Effect of hypnosis on induction of local anaesthesia, pain perception, control of
haemorrhage and anxiety during extraction of third molars: A case

econtrol study

Seyyed Kazem Abdeshahi

a

Maryam Alsadat Hashemipour

b

,

*

, Vahid Mesgarzadeh

c

,

Akbar Shahidi Payam

c

Alireza Halaj Monfared

c

a

Kerman Oral and Dental l Diseases Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran

b

Kerman Oral and Dental Diseases Research Center, Department of Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran

c

Kerman Oral and Dental Diseases Research Center, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran

a r t i c l e i n f o

Article history:
Paper received 27 March 2012
Accepted 18 October 2012

Keywords:
Hypnosis
Anaesthesia
Haemorrhage
Anxiety
Pain
Molar
Tooth extraction

a b s t r a c t

Introduction: Systemic conditions are considered limiting factors for surgical procedures under local anaes-
thesia in the oral cavity. All the pharmacological methods to control pain in patients have some disadvantages,
such as side effects and extra costs for rehabilitation. Therefore, in such cases alternative treatment modalities
are considered, such as hypnosis in dentistry. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of
hypnosis on haemorrhage, pain and anxiety during the extraction of third molars.
Materials and methods: In this case

econtrol study, 24 female and male volunteers were included. The

subjects had been referred to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kerman University of
Medical Sciences, for extraction of third molars. Demographic data for all the subjects were recorded. Patients
with chronic medical conditions were excluded. The patients were used as their own controls, with the third
molars on one side being removed under hypnosis and on the opposite side under local anaesthetic.

Hypnosis was induced by one of the two methods, either

fixing the gaze on one point or Chiasson’s

technique; both these methods are appropriate for patients in the dental chair. The Spielberger State-Trait
Anxiety Inventory was used to determine patient anxiety levels before hypnosis and anaesthesia. Pain was
scored using VAS (visual analogue scale). After surgery the patient was asked to bite on a sterile gauze pad
over the surgical site for 30 min when haemorrhage from the area was evaluated. If there was no hae-
morrhage the patient was discharged. If haemorrhage persisted, the gauze pad was left in place for another
30 min and the area was re-evaluated. Any active oozing from the area after 30 min was considered hae-
morrhage. Haemorrhage, anxiety and pain were compared between the two groups. Data was analyzed
using the t-test, McNemar

’s test and Wilcoxon’s signed rank test using SPSS 18 statistical software.

Results: Twenty-four patients were evaluated; there were 14 males (58.3%) and 10 females (41.7%). The
mean age of the subjects was 24.1

 2.7 years (age range ¼ 18e30 years). A total of 48 third molars were

extracted. In each patient, one-third molar was extracted under hypnosis and the other under local
anaesthesia. All the patients were in the ASA 1 category (normal) with no signi

ficant medical history.

Of the subjects who underwent hypnosis, only two subjects (8.3%) reported pain after induction of

hypnosis. In the local anaesthetic group, 8 subjects (33.3%) reported pain. There was a signi

ficant

difference between the two groups. The results of the study showed that patients in the hypnosis group
had less pain during the

first few hours post-operatively. Anxiety scores in the two groups were very

close to each other and no statistically signi

ficant differences were observed in general and when each

person was compared with himself or herself. Pain intensity in the two groups at 5- and 12-h post-
operatively exhibited signi

ficant differences. In the hypnosis group, 10 patients (41.7%) took analgesic

medication; in the local anaesthesia group, 22 patients (91.7%) took the analgesic medication
(P

¼ 0.0001). In other words, patients reported less pain when they were under hypnosis.

Conclusion: The results of the study showed that hypnosis can effectively reduce anxiety, haemorrhage and
pain. More studies are necessary to collect data on the effect of hypnosis on oral and maxillofacial surgeries.

Ó 2012 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

reserved.

* Corresponding author. Tel.: þ98 9132996183, þ98 3412118074; fax: þ98

3412118073.

E-mail addresses:

m_s_hashemipour@yahoo.com

,

m_hashemipoor@kmu.ac.ir

(M.A. Hashemipour).

Contents lists available at

SciVerse ScienceDirect

Journal of Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery

j o u r n a l h o m e p a g e : w w w . j c m f s . c o m

1010-5182/$

e see front matter Ó 2012 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcms.2012.10.009

Journal of Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery 41 (2013) 310

e315

1. Introduction

Hypnosis has a long history in the treatment of diseases.

