Review

Melatonin and mitochondrial dysfunction in the central nervous system

Daniel P. Cardinali

, Eleonora S. Pagano, Pablo A. Scacchi Bernasconi, Roxana Reynoso, Pablo Scacchi

Ponti

ficia Universidad Católica Argentina, Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, 1107 Buenos Aires, Argentina

a b s t r a c t

a r t i c l e i n f o

Available online 25 February 2012

Keywords:
Melatonin
Mitochondria
Free radicals
Oxidative stress
Aging
Parkinson's disease
Alzheimer's disease
Huntington's disease
Melatonin analogs

This article is part of a Special Issue "Hormones & Neurotrauma".

Cell death and survival are critical events for neurodegeneration, mitochondria being increasingly seen as im-
portant determinants of both. Mitochondrial dysfunction is considered a major causative factor in Alzheimer's
disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD). Increased free radical generation, en-
hanced mitochondrial inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase activity and NO production, and disrupted electron
transport system and mitochondrial permeability transition, have all been involved in impaired mitochondrial
function. Melatonin, the major secretory product of the pineal gland, is an antioxidant and an effective protector
of mitochondrial bioenergetic function. Both in vitro and in vivo, melatonin was effective to prevent oxidative
stress/nitrosative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction seen in experimental models of AD, PD and HD.
These effects are seen at doses 2

–3 orders of magnitude higher than those required to affect sleep and circadian

rhythms, both conspicuous targets of melatonin action. Melatonin is selectively taken up by mitochondria, a
function not shared by other antioxidants. A limited number of clinical studies indicate that melatonin can im-
prove sleep and circadian rhythm disruption in PD and AD patients. More recently, attention has been focused
on the development of potent melatonin analogs with prolonged effects which were employed in clinical trials
in sleep-disturbed or depressed patients in doses considerably higher than those employed for melatonin. In
view that the relative potencies of the analogs are higher than that of the natural compound, clinical trials
employing melatonin in the range of 50

–100 mg/day are needed to assess its therapeutic validity in neurodegen-

erative disorders.

© 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Contents

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

323

Mitochondrial function and free radical generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

323

Basic physiology of melatonin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

324

Melatonin and mitochondrial function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

324

Melatonin and mitochondrial dysfunction in AD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

325

Melatonin and mitochondrial dysfunction in PD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

327

Melatonin and mitochondrial dysfunction in HD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

327

Melatonin and its analogs as pharmaceutical tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

327

Conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

328

Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

328

References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

328

Hormones and Behavior 63 (2013) 322

–330

Abbreviations: AD, Alzheimer's disease; AFMK, N

1

-acetyl-N

2

-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine; AMK, N

1

-acetyl-5-methoxykynuramine; A

β, aggregated β-amyloid; c-mtNOS, constitutive

mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase; ETC, electron transport chain; GPx, glutathione peroxidase; GRd, glutathione reductase; GSH, reduced glutathione; HD, Huntington's disease; i-mtNOS,
inducible mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase; iNOS, inducible nitric oxide synthase; MPP

+

, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium; mPT, mitochondrial permeability transition; MPTP, 1-methyl-4-

phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine; MT

1

, melatonin receptor 1; MT

2

, melatonin receptor 2; mtDNA, mitochondrial DNA; nNOS, neuronal nitric oxide synthase; NO, nitric oxide; OXPHOS, oxi-

dative phosphorylation; PD, Parkinson's disease; RNS, reactive nitrogen species; ROS, reactive oxygen species; SOD, superoxide dismutase.

⁎ Corresponding author at: Departamento de Docencia e Investigación, Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Pontificia Universidad Católica Argentina, Av. Alicia Moreau de Justo 1500,

4

o

piso, 1107 Buenos Aires, Argentina.

E-mail addresses:

danielcardinali@uca.edu.ar

,

danielcardinali@

fibertel.com.ar

(D.P. Cardinali).

