic bone graft substitutes
and mixtures of artificial and autologous bone grafts etc.

Satheesh J. Philip
Renjit J. Kumar
K. V. Menon

Morphological study of rib regeneration
following costectomy in adolescent idiopathic
scoliosis

Received: 19 October 2004
Revised: 26 March 2005
Accepted: 5 April 2005
Published online: 27 July 2005
Ó Springer-Verlag 2005

Abstract This is a prospective
observational study comparing cases
with retrospective controls. The aim
of the study is to compare rib
regeneration with a scaffold placed
intra-periosteally against no scaf-
fold, after costectomy in adolescent
idiopathic scoliosis. A prospective
study was conducted at Amrita
Institute of Medical Sciences on 16
consecutive patients (51 ribs) with
adolescent idiopathic scoliosis who
underwent costectomy and applica-
tion of gel foam in the rib bed as a
scaffold. These patients were com-
pared with a retrospective group of
15 patients (33 ribs) who did not
have the scaffold. All prospective
and retrospective patients were
followed up for a minimum period
of 6 months and were analyzed

radiographically for rib regeneration
and morphology. A classification
system was devised to include all
possible morphologies of regenerate.
The resulting data, when analyzed
showed that majority of ribs re-grew
to normal morphology in 3–
6 months in the trial group. In
comparison the regeneration in the
retrospective controls was slower
and poorer in quality. Ribs treated
by placement of gel foam scaffold in
the bed regenerate to a near normal
radiological profile within 6 months
of costectomy compared to a slower
regeneration in those without gel
foam scaffold.

Keywords Adolescent idiopathic
scoliosis Æ Costectomy Æ
Rib regeneration

Eur Spine J (2005) 14: 772–776
DOI 10.1007/s00586-005-0949-8

O R I G I N A L A R T I C L E

S. J. Philip (

&) Æ R. J. Kumar

K. V. Menon
Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences,
Amrita lane, Elamakkara,
Cochin 26, Kerala 682026, India
E-mail: ortho@aimshospital.org
Tel.: +914842802056
Fax: +914842802020

have been studied for fusions in spinal deformity. There
is unanimous agreement that autologous bone graft is
the gold standard. As rib is an excellent source of
autologous cancellous graft, costectomy can be used as a
procedure for correction of the rib hump in scoliosis as
well as a source of autologous cancellous graft. Cos-
tectomy and use of rib as graft for fusion is routine in
our institution for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. This
study was undertaken to classify and quantify rib
regeneration following costectomy for adolescent idio-
pathic scoliosis. It was presumed that bone growth is
faster when there is a scaffold for the cells to grow over
and the quality of the regenerate is better than when they
grow in an empty periosteal tube.

Material and methods

The patients were divided into 2 groups. The trial group
consisted of 16 consecutive patients (51 ribs) of adoles-
cent idiopathic scoliosis, with an average age of 14 yrs
(11–16 yrs). All the patients underwent costectomy and
intra-periosteal gel foam application in the rib bed. They
were followed up for 1 yr with radiographs taken at
3 monthly intervals. The control group consisted of pa-
tients who had had costectomy as a part of their scoliosis
correction surgery but did not have gel foam implanted
into the rib bed. Fifteen consecutive patients (33 ribs), in
the age range of 10–16 yrs (average14.5 yrs) fell into this
group. They were analyzed retrospectively by serial
radiographs taken at similar intervals for a minimum of
1 year. The X-rays of both groups were assessed to
determine the quantity and quality of the regenerate.

Operative technique

All patients undergoing posterior instrumentation and
fusion for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis at our center
routinely undergo costectomies. The surgical technique
was identical in both trial and control groups. Excision
of 2–3 inches each of 2–6 ribs from the convex side of
the apical region of the curve is adequate in most cases.
The operative technique in both groups consisted of
subperiosteal dissection of the ribs. Through the original
midline incision, the plane between Lattissimus Dorsi
and the Erector Spinae is developed. The ribs maximally
contributing to the hump are exposed from the tip of the
transverse process to the posterior axillary line. About
4–6 ribs are then excised subperiosteally. Any accidental
pleural tear is repaired immediately in a watertight
manner. After excision and meticulous hemostasis the
rib bed was reconstructed in the case of the trial group
by placing absorbable gelatin sponge gel foam (Phar-
macia-Upjohn) or Spongostan (Johnson& Johnson) of
the corresponding size as the excised rib. The periosteum

was meticulously closed in both groups. The muscle
layer was then closed without a drain.