Cuneiform tablets dating from 4000 BC show that Sumerians knew
about hypnosis. Persian Moghans or Iranian religious leaders before
Islam used hypnosis in the treatment of diseases. The

first academic

treatment centre to of

ficially use hypnosis to treat patients was the

Nancy Medical Faculty. The dean of this French medical institution
was Professor Hippolyte Bernheim (1840

e1919), the prominent

neurologist, who instituted the application of hypnosis in the
various clinics of Nancy Medical Faculty after becoming acquainted
with hypnosis and realizing its ef

ficacy in the treatment of some

medical conditions. In 1953 a committee was established by the
British Medical Association, which consisted of several psycholo-
gists and psychiatrists, to carry out serious and detailed investi-
gations into hypnosis and its therapeutic applications. The
investigations of the committee showed that hypnosis can be used
as a thoroughly scienti

fic technique, not only in the treatment of

psychosomatic and psychoneurotic conditions, but also in dental
procedures, painless parturition, relief of pain and in surgery (

Ross,

1981

). At present, hypnosis has a large number of applications in

medicine, including alleviation of acute pain, decrease in labour
pain, treatment of trigeminal neuralgia, paediatric medicine,
asthma, various surgical procedures, burns, migraine and tension
headaches, neck and back pain, a wide range of chronic pain
syndromes, chronic pain of cancer, arthritis and diabetic neurop-
athy (

Rosen and Harold, 1954

;

Andrew and Welbury, 1996

).

Hypnosis can negate the need for local anaesthetic agents; in other
words, it results in a feeling of anaesthesia in an area (

Joseph, 1998

).

Hypnodontics is a branch of dentistry, in which use of hypnosis

for dental procedures is discussed (

Joseph, 1998

). Some people talk

about dental visits in a manner as if they were the most painful
experiences on earth.

The majority of dental patients referred to a dental of

fice for the

first time or those who have experienced great pain during
previous dental visits and almost all the children and adolescents,
visit dental of

fices with a degree of panic and great anxiety. If

patients

’ fears can be quelled, therapeutic procedures will be

carried out in a more acceptable atmosphere and the pain
threshold of these patients will increase to a higher level (

Islam

et al., 2012

;

Habal, 2009

). If patients undergo hypnosis, it will be

possible to make some suggestions and under such conditions they
will have no fear of dental visits. The patients will then be able to
tolerate dental procedures and will not experience any anxiety or
fear in the dental chair. Fortunately, such suggestions are very
effective even under light hypnosis. The majority of patients
referred to dental of

fices can be easily put under this level of

hypnosis (

Joseph, 1998

). Sometimes it is not possible or advisable to

use local anaesthetic agents; in such cases hypnosis can be highly
successful.

Local anaesthesia may fail due to technical errors, such as the

absence of teeth used as guides during injection.

The injection of local anaesthetic may be accompanied by

complications, such as lingual nerve damage (

Erdogmus et al.,

2008

or pseudoaneurysm of the facial artery (

Choi et al., 2012

).

There are some studies on the use of hypnosis for some proce-

dures, including reducing patients

’ anxieties and fears, prevention

of excessive haemorrhage during tooth extraction in patients with
haemophilia or high blood pressure, preparation of patients for
induction of anaesthesia, decreasing or inhibiting salivary

flow,

taking impressions without nausea and vomiting for prosthetic and
orthodontic procedures, treatment of some adverse oral habits
such as bruxism, thumb sucking and nail biting, disorders of the
temporomandibular

joint,

promotion

of

oral

hygiene

and

increasing patient tolerance during long periods of mouth opening

(

Gerschman, 1989

;

Chaves, 1997a

,

1997b

;

Bassi et al., 2004

;

Cuellar,

2005

;

Hermes et al., 2005

).

The

first documented case of the use of hypnosis in dentistry to

induce anaesthesia and ease patient fear was reported by Jean-
Victor Oudet who, in 1829, used hypno-anaesthesia to facilitate
a dental extraction. In 1847 two more pioneering French doctors
(Ribaud and Kiaro) used hypnosis for anaesthesia to be able to
remove a tumour of the jaw (

Chaves, 1997a

,

b

).

One of the reasons for not attending dental of

fices is patient

anxiety and fear of dental procedures, including the injection of
local anaesthetic agents. In some cases it is dif

ficult or even

impossible to achieve proper anaesthesia and patients may feel
pain even with multiple and consecutive injections of local
anaesthetic agents, disrupting the treatment procedure. In some
cases the use of local anaesthetic agents is contraindicated. In order
to address these issues this study aimed to evaluate the success rate
of hypnosis in inducing local anaesthesia, decreasing haemorrhage,
pain perception and reducing anxiety during surgical extraction of
the third molars.