0018-506X/$

– see front matter © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

doi:

10.1016/j.yhbeh.2012.02.020

Contents lists available at

SciVerse ScienceDirect

Hormones and Behavior

j o u r n a l h o m e p a g e : w w w . e l s e v i e r . c o m / l o c a t e / y h b e h

Introduction

Cell death and survival are critical events in neurodegeneration,

and mitochondria are increasingly seen as important determinants
of both. Abnormalities in mitochondrial functions such as defects in
the electron transport chain (ETC)/oxidative phosphorylation
(OXPHOS) system and ATP production have been suggested as the
primary causative factors in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative
disorders (

Beal, 2009; DiMauro and Schon, 2008; Rezin et al., 2009;

Rollins et al., 2009; Schon et al., 2010

). Mitochondria act as energy

suppliers and signaling mediators in the capacity of the cells to pro-
duce energy from atmospheric oxygen. Electrons from metabolic sub-
strates are transferred via the ETC to molecular oxygen (O

2

), giving

rise to a H

+

electrochemical gradient whose energy is used to synthe-

size ATP (

Brand and Nicholls, 2011

).

Mitochondrial dysfunction underlies neurodegenerative diseases

of different etiologies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkin-
son's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD). Generally these
age-related disorders share mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative/
nitrosative stress and increased apoptosis in different areas of the
brain. In the case of AD, decreases in mRNA expression of mitochon-
drial DNA (mtDNA) encoding cytochrome oxidase subunit II have
been reported (

Bonilla et al., 1999

). Aggregated

β-amyloid (Aβ) gen-

erates reactive oxygen species (ROS) that produce neuronal death by
damage of neuronal membrane lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. Pro-
tection from A

β toxicity by melatonin was observed, especially at the

mitochondrial level (

Dragicevic et al., 2011; Olcese et al., 2009

). This

is the basis for the use of an antioxidant like melatonin in AD patients
(see for ref.

Cardinali et al., 2010

).

Mitochondrial involvement in PD is suggested by de

ficiencies in

components of the ETC like Complex (C)-I in substantia nigra with a
parallel reduction in reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, indicating
the existence of oxidative stress (

Navarro and Boveris, 2010

). In

platelets of PD patients C-I is also decreased, and in some cases is ac-
companied by C-II, C-III and C-IV de

ficiencies. Studies with cybrids

have shown that alterations in C-I is due to a defect in the mtDNA
(

Navarro and Boveris, 2010

). This defect is accompanied by an alter-

ation in the expression of C-IV activity and a reduced H

+

electrochem-

ical gradient, which lowers the apoptotic threshold. Mitochondrial
involvement in the pathology of PD has been genetically supported by
the

finding in early-onset Parkinsonism of mutations in DNA polymer-

ase

γ, which is the only DNA polymerase present in mitochondria and

necessary for mtDNA synthesis (

Luoma et al., 2004

).

In the case of HD, de

ficiencies in the activity of C-II, C-III and C-IV in

caudate and to a lesser extent in putamen of patients have been
reported (

Schapira, 1999

). In mitochondria from frontal and temporal

lobes of HD patients a mtDNA deletion was found (

Horton et al., 1995

).

Enhanced production of ROS and possibly accumulation of mtDNA

mutations in post mitotic cells are contributory factors in neurode-
generation. Mitochondria not only generate ROS/reactive nitrogen
species (RNS) but are also the main target for their actions (

Raha

and Robinson, 2000

). As a result, damage occurs in the mitochondrial

respiratory chain, producing further increases in free radical gener-
ation and leading ultimately to a vicious cycle (

Genova et al.,

2004

).

During the last decade a number of studies have demonstrated

that melatonin plays an effective role in regulating mitochondrial ho-
meostasis (see for ref.

Acuña Castroviejo et al., 2011; Srinivasan et al.,

2011c

). In addition to being a free radical scavenger, melatonin re-

duces nitric oxide (NO) generation within mitochondria. It maintains
the electron

flow, the efficiency of OXPHOS, ATP production, the bioen-

ergetic function of the cell and mitochondrial biogenesis by regulating
respiratory complex activities, Ca

2+

in

flux and the mitochondrial per-

meability transition (mPT). This article summarizes the several mecha-
nisms through which melatonin can exert neuroprotective actions in
neurodegenerative disorders like AD, PD and HD.