AP radiographs of the spine were taken according to

the standard protocol (standing films at 1 m) immedi-
ately post op, at 6 weeks, and thereafter at 3 monthly
intervals for 1 year. All ribs in both groups were analyzed
for the quantity and quality of regeneration. The regen-
erate was classified according to our rib regenerate clas-
sification protocol. The radiological evaluation was done
by an independent observer (Orthopaedic Surgeon), and
the two senior authors separately, and their observations
tabulated. (The intra and inter observer variability of the
classification system is currently being studied).

Rib regenerate classification

The rib regenerate classification was formulated after
reviewing 99 patients with 360 rib resections performed
at this institute between 2001 and 2004. The following
grades of regenerate are described.

1. No regenerate
2. Diffuse opacity; no corticalization
3. Corticalized discrete islands of regenerate
4. Corticalized, but irregular, oligotrophic regenerate,

not in continuity

5. Corticalized, but irregular, oligotrophic regenerate, in

continuity

6. Corticalized, smooth, oligotrophic regenerate, in

continuity

7. Normal or hypertrophic regenerate [Fig.

1

7

].

Results and analysis

Control group (15 patients, 33 ribs)

In the control group (without gel foam scaffold) 33 rib
resections in 15 patients were analyzed for rib regenera-
tion morphology. At 3 months most of the control group
ribs (27/33) fell between grades 2–3 in the regenerate
classification. (Table

1

). At 6 months there was marginal

improvement with majority of the ribs falling in between
grades 3 and 5 (22/27). By 1 yr almost all ribs (26/27) on
which data was available regenerated to more than grade
4. At 6 months and 1 y 2 patients with a total of 6 rib
resections were not available for follow up. There was no
significant improvement in the regenerate beyond 1 yr in
21 ribs that were followed up for a period of 2 yrs.

Trial group (16 patients, 51 ribs)

In the trial group (with gel foam scaffold) 16 patients
with 51 rib resections were analyzed for regeneration

773

morphology and time. At 3 months 33/51 ribs regener-
ated to grade 5 or more. On follow up at 6 months 42
out of 51(82%) had achieved grade 6 or 7 of regenera-
tion and no rib followed up fell below grade 4 (Table

2

).

Although only 13 ribs were followed up at 1 yr, this

drop out was not significant, as 42/51 ribs had already
achieved maximum regeneration grades at 6 months.

It was observed that in the trial cases, (in which gel

foam was used as a scaffold) the ribs regenerated faster
and to near normal morphology. Almost all ribs in the

Fig. 1 GRADE 1: No regener-
ate

Fig. 2 GRADE 2: Diffuse
opacity; no corticalization

Fig. 3 GRADE 3: Corticalized
discrete islands of regenerate

Fig. 4 GRADE 4: Corticalized,
but irregular, oligotrophic
regenerate, not in continuity

Fig. 5 GRADE 5: Corticalized,
but irregular, oligotrophic
regenerate, in continuity

774

trial group reached grade 4 or above at 6 months
whereas in the control group the regenerate was poor
with most regeneration falling below grade 4 at the same
period. The data was analyzed using the Fischer exact
test and was found to be statistically significant with P
values of >0.0001 at 3 months, >0.0001 at 6 months
and >0.0005 at 1 y.

Discussion

There is very little information available in medical
literature on rib regeneration. H.H. Steele studied 1840