2. Materials and methods

This case

econtrol study was approved by the ethics committee

of the Kerman University of Medical Sciences (No.k.90.140). The
study was carried out in the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery,
Faculty of Dentistry, Kerman University of Medical Sciences. A
purpose-oriented sampling procedure was used and only patients
who needed bilateral surgical extraction of mandibular or maxillary
third molars were included in the study. The subjects were all over
18 years of age from both sexes. Demographic data including age,
sex and educational level were recorded. A panoramic radiographic
view was requested if the patient did not have one. Only patients in
Class AI category based on Pell and Gregory classi

fication were

included in the study (

Fig. 1

). The last inclusion criterion was no

difference in the vertical dimension of eruption and buccal or
lingual tilt of the teeth. None the teeth had severe caries.

The subjects were in ASA 1 from a systemic point of view (ASA 1:

normal individuals). None of the patients were diagnosed with
emotional and mental problems by a psychiatrist. None of the
patients used addictive or euphoric drugs or took additional
medication. The patients had no systemic problems, such as coag-
ulation problems, including haemophilia and platelet disorders.
Patients who could not concentrate or were unable to accept
hypnosis were excluded from the study and patients who provided
positive responses to evaluations were included (

Flammer and

Bongartz, 2003

;

Hermes et al., 2005

;

Eitner et al., 2006

). After the

patients quali

fied for the study their questions in relation to

hypnosis and the study procedures were recorded. Adequate
explanations were provided in relation to advantages and possible
disadvantages of hypnosis and following explanation of the study
procedures informed written consent was obtained.

The Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was used to

determine patient anxiety levels before hypnosis and anaesthesia.
The questionnaire consists of 20 questions on different aspects of
anxiety with responses of not at all (score 1), to some extent/a little
(score 2), moderate (score 3) and rather high (score 4). The scores
range from 20 (no anxiety) to 80 (the highest anxiety level). As the
score increases, the anxiety level increases at that particular
moment (

Kvaal et al., 2005

).

Hypnosis was induced by one of two methods;

fixing the gaze

on one point or Chiasson

’s technique; both these methods are

appropriate for patients on the dental chair. In the Chiasson

’s

technique the patient is asked to place her/his hand in front of face,
palm facing away, with the

fingers held together about 1 foot from

the face. In this position, a natural strain takes place on the

fingers

S.K. Abdeshahi et al. / Journal of Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery 41 (2013) 310

e315

311

to begin to spread and, when accompanied by a suggestion to this
effect linking the spreading of the

fingers to entering the hypnotic

state, it can be quite enticing to the patient to

“let go and enter the

hypnotic state

” (

Daniels, 1977

). Amongst all of the existing hypnosis

method, a traditional one is

fixing the gaze on one point or fixation

induction. This draws subject

’s attention to the fixation object such

as a pendulum or a dot on the wall. As concentration focuses on the
fixation object, the subject’s attention is drawn away from external
sights and sounds (

Page and Handley, 1991

).

Hypnosis was deepened by presenting proper suggestions and

induction of local anaesthesia in the patient

’s hand. The patient was

asked a question about the anaesthesia of the location. A hypno-
tized patient can reply by moving a

finger. If anaesthesia was in

effect the time was recorded. Then anaesthesia was transferred to
the tooth area involved. To this end the

finger of the anesthetized

hand was moved to touch the tooth and the adjacent soft tissues,
which resulted in anaesthesia in that location. Suggestions
continued to deepen the anaesthesia in the area. Then the thera-
peutic procedure was carried out by one of the professors in the
department. The side to be operated on was selected randomly
(case group) and the other side underwent surgery after an injec-
tion of lidocaine 2% with 1:100,000 epinephrine (nerve block or
in

filtration techniques) at a second visit (control group) with the

two-week washout.

If pain was present, an attempt was made to induce anaes-

thesia; if it was not successful (feeling of pain in the soft tissue of
the area by application of a sharp-pointed instrument such as an
explorer or a needle), a supplementary local anaesthetic agent
was injected. Appropriate post-hypnosis suggestions were given
and the previous suggestions such as anaesthesia of the hand
and muscle relaxation were eliminated, following which the
patient was returned to the normal state by observing the
principles of hypnotherapy. The patient was asked to bite on
a sterile gauze pad at the surgical site for 30 min. Haemorrhage
from that area was evaluated. If there was no haemorrhage the
patient was discharged. If haemorrhage persisted, the gauze pad
was left in place for another 30 min and the area was re-
evaluated. Any active oozing from the area after 30 min was
considered haemorrhage. The patients were contacted by phone

at 5-, 12-, 24-, and 48-h post-operative intervals to evaluate
haemorrhage (

Enqvist et al., 1995

;

Nooh, 2009

). Pain was scored

using a VAS (visual analogue scale). The patients were asked to
mark pain intensity at 5-, 12-, 24-, and 48-h post-operative
intervals on a horizontal line graded from 0 to 10. The patients
were given Gelofen capsules (Ibuprofen) for pain relief and were
asked to take the medicine if pain persisted and record the
number

of

the

tablets

taken.