Mitochondrial function and free radical generation

The primary function of mitochondria is to generate ATP within

the cell through the ETC resulting in OXPHOS. Mitochondrial energy
production requires the coordination of several sequential steps
tightly interconnected. Even under normal conditions, 1

–2% of elec-

tron

flux is the consequence of the incomplete reduction of O

2

, lead-

ing to the production of superoxide anion radical (O

2

) that is

subsequently converted into hydrogen peroxide (H

2

O

2

). Hence, the

mitochondria are the main source of ROS production within cells
(

Beal, 2009; DiMauro and Schon, 2008; Rezin et al., 2009; Rollins

et al., 2009; Schon et al., 2010

). For a recent, detailed, review of mito-

chondrial physiology see

Acuña Castroviejo et al. (2011)

.

While a mild increase in ROS can act as a signal to elicit a number

of physiological responses, a pervasive augment in free radical pro-
duction or a burst of oxidative damage risks mitochondrial integrity
leading to cell death. For example, O

2

production is very sensitive

to a decrease in H

+

electrochemical gradient. The modulation of H

+

permeability at the mitochondrial inner membrane via uncoupling
proteins, mitochondrial ion channels or fatty acids is an important
event in the regulation of free radical production by mitochondria
(

Beal, 2009; DiMauro and Schon, 2008; Rezin et al., 2009; Rollins

et al., 2009; Schon et al., 2010

).

ETC, which is present in the inner mitochondrial membrane, com-

prises a series of electron carriers grouped into four enzyme com-
plexes, namely C-I (NADH ubiquinone reductase), C-II (succinate
ubiquinone reductase), C-III (ubiquinol cytochrome c-reductase),
and C-IV (cytochrome c oxidase) (

Lenaz and Genova, 2010

). The

main function of ETC is to convert redox energy into an electro-
chemical gradient of protons that subsequently causes ATP forma-
tion. The end product of the respiratory chain is water that is
generated in a four-electron reduction of O

2

by C-IV. During this

process (electron leakage, especially at complexes I and III), a
small percentage of O

2

is converted into ROS, such as O

2

and its

secondary products H

2

O

2

and reactive hydroxyl radical (

•OH).

Under normal conditions, the iron

–sulfur cluster N2 of complex I ap-

pears to be the primary source of free radicals in the brain (

Lenaz

and Genova, 2010

).

Melatonin reacts at a high rate with radicals like

•OH and with rel-

ative low rates with other like O

2

. Melatonin is an ef

ficient inhibitor

of lipid peroxidation by scavenging highly reactive species, such as
•OH, which initiate the degradation process, than by directly trapping
peroxyl radicals (

Galano et al., 2011

).

Mitochondrial NO synthase (mtNOS), localized in the inner mito-

chondrial membrane, is responsible for generating NO radical (

•NO)

from

L

-arginine (

Esposito and Cuzzocrea, 2010

). mtNOS is the neuro-

nal NOS (nNOS) splice variant-

α which interacts with C-IV; mtNOS

comprises two isoforms, namely constitutive (c-mtNOS) and induc-
ible (i-mtNOS). Because of the easy NO diffusion through the mito-
chondrial membrane, cytoplasm NOS isoforms are also relevant for
generating intramitochondrial

•NO. High rates of •NO synthesis,

which typically occur in the Ca

2+

-dependent excited state of neurons,

contribute to oxidative and nitrosative stress. The availability of

•NO

determines the rates at which the adduct peroxynitrite (ONOO

)

and the other decomposition products are generated.