ribs in 392 patients and found that the ribs regener-
ated in an average time of 3 months. Barret, D.S.
et al. in a study of 55 patients (no: of ribs not men-
tioned) has quoted the average time for regeneration
as 3.6 months after costectomy. (Steele did not use X-
rays for his analysis of rib regeneration. In Barrett’s
study the author has not mentioned what technique of
analysis was used.) The discrepancy in the regenera-
tion times may be due to difference in methodology of
evaluation of results. The method of confirmation of
regeneration in the series of Steele. was by palpation.
The surgical technique in his series and the present
study were different. Steele used a separate incision for
rib dissection and excision but placed a scaffold in the
rib bed before closure. Barret et al. did not use a
scaffold in the rib bed after excision but the surgical
technique was similar to the present study. He radio-
logically evaluated the regenerate without a classifica-
tion. In the present study 16 patients (51 ribs), with
application of gel foam as a scaffold in the rib bed
were evaluated against a retrospective control group of
15 patients (33 ribs) without placement of gel foam in
the rib bed. The regeneration time in the gel foam
group was found to be comparable to the above
studies but the consolidation to near normal radio-
logical profile based on the new classification, took an
average of 6 months. This study has objectively
documented faster and better regeneration of ribs by
using a scaffold of gel foam in the rib bed as opposed
to the controls without gel foam placement. The
study also demonstrated normal radiological consoli-
dation of regenerate at 6 months compared to sub-
jective assessment of regeneration in 3 and 3.6 months
by

Steele

and

Barret

et

al.

respectively.

The

retrospective control group in the present series had
slower rate of regeneration compared to the above-

Fig. 6 GRADE 6: Corticalized,
smooth, oligotrophic regener-
ate, in continuity

Table 1 Control group (15 patients, 33 ribs) No: of ribs

Classification

3 months

6 months

1 yr

2 yrs

1

1

2

22

1

3

5

12

1

1

4

2

4

14

5

5

3

6

2

4

6

0

4

6

5

7

0

0

4

6

Total

33

27

27

21

Table 2 Trial group (16 patients, 51 ribs) No: of ribs

Classification

3 months

6 months

1 yr

1

3

2

4

3

5

4

6

1

5

17

8

6

8

11

5

7

8

31

8

Total

51

51

13

Fig. 7 GRADE 7: Normal or
hypertrophic regenerate

775

mentioned studies. The regeneration time averaged
6 months.

This study does not, however, look into the cosmetic

and functional implications of the regenerate. Does a
good radiological regenerate necessarily mean a good
cosmetic outcome? Does the good regenerate correlate
clinically with good pulmonary function? These are is-
sues not addressed by this paper. Prospective and ret-
rospective studies are currently ongoing at our centre to
ascertain such a correlation. The applicability of infor-
mation regarding regeneration of ribs to other areas of
bony regeneration can be pursued through further
studies (though rib being a membranous bone its
regeneration characteristics may differ substantially
from endochondral bone). It would also be interesting to

postulate the effect of scaffolding in cortical bone de-
fects.

Conclusions

– Ribs regenerate to a near normal radiological profile

within 6 months of costectomy when gel foam scaffold
is placed in the rib bed.

– Rib regeneration in patients without gel foam scaffold

is slower and poorer in quality.

– It seems that the classification system allows an

objective radiological assessment of the quality and
quantity of rib regeneration.

References

1. Barret DS, MacLean JGB, Bettany J,

Ransford AO, Edgar MAJ (1993) Co-
stoplasty in adolescent idiopathic scolio-
sis. Objective results in 55 patients.
J Bone Joint Surg Br 75:881–885

2. Broome G, Simpson AHRW, Catalan J,

Jefferson RJ, Houghton GR (1990) The
modified Schollner costoplasty. J Bone
Joint Surg Br 72:894–900

3. Cattaneo R, Catagni MA, Villa A,

Maiocchi AB, Aronson J, Paley D,
Bendetti GB (1991) In: Maiocchi AB,
Aronson J (eds) Operative Principles of
Ilizarov, 1st edn. Williams and Wilkins,
Italy, pp 52–55

4. Owen R, Turner A, Bamforth JSG,

Taylor J, Jones RS (1986) Costectomy as
the first stage of surgery for scoliosis.
J Bone Joint Surg Br 68:91–95

5. Steele HH (1983) Rib resection and spine

fusion in correction of convex deformity
in scoliosis. J Bone Joint Surg Am
65:920–925

6. Weatherly CR, Draycott V, O’Brien JF,

Benson DR, Gopalakrishnan KC, Evans
JH, O’Brien JP (1987) The rib deformity
in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, a pro-
spective study to evaluate changes after
Harrington distraction and posterior fu-
sion. J Bone Joint Surg Br 69:179–182

776