All

the

above-mentioned

measurements were recorded for both sides of each patient.
Data was analyzed by McNemar

’s and Wilcoxon’s signed ranks

tests and t-test using SPSS 18.

3. Results

In this study 24 patients were evaluated; there were 14 men

(58.3%) and 10 women (41.7%). The mean age of the subjects was
24.1

 2.7 years, with mean ages of 23.6  1.9 and 24.7  3.7 for

males and females, respectively. The age range of the subjects was
18

e30 years, with 21e27 and 18e30 years for males and females,

respectively. A total of 48 third molars were extracted: 15 right
upper third molars, 15 left upper third molars, 9 right lower third
molars and 9 left lower third molars. In each patient, one-third
molar was extracted under hypnosis and the other under local
anaesthesia. All the patients were in the ASA 1 category (normal)
with no medical history.

Only two patients in the hypnosis group (case) reported pain

after induction of hypnosis (8.3%), with 22 patients (91.7%)
reporting no pain. In the local anaesthesia group (control), 8
patients (33.3%) reported pain during the procedure despite
complete anaesthesia of the tongue and the adjacent mucosa,
demonstrating statistically signi

ficant differences between the two

groups. The patients were asked to stay in the department for
30 min after the procedure so that haemorrhage could be evalu-
ated. The results showed less haemorrhage in patients who had
undergone hypnosis, with signi

ficant differences with the patients

who had only received local anaesthesia (

Table 1

).

Tables 1

and

2

show the haemorrhage scores in the two groups,

with signi

ficant differences between the two groups in relation to

the presence of haemorrhage and at 5- and 12-h post-operative

Fig. 1. Pell and Gregory classi

fication.

S.K. Abdeshahi et al. / Journal of Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery 41 (2013) 310

e315

312

intervals. Haemorrhage was greater in the local anaesthesia group
compared to the hypnosis group.

The Spielberger State-Trail Anxiety Inventory was used to

evaluate patient anxiety. The results showed mean anxiety scores
of 46.8

 3.8 and 47.4  3.9 in the local anaesthesia and hypnosis

groups, respectively, revealing very close anxiety scores in the two
groups under study. On the whole, the two procedures were not
signi

ficantly different when the two sides were compared in each

subject. In other words, hypnosis did not result in an increase in
patients

’ anxiety (

Table 3

and

Fig. 2

).

Tables 4

and

5

show post-operative pain severity in patients

based on VAS. Wilcoxon

’s signed rank test showed significant

differences in pain severity at 5- and 12-h post-operative intervals
between the two groups, with patients undergoing hypnosis
reporting less pain.

In this study the patients were asked to take only Gelofen when

they had pain. In the hypnosis group, 10 patients (41.7%) took the
medicine; in the local anaesthesia group, 22 patients (91.7%) took
the medicine. McNemar

’s test revealed statistically significant

differences between the two groups in this regard (P

¼ 0.0001). The

means of the analgesic capsule taken were 1.9

 1.2 (at least one

capsule and at most 5 capsules) and 2.1

1 (at least one capsule and

at most 4 capsules) in the hypnosis and local anaesthesia groups
respectively, with signi

ficant differences between the two groups

(P

¼ 0.021). In addition, the mean days of taking the analgesic post-

operatively were reported to be 1.3

 0.7 (at least one day and at

most three) and 1.2

 0.3 (at least one day and at most two) days in

the hypnosis and local anaesthesia groups, respectively. Wilcoxon

’s

signed ranks test did not reveal any signi

ficant differences in the

number days the analgesic was taken between the two groups
(P

¼ 0.705).

4. Discussion

Hypnosis has been a worldwide controversial issue in dentistry

in recent times; the controversy has spread to the academic circles
in Iran.

Hypnosis in

fluences perceptions and behaviours of individuals

with the help of two factors: use of suggestibility rules and
achieving a state referred to as hypnotic trance. A trance is a state
beyond consciousness, which is different from normal sleep,
unconsciousness and coma, during which there is a high level of
suggestibility (

Chaves, 1997a

,

1997b

;

Elkins et al., 2007

).

Hypnosis has some applications in the treatment of somatic and

psychological problems and is recognized as an adjunct to medicine
in some countries. Various studies have been carried out on its

Table 1
Frequency of pain, oozing and bleeding in case and control groups.

Case

Control

Exact sig.
(2-tailed)

a

Yes
Number (%)

No
Number (%)

Yes
Number (%)

No
Number (%)

P-value

Pain

2 (8.3)

22 (91.7)

8 (33.3)

16 (66.7)

0.04**

Oozing

3 (12.5)

21 (87.5)

11 (45.8)

13 (54.2)

0.008**

Bleeding

6 (25)

18 (75)

16 (66.7)

8 (33.3)

0.021**

**P value signi

ficant.

a

McNemar test.