•NO strongly interferes with components of the respiratory chain,

in particular cytochrome c oxidase (

Esposito and Cuzzocrea, 2010;

Mander and Brown, 2004

). Its metabolite ONOO

and radicals de-

rived from this can damage proteins at the respiratory complexes.
Other nitrosation processes, like transnitrosation or reversible nitro-
sation and nitration as well as irreversible DNA, protein and lipid ox-
idation, may occur (

Stadtman and Levine, 2003

). Damage to the

mitochondrial ETC can cause a breakdown of the H

+

potential, apo-

ptosis or lead to further generation of free radicals, thus maintaining
a vicious cycle that ultimately results in cell death (

Lenaz and

Genova, 2010

).

323

D.P. Cardinali et al. / Hormones and Behavior 63 (2013) 322

–330

Melatonin protects ETC and mtDNA from ROS/RNS-induced oxida-

tive damage. It limits the loss of intramitochondrial GSH, reduces
mtDNA damage and increases expression and activity of C-IV and
the activity of C-I, thus improving mitochondrial respiration and in-
creasing ATP production (

Acuña Castroviejo et al., 2011

). NO produc-

tion is also inhibited at the level of NOS gene transcription (

Jimenez-

Ortega et al., 2009

).

Mitochondrial Ca

2+

is crucial in rate control of energy production

and plays an instrumental role in cell apoptosis and necrosis. Mito-
chondria take up Ca

2+

through a calcium uniporter, highly dependent

on H

+

electrochemical gradient (

Oliveira, 2011

). In the mitochondrial-

mediated cell death pathway, a non-speci

fic increase in the permeability

of the inner mitochondrial membrane (mPT) occurs as a consequence of
the increase in mitochondrial matrix Ca

2+

. mPT de

fines the sudden in-

crease in membrane permeability allowing the transfer of molecules up
to 1500 Da in size and causing the dissipation of H

+

electrochemical gra-

dient, uncoupling of OXPHOS and ATP depletion (

Lemasters et al., 2009

).

With Ca

2+

overload, there is a complete uniporter inhibition, mitochon-

drial swelling, loss of respiratory control and a release of matrix calcium.
Under these conditions, the mitochondria undergo swelling and mito-
chondrial apoptosis ensues (

Toman and Fiskum, 2011

). Although the

exact molecular nature of mPT remains elusive, its contribution to neuro-
degeneration is unequivocal and has been extensively reviewed
(

Gleichmann and Mattson, 2011; Pivovarova and Andrews, 2010

). Mela-

tonin effectively prevents induction of mPT in a number of circumstances
(

Andrabi et al., 2004; Karbownik et al., 2000

).

Since mitochondria contain speci

fic mechanisms for activating

both the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and necrotic death in a variety
of cell types, they can be seen as central regulators of cell fate. The in-
trinsic apoptotic pathway involves the activation and subsequent
translocation to mitochondria of the members of the Bcl2 family
(Bax, Bak, and Bid) which after insertion in the mitochondrial outer
membrane behave as death channels. Through these channels a num-
ber of apoptogenic proteins e.g. cytochrome c, are released from the
intermembrane space and are responsible for the activation of the
signal cascade to cell death via caspase-9 and -3-dependent proteoly-
sis (

Santucci et al., 2010

). Melatonin exerts a strong antiapoptotic ef-

fect (

Sainz et al., 2003

).

A number of enzyme mechanisms take part in the control of free

radical production. Among these is the action of the enzyme superox-
ide dismutase (SOD), which is found in the inner side of the inner mi-
tochondrial membrane (Mn-SOD) and that removes O

2

(

Liochev

and Fridovich, 2010

). The

•OH generated from H

2

O

2

in the presence

of reduced transition metals is scavenged by the enzyme glutathione
peroxidase (GPx) during the process of GSH oxidation to glutathione
disul

fide. This is reduced back to GSH by the enzyme glutathione re-

ductase (GRd). These enzymes form part of the endogenous antioxi-
dant defense system and suppress ROS levels within the cell as well
as at the mitochondria.

Besides being an antioxidant, melatonin promotes de novo syn-

thesis of GSH by stimulating the activity of the enzyme

γ-glutamyl-

cysteine synthetase (

Urata et al., 1999

and also through its effects

on gene expression of GPx, GRd, SOD and CAT (

Antolin et al., 1996;

Jimenez-Ortega et al., 2009; Pablos et al., 1998; Rodriguez et al.,
2004

). This promotes the recycling of GSH and maintains a high

GSH/glutathione disul

fide ratio, thus underlining the important role

that melatonin plays in mitochondrial physiology.

Basic physiology of melatonin

Melatonin is the major secretory product of the pineal gland re-

leased every day at night. In all mammals, circulating melatonin is
synthesized primarily in the pineal gland (

Claustrat et al., 2005

). In

addition, melatonin is also locally synthesized in various cells, tissues
and organs including lymphocytes, bone marrow, the thymus, the

gastrointestinal tract, skin and the eyes, where it plays either an auto-
crine or paracrine role (see for ref.

Hardeland et al., 2011

).

Both in animals and in humans, melatonin participates in diverse

physiological functions signaling not only the length of the night
(and thus time of the day and season of the year) but also enhancing
free radical scavenging and the immune response, showing relevant
cytoprotective properties (

Hardeland et al., 2011

).

As above mentioned, melatonin is a powerful antioxidant that

scavenges

•OH radicals as well as other ROS and RNS and that gives

rise to a cascade of metabolites that share also antioxidant properties
(

Galano et al., 2011

). Melatonin also acts indirectly to promote gene

expression of antioxidant enzymes and to inhibit gene expression of
prooxidant enzymes (

Antolin et al., 1996; Jimenez-Ortega et al.,

2009; Pablos et al., 1998; Rodriguez et al., 2004

). Melatonin has sig-

ni

ficant anti-inflammatory properties presumably by decreasing the

synthesis of proin

flammatory cytokines like TNF-α and by suppres-

sing inducible NOS (iNOS) gene expression (

Cuzzocrea et al., 1998

).

It has also a signi

ficant antiapoptotic effect (

Sainz et al., 2003

).

Circulating melatonin binds to albumin (

Cardinali et al., 1972

and

is metabolized mainly in the liver where it is hydroxylated in the C6
position by cytochrome P

450

monooxygenases A2 and 1A (

Facciola

et al., 2001; Hartter et al., 2001

). Melatonin is then conjugated with

sulfate to form 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, the main melatonin metabolite
found in urine. Melatonin is also metabolized in tissues by oxidative
pyrrole-ring cleavage into kynuramine derivatives. The primary cleav-
age product is N

1

-acetyl-N

2

-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK),

which is deformylated, either by arylamine formamidase or hemoper-
oxidase to N

1

-acetyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AMK) (

Hardeland et al.,

2009

). It has been proposed that AFMK is the primitive and primary ac-

tive metabolite of melatonin (

Tan et al., 2007

). Melatonin is also con-

verted into cyclic 3-hydroxymelatonin in a process that directly
scavenges two hydroxyl radicals (

Tan et al., 2007

). However, although

direct radical scavenging has been effective under numerous experi-
mental conditions, at clearly supraphysiological concentrations, its rele-
vance at physiological levels has been questioned for reasons of
stoichiometry. Despite of this, melatonin was shown to protect from
oxidotoxicity already at physiological concentrations (

Galano et al.,

2011; Tan et al., 1994

).

Melatonin exerts many physiological actions by acting on mem-

brane and nuclear receptors while other actions are receptor-
independent (e.g., scavenging of free radicals or interaction with cy-
toplasm proteins) (

Reiter et al., 2009

). The two melatonin receptors

cloned so far (MT

1

and MT

2

) are membrane receptors that have

seven membrane domains and that belong to the superfamily of G-
protein coupled receptors (

Dubocovich et al., 2010

). Melatonin recep-

tor activation induces a variety of responses that are mediated both
by pertussis-sensitive and insensitive G

i

proteins. In the cytoplasm

melatonin interacts with proteins like calmodulin and tubulin
(

Benitez-King, 2006

). Nuclear receptors of retinoic acid receptor su-

perfamily (retinoid Z receptor/ROR, retinoic acid receptor-related or-
phan receptor

α) have been identified in several cells, among them in

human lymphocytes and monocytes (

Carrillo-Vico et al., 2006

).