Table 2
Frequency of bleeding after tooth extraction at different hours in case and control
groups.

Case

Control

Exact sig.
(2-tailed)

a

Bleeding

Bleeding

Yes
Number
(%)

No
Number
(%)

Yes
Number
(%)

No
Number
(%)

P-value

After 5 h

5 (20.8)

19 (79.2)

10 (41.7)

14 (58.3)

0.001**

After 12 h

1 (4.2)

21 (87.5)

5 (20.8)

19 (79.2)

After 24 h

0 (0)

24 (100)

1 (4.2)

23 (95.8)

After 48 h

0 (0)

24 (100)

0 (0)

0 (0)

**P value signi

ficant.

a

McNemar test.

Table 3
Mean, standard deviation, maximum and minimum of anxiety scores in case and
control groups.

Case

Control

Correlation

t

df

Exact sig.
(2-tailed)

a

Mean

 SD

47.4

 3.9

46.8

 3.8

0.440

0.641

23

0.528

Min

37

39

Max

55

54

a

t Test.

Table 4
Frequency of pain after tooth extraction at different hours in case and control group.

Case

Control

Exact sig.
(2-tailed)

a

Pain

Pain

Yes
Number
(%)

No
Number
(%)

Yes
Number
(%)

No
Number
(%)

P-value

After 5 h

19 (79.2)

5 (20.8)

22 (91.7)

2 (8.3)

0.001**

After 12 h

10 (41.7)

14 (58.3)

16 (66.7)

8 (33.3)

After 24 h

6 (25)

18 (75)

8 (33.3)

16 (66.7)

After 48 h

6 (25)

18 (75)

6 (25)

18 (75)

**P value signi

ficant.

a

McNemar test.

Table 5
Mean, standard deviation, maximum and minimum of pain according to VAS in case
and control groups.

Case

Control

Exact sig.
(2-tailed)

a

Pain

Pain

Mean

 SD

Min

Max

Mean

 SD

Min

Max

After 5 h

2

 2.1

0

8

4.5

 2.4

0

9

0.002**

After 12 h

1.6

 1

0

5

2.3

 2.2

0

6

0.033**

After 24 h

0.5

 0.3

0

2

0.8

 0.4

0

5

0.072

After 48 h

0.5

 0.3

0

2

0.7

 0.3

0

2

0.623

**P value signi

ficant.

a

Wilcoxon signed ranks test.

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

Mean of 

anxiety 

score

Patient

,

s number

Case 

Control

Fig. 2. Comparison of mean of anxiety scores obtained by each individual (case and
control).

S.K. Abdeshahi et al. / Journal of Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery 41 (2013) 310

e315

313

applications in different

fields, including dentistry. For example,

hypnosis can be used to decrease stress, phobia, nausea, haemor-
rhage, salivary

flow, and reduce or eliminate pain (

Chaves, 1997a

,

1997b

). The Second World War contributed to the progress of

hypnosis in dentistry. During the war a lot of wounds were in

flicted

on the maxillofacial structures of the soldiers and in many cases
medicines were not readily available; therefore, hypnosis was
applied. After the war, dental practitioners began discussions about
the interesting applications of hypnosis. In 1954 a need arose in
a detention centre, which was not well-equipped with dental
facilities and instruments, for emergency surgery. Twenty-nine
individuals underwent surgery, with good results in 23 of them;
in 4 individuals minor trance was achieved and 3 individuals were
not hypnotized. Dental practitioners continued to create conditions
in which the patients would experience less pain and suffering and
the use of hypnosis has become very common in modern dentistry.
In addition to tooth extraction, hypnosis is used in other dental
procedures with numerous reports indicating that many dental
procedures have been carried out under hypnosis by a large
number of dental practitioners (

Heron, 1954

).

This study evaluated the effect of hypnosis on pain, haemor-

rhage and anxiety after extraction of third molars. The results
showed that of patients undergoing hypnosis only 2 patients re-
ported pain after induction of hypnosis and 22 patients did not
report any pain; there were signi

ficant differences between the

local anaesthesia and hypnosis groups.

In a one-year period a combination of local anaesthesia and

hypnosis on 174 patients 13

e87 years of age showed that hypnosis

resulted in a decrease in pain severity in patients and in 93% of the
cases good progress was achieved in the therapeutic protocols
(

Hermes et al., 2005

).

Andrew and Welbury (1996)

put 20 children under hypnosis

and reported that in 16 children under simultaneous hypnosis and
anaesthesia there was a decrease in pain perception, consistent
with the results of this study. In a study carried out by

Attaran et al.

(2012)

16 subjects of 21 volunteers (76.2%) had a good depth of

anaesthesia and 5 subjects (23.8%) did not exhibit a proper
response to local anaesthesia; the differences between the results
of the two studies might be attributed to the fact that they applied
hypnosis for root canal therapy and it is probable that the difference
between root canal therapy and tooth extraction or problems such
as infection might have resulted in differences in the results.

In relation to immediate post-operative haemorrhage and at 5-

and 12-h post-operative intervals the results of the present study
showed less haemorrhage in the hypnosis group, with statistically
signi

ficant differences between the two groups.

At present one of the uses of hypnosis is in surgical procedures

in patients with coagulation disorders. The effect of stress on the
initiation and control of haemorrhagic attacks is an established fact.
Oral surgery is a common cause of severe anxiety in patients with
haemophilia. Lucas evaluated research studies in this respect,
reporting that hypnosis can be a superb adjunct to control anxiety,
and in haemophiliac patients with a tendency for haemorrhage
during or after the surgical procedure it can signi

ficantly decrease

haemorrhage. In addition, salivary secretions, pain and capillary
haemorrhage can be properly controlled during surgery or after it.
Furthermore, some oral habits such as brushing and use of dental
floss, which are very important for the oral hygiene of such
patients, can be suggested under hypnosis (

Lucas, 1975

).

Some other studies have evaluated the effect of hypnosis on

reducing haemorrhage and duration of patient hospitalization, all
showing the positive effect of hypnosis on haemorrhage.

Enqvist et al. put a number of patients under hypnosis tape in

different phases of treatment, including 18 patients during preop-
erative treatment, 18 patients during pre-and perioperative

treatment, and 24 patients perioperatively only. The amount of
blood loss in the patients was equal to 30%, 26% and 9% in groups
one to three, respectively (

Enqvist et al., 1995

). Rapkin et al. put 15

patients under hypnosis, who were candidates for head and neck
surgery and compared them with 21 patients who did not go under
hypnosis, reporting that hypnosis reduced haemorrhage and other
surgical complications; it even decreased the duration of patient
hospitalization (

Rapkin et al., 1991

).

Defechereux et al. showed in their research study that from 197

thyroidectomies and 21 cervical explorations for hyperparathy-
roidism which were under hypno-anaesthesia, all patients having
hypno-anaesthesia reported a signi

ficantly less haemorrhage.

Hospital stay was also signi

ficantly shorter, providing a substantial

reduction in the costs of medical care. The post-operative conva-
lescence was signi

ficantly improved after hypno-anaesthesia and

a full return to social or professional activity was signi

ficantly

quicker (

Defechereux et al., 1999

).

A meta-analysis of studies of the effect of hypnosis in surgical

patients was performed by Montgomery et al. The results indicated
that patients in the hypnosis treatment groups had better clinical
outcomes than 89% of patients in the control groups and less
haemorrhage (

Montgomery et al., 2001

).

This study showed a close similarity of anxiety scores between

the two groups and comparison of each subject with themselves
did not reveal any signi

ficant differences; in other words, hypnosis

did not increase patient anxiety.

Researchers believe hypnosis decreases patient anxiety in rela-

tion to dental procedures. Currently one of the most common uses
of hypnosis is to decrease patient anxiety and fear of dental
procedures. Huet et al. carried out a study on 30 children 5

e12

years of age and reported that the median modi

fied Yale preoper-

ative anxiety scale was signi

ficantly lower in the hypnosis group

than in the non-hypnosis group (

Huet et al., 2011

).

Moore et al. evaluated 25 patients (the hypnosis group) and

compared them with 31 patients (no hypnosis group) and showed
that hypnosis reduces patient anxiety during dental procedures
(

Moore et al., 1996

).

Eitner et al. put an extremely anxious patient with intense fear

of dental procedures under hypnosis and measured the patient

’s

heart rate, blood pressure and blood cortisol level, reporting that
hypnosis can reduce anxiety even in extremely anxious patients
(

Eitner et al., 2006

).

The results of this study showed that when patients were under

hypnosis and local anaesthesia, they reported less pain after tooth
extraction and took fewer analgesics, which is consistent with the
results of other studies. There are a large number of medical studies
on the effect of hypnosis on pain decrease and use of fewer anal-
gesics. In a review study carried out by Montgomery et al. on 18
studies about the effect of hypnosis on pain decrease and use of
fewer analgesics the results showed that hypnosis decreases the
surgical complications and the number of analgesics used, resulting
in fast recovery of patients (

Montgomery et al., 2000

,

2001

).