Melatonin and mitochondrial function

According to

Acuña Castroviejo et al. (2011)

a role of melatonin in

mitochondrial homeostasis seems warranted. Melatonin is a powerful
scavenger of ROS and RNS and naturally acts on mitochondria, the site
with the highest ROS/RNS production into the cell. Melatonin im-
proves the GSH redox cycling and increases GSH content by stimulat-
ing its synthesis in the cytoplasm, mitochondria depending on the
GSH uptake from cytoplasm to maintain the GSH redox cycling. Last-
ly, melatonin exerts important antiapoptotic effects and most of the
apoptotic signals originate from the mitochondria.

As above mentioned, data accumulated in the last decade strongly

indicate that melatonin plays an important role in antioxidant

324

D.P. Cardinali et al. / Hormones and Behavior 63 (2013) 322

–330

defense via the regulation of enzymes involved in the redox pathway
and directly through the non-enzymatic, radical scavenger effect that
melatonin and some of its metabolites (notably AFMK and AMK) have
to scavenge ROS, RNS and organic radicals (

Hardeland et al., 2011;

Reiter et al., 2009

). Hydrogen transfer and electron transfer have

been identi

fied as the main mechanisms determining the free radi-

cal-scavenging activity of melatonin (

Galano et al., 2011

). Melatonin

reacts at a high rate with radicals like

•OH and with relative low

rates with other like O

2

. In any event, melatonin ef

ficiently inhibits

lipid peroxidation by scavenging highly reactive species, such as

•OH,

which initiate the degradation process, than by directly trapping per-
oxyl radicals. An alternate concept intends to explain the antioxidant
effects of melatonin at the level of radical generation rather than de-
toxi

fication of radicals already formed (

Hardeland, 2005, 2009;

Hardeland et al., 2003

).

In a recent publication Galano et al. underlined the reasons why

melatonin has most of the desirable characteristics of a good antioxi-
dant: (i) it is widely distributed in the body, and is present in ade-
quate concentrations; (ii) it is a broad spectrum antioxidant; (iii) it
easily transported across cellular membranes; (iv) it can be regener-
ated, after radical quenching, and its metabolites still present antiox-
idant properties; (v) it has minimal toxicity (

Galano et al., 2011

).

These effects of melatonin and its metabolites may be unique and
not shared by MT

1

/MT

2

melatonergic agonists like ramelteon or ago-

melatine, in which the indole ring is modi

fied. For example, ramel-

teon displayed in vitro no relevant antioxidant capacity in a 2,2-
azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) assay compared
with melatonin (

Mathes et al., 2008

).

Safeguarding of respiratory electron

flux, reduction of oxidant for-

mation by lowering electron leakage and inhibition of mPT events are
among the most important effects on melatonin in mitochondria.
Melatonin has been repeatedly shown to reduce, under various con-
ditions, the mitochondrial formation of ROS and RNS, to protect
against oxidative, nitrosative or nitrative damage of ETC proteins as
well as lipid peroxidation in the inner membrane and, thus, to favor
electron

flux and energy efficiency. Melatonin (10 mg/kg) was

found to increase the activity of C-I and C-IV in mitochondria
obtained from rat brain and liver, C-II and C-III being not affected
(

Martin et al., 2000b

). Injections of melatonin counteracted the inhib-

itory effect of ruthenium red on C-I, C-IV and GPx enzyme (

Martin

et al., 2000b

). In another study, 100 nM melatonin was found to pre-

vent the oxidation of GSH to glutathione disul

fide induced by t-butyl

hydroperoxide, restoring the normal activity of both GPx and GRd
(

Martin et al., 2000a

). Melatonin increased C-I and C-IV activities in

a dose dependent manner, the effect being signi

ficant at 1 nM. Mela-

tonin also counteracted cyanide induced inhibition of C-IV, showing
that it effectively increases the activity of ETC coupled to OXPHOS
and increase ATP synthesis both in normal mitochondria as well as
in mitochondria depleted of ATP by cyanide (

Martin et al., 2000a

).

The effect of melatonin in regulating C-I and IV presumably do not re-
flect its antioxidant role but indicates an interaction with ETC com-
plexes by donating and accepting electrons, an effect not shared by
other antioxidants. For a recent, detailed, revision on melatonin effect
on mitochondrial function see (

Acuña Castroviejo et al., 2011

).

The possible mechanism by which systemically administered mel-

atonin controls mitochondrial respiration in the liver includes depres-
sion of Krebs's cycle substrate-induced respiration (

Reyes Toso et al.,

2006

). In vitro studies in mitochondria from mouse liver cells, 1 nM to

1 mM melatonin decreased oxygen consumption, inhibited the in-
crease in oxygen

flux in the presence of excess of ADP, reduced mem-

brane potential and inhibited the production of O

2

and H

2

O

2

.

Melatonin was also effective to maintain the ef

ficiency of OXPHOS

and ATP synthesis by increasing the activity of C-I, C-III and C-IV
(

López et al., 2009

).

Interestingly, co-treatment with melatonin prevented the decrease

in mitochondrial membrane

fluidity caused by δ-aminolevulinic acid,

which disrupts H

+

electrochemical gradient and mPT, in the absence

of changes in mitochondrial membrane lipid peroxidation (

Karbownik

et al., 2000

). This effect of melatonin may depend on its capacity to lo-

calize in the membrane itself, in a super

ficial position in lipid bilayers

near the polar heads of membrane phospholipids (

Ceraulo et al.,

1999

).

Melatonin's action in preventing t-butyl hydroperoxide induction

of mPT was shown in primary skeletal muscle cultures. Melatonin
(1

–100 μM) desensitized the mPT to Ca

2+

and prevented t-butyl

hydroperoxide-induced mitochondrial swelling and GSH oxidation
(

Karbownik et al., 2000

). Melatonin has also been reported to directly

inhibit mPT with a K

i

value of 0.8

μM (

Andrabi et al., 2004

). The high

melatonin concentrations needed should be considered in the context
of the reported mitochondrial accumulation of melatonin (

López et al.,

2009; Messner et al., 1998; Venegas et al., 2012

). Melatonin has been

repeatedly shown to prevent, at pharmacological concentrations, a
fatal decline in H

+

electrochemical gradient in various cell types and

with high ef

ficacy against different noxa (

Hardeland and Pandi-

Perumal, 2005

). In cardiomyocytes, astrocytes and striatal neurons,

it prevented calcium overload (

Andrabi et al., 2004; Jou et al., 2004

)

and counteracted the collapse of the mitochondrial membrane poten-
tial induced by H

2

O

2

(

Jou et al., 2004, 2007

), doxorubicin (

Xu and

Ashraf, 2002

) or oxygen/glucose deprivation (

Andrabi et al., 2004

).

Recently the role of melatonin on cardiolipin and mitochondrial

bioenergetics was explored (

Paradies et al., 2010; Petrosillo et al.,

2008

). Cardiolipin, a phospholipid located at the level of inner mito-

chondrial membrane, is required for several mitochondrial bioener-
getic processes as well as in mitochondrial-dependent steps of
apoptosis. Alterations in cardiolipin structure, content and acyl
chain composition have been associated with mitochondrial dysfunc-
tion in various tissues under a variety of pathophysiological condi-
tions (

Paradies et al., 2010

). Melatonin was reported to protect the

mitochondria from oxidative damage in part by preventing cardioli-
pin oxidation (

Paradies et al., 2010; Petrosillo et al., 2008

(

Fig. 1

).

Melatonin can also act on mitochondrial biogenesis via sirtuins.