Mauer et al. (2002)

showed that hypnosis decreases patient pain

in orthopaedic operations on the hand. Sixty hand-surgery patients
received the usual treatment or usual treatment plus hypnosis. The
hypnosis group showed signi

ficant decreases in measures of

perceived pain intensity, perceived pain affect. In addition the
physician

’s ratings of progress were significantly higher for exper-

imental subjects than for controls, and the experimental group had
signi

ficantly fewer medical complications. Defechereux et al.

showed that all patients (218 cases) having hypno-anaesthesia re-
ported signi

ficantly less post-operative pain and analgesic use

(

Defechereux et al., 1999

).

Lang et al. put 82 patients who were candidates for invasive

medical procedures under self-hypnotic relaxation and compared

S.K. Abdeshahi et al. / Journal of Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery 41 (2013) 310

e315

314

them with 159 patients who did not go under hypnosis. It was re-
ported that self-hypnotic relaxation proved bene

ficial during

invasive medical procedures. Hypnosis had more pronounced
effects on pain and anxiety reduction, and is superior, in that it also
improves haemodynamic stability (

Lang et al., 2000

).

There is evidence that hypnosis can affect pain processing

pathways in the brain. Rainville et al. provided PET (positron
emission tomography) scans of some volunteers who burned their
hands with hot water. Induction of hypnosis in these volunteers
resulted in reports by the volunteers that water was not painful and
burning. PET scan during hypnosis showed a signi

ficant decrease in

the activity in the anterior cingulate cortex, which is the part of the
brain involved in emotions and stresses and can in

fluence inhibi-

tion of pain. On the other hand, PET scan results did not reveal any
decrease in the activity of somatosensory cortex during hypnosis,
which is the part of the brain processing perception of pain
(

Rainville et al., 2003

). These

findings show that even if the brain

perceives pain, hypnosis helps patients alter pain experience so
that the patient does not feel any pain and discomfort (

Patterson,

1996

). In addition, hypnosis can be used successfully in reducing

different forms of pain. Hypnosis is used in burn victims along with
debridement and cleansing of burn wounds to decrease pain and
anxiety as a result of burns. In addition, in patients with cancer,
hypnosis can help decrease pain and suffering of a large number of
painful procedures, including chemotherapy and nausea. Further-
more, hypnosis can decrease the frequency and severity of migraine
and tension headaches (

Barber, 1996

).

5. Conclusion

The results of this study show that hypnosis might be used as an

adjunctive method in dental procedures of anxious patients or
patients who cannot be treated using conventional methods. It
should be pointed out that hypnosis is possible when the dental
practitioner is adequately experienced in this respect and the
patients are carefully selected.

Acknowledgements

This study was supported by Kerman University of Medical

Sciences. The authors would like to thank the Research Deputy for
their

financial support (Thesis No: 721).

References

Andrew SH, Welbury R: The use of hypnosis in a sedation clinic for dental

extractions in children. Dent Child 63: 418

e420, 1996

Attaran N, Bidar M, Gharehchahi M, Ghabel NM, Hafez B: Clinical evaluation of

hypnotism-Induced local anaesthesia in endodontics. No 219, Presented at the
2012 AAPM Annual Meeting

Barber J: Headache. In: Barber Joseph (ed.), Hypnosis and suggestion in the treat-

ment of pain. New York: Norton, 158

e184, 1996

Bassi GS, Humphris GM, Longman LP: The etiology and management of gagging:

a review of the literature. J Prosthet Dent 91: 459

e467, 2004

Chaves JF: Hypnosis in dentistry: historical overview and current appraisal. In:

Mehrstedt M, Wikstrom P-O (eds), Hypnosis in dentistry: hypnosis interna-
tional monographs, 3rd edn. Munich: MEG-Stiftung, 5

e23, 1997b

Chaves JF: Hypnotic control of pain: historical perspectives and future prospects. Int

J Clin Exp Hypn 45: 356

e376, 1997a

Choi HJ, Kim JH, Lee YM, Lee JH: Pseudoaneurysm of the facial artery after the

injection of local anesthetics. J Craniofac Surg 23: 419

e421, 2012

Cuellar NG: Hypnosis for pain management in the older adult. Pain Manag Nurs 3:

105

e111, 2005

Daniels LK: Treatment of migraine headache by hypnosis and behavior therapy:

a case study. Am J Clin Hypn 19: 241, 1977

Defechereux T, Meurisse M, Hamoir E, Gollogly L, Joris J, Faymonville ME: Hypno-

anesthesia for endocrine cervical surgery: a statement of practice. J Altern
Complement Med 5: 509

e520, 1999

Eitner S, Schultze, Heckmann J, Wichmann M, Holst H: Changes in neurophysiologic

parameters in a patient with dental anxiety by hypnosis during surgical
treatment. J Oral Rehabil 33: 496

e500, 2006

Elkins G, Jensen MP, Patterson DR: Hypnotherapy for the management of chronic

pain. Int J Clin Exp Hypn 55: 275

e287, 2007

Enqvist B, von Konow L, Bystedt H: Pre- and perioperative suggestion in maxillo-

facial surgery: effects on blood loss and recovery. Int J Clin Exp Hypn 43: 284

e

294, 1995

Erdogmus S, Govsa F, Celik S: Anatomic position of the lingual nerve in the

mandibular third molar region as potential risk factors for nerve palsy.
J Craniofac Surg 19: 264

e270, 2008

Flammer E, Bongartz W: On the ef

ficacy of hypnosis: a meta- analytic study. Con-

temp Hypn 4: 179

e197, 2003

Gerschman JA: Hypnoiability and dental phobic disorders. Anesth Prog 36: 127

e

139, 1989

Habal MB: Fear no more for health care reform is here and is here to stay.

J Craniofac Surg 20: 711

e712, 2009

Hermes D, Truebger D, Hakim SG, Sieg PJ: Tape recorded hypnosis in oral and

maxillofacial surgery basics and

first clinical experience. J Craniomaxillofac Surg

33: 123

e129, 2005

Heron WT: Clinical applications of hypnosis in dentistry. Dent Surv 30: 331

e333,

1954

Huet A, Lucas-Polomeni MM, Robert JC, Sixou JL, Wodey E: Hypnosis and dental

anaesthesia in children: a prospective controlled study. Int J Clin Exp Hypn 59:
424

e440, 2011

Islam S, Ahmed M, Walton GM, Dinan TG, Hoffman GR: The prevalence of

psychological distress in a sample of facial trauma victims. A comparative cross-
sectional study between UK and Australia. J Craniomaxillofac Surg 40: 82

e85,

2012

Joseph B: The mysterious persistence of hypnotic analgesia. Int J Clin Exp Hypn 4:

28

e43, 1998

Kvaal K, Ulstein I, Nordhus IH, Engedal K: The Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety

Inventory (STAI): the state scale in detecting mental disorders in geriatric
patients. Int J Geriatr Psychiatry 20: 629

e634, 2005

Lang EV, Benotsch EG, Fick LJ, Lutgendorf S, Berbaum ML, Berbaum KS, et al:

Adjunctive non-pharmacological analgesia for invasive medical procedures:
a randomized trial. Lancet 355: 1486

e1490, 2000

Lucas ON: The use of hypnosis in hemophilia dental care. Ann N Y Acad Sci 240:

263

e266, 1975

Mauer MG, Burnett KF, Ouellette EA, Ironson GH, Dandes HM: Medical hypnosis

and orthopedic hand surgery: pain perception, postoperative recovery, and
therapeutic comfort. Inter J Clin Exper Hypn 47: 144

e161, 2002

Montgomery GH, David D, Winkel G, Silverstein JH, Bovbjerg DH: The effectiveness

of adjunctive hypnosis with surgical patients: a meta-analysis. Anesth Analg 94:
1639

e1645, 2001

Montgomery GH, DuHamel KN, Redd WN: A meta-analysis of hypnotic analgesia:

how effective is hypnosis? Inter J Clin Exper Hypn 48: 138

e153, 2000

Moore R, Abrahamsen R, Brødsgaard I: Hypnosis compared with group therapy and

individual desensitization for dental anxiety. Eur J Oral Sci 104: 612

e618, 1996

Nooh N: The effect of aspirin on bleeding after extraction of teeth. Saudi Dent J 21:

57

e61, 2009

Page RA, Handley GW: A comparison of the effects of standardized Chiasson and

eye-closure inductions on susceptibility scores. Am J Clin Hypn 34: 46

e50, 1991

Patterson D: Burn pain. In: Barber Joseph (ed.), Hypnosis and suggestion in the

treatment of pain. New York: Norton, 267

e302, 1996

Rainville P, Duncan GH, Price DD, Carrier B, Bushnell MC: Pain affect encoded in

human anterior cingulated but not somatosensory cortex. Science 277: 968

e

971, 2003

Rapkin DA, Straubing M, Holroyd JC: Guided imagery, hypnosis and recovery from

head and neck cancer surgery: an exploratory study. Int J Clin Exp Hypn 39:
215

e226, 1991

Rosen R, Harold E: The hypnotic and hypnotherapeutic investigation and deter-

mination of symptom-function. J Chin Exper Hypn 3: 201

e219, 1954

Ross PJ: Hypnosis as a counseling tool. Brit J Guid Coun 2: 173

e179, 1981

S.K. Abdeshahi et al. / Journal of Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery 41 (2013) 310

e315

315