Sirtuins are NAD

+

-dependent protein deacetylases that promote lon-

gevity in numerous organisms. The 7 mammalian subforms, SIRT1 to
SIRT7, are involved in mitochondrial function. At least SIRT3, SIRT4
and SIRT5 are localized in mitochondria, SIRT3 preventing mitochon-
drial lysine hyperacetylation (

Lombard et al., 2007

). SIRT3 interacts

with the C-I subunit, the 39-kDa protein NDUFA9, to enhance C-I activ-
ity and ATP levels (

Ahn et al., 2008

). Sirtuins also stimulate mitochon-

drial biogenesis (

Guarente, 2008

). Several studies have reported

upregulation of SIRT1 by melatonin, e.g., in the brain of senescence-
accelerated SAMP8 mice (

Gutierrez-Cuesta et al., 2008

) and neuronal

primary cultures from neonatal rat cerebellum (

Tajes et al., 2009

), or

the prevention of SIRT1 decrease in the hippocampus of sleep-
deprived rats (

Chang et al., 2009

). In neuronal cultures from cerebel-

lum, melatonin enhanced the deacetylation of various SIRT1 substrates,
effects which were largely reversed by the SIRT1 inhibitor sirtinol (

Tajes

et al., 2009

). The melatonin-induced deacetylation of SIRT1 substrates

indicates that mitochondrial biogenesis might be stimulated by the
methoyindole in vivo. Indeed, chronic melatonin administration in-
creases the number and size of mitochondria in the pineal and in epen-
dymal epithelium of the choroid plexus (

Barratt et al., 1977; Decker and

Quay, 1982

).

Melatonin and mitochondrial dysfunction in AD

Several recent studies have supported the involvement of mito-

chondrial ROS and RNS production and abnormal mitochondrial func-
tion in the pathophysiology of AD (

Bobba et al., 2010; Galindo et al.,

2010; Manczak et al., 2010; Massaad et al., 2009; Muller et al., 2010;
Santos et al., 2010; Trancikova et al., in press

). AD is characterized by

extracellular senile plaques of aggregated

β-amyloid (Aβ) and intra-

cellular neuro

fibrillary tangles that contain hyperphosphorylated tau

325

D.P. Cardinali et al. / Hormones and Behavior 63 (2013) 322

–330

protein. The resulting clinical effect is a progressive loss of memory and
deterioration of cognition.

A

β is reported to accumulate in subcellular compartments and to

impair neuronal function (

Reddy et al., 2010

). There is substantial ev-

idence to prove that mitochondrial toxicity is linked to the progres-
sive accumulation of mitochondrial A

β (

Chen and Yan, 2010

). In the

early phase of AD inhibitors of

β and γ-secretase can be therapeuti-

cally effective to halt AD disease progression by inhibition of the A

β

protein misfolding into neurotoxic oligomeric aggregates.

Mitochondrial O

2

•• production plays a critical role in the patholog-

ical events following A

β elevation. An increased expression of mito-

chondrial antioxidant enzyme SOD-2 has been shown to prevent
memory de

ficits and amyloid plaque deposition associated with AD

(

Massaad et al., 2009

). Although a hypothetical occurrence of muta-

tions in mtDNA could cause increased oxidative stress and energy
failure, no causative mutations in mtDNA have been detected in AD
so far.

Several actions of melatonin have been described which antago-

nize the deleterious effects of A

β. The effects of melatonin can be

grouped as (i) antioxidant, including in

fluences on mitochondrial

metabolism; (ii) anti

fibrillogenic, blocking Aβ synthesis; (iii) cyto-

skeletal, including suppression of tau protein hyperphosphorylation.
The anti

fibrillogenic effects of melatonin were observed not only in

vitro but also in vivo in transgenic mouse models (

Feng et al., 2004;

Matsubara et al., 2003; Olcese et al., 2009

).

Protection from A

β toxicity by melatonin was observed, especially

at the mitochondrial level. In a mutant A

β transgenic mouse model of

familial AD melatonin can prevent toxic aggregation of A

β peptide

and, when taken long term, can protect against cognitive de

ficits

(

Olcese et al., 2009

). In a recent study APP/PS1 transgenic mice

were treated for 1 month with melatonin and the analysis of isolated
brain mitochondria indicated that melatonin treatment decreased
mitochondrial A

β levels to 25–50% of controls in several brain regions

(

Dragicevic et al., 2011

). This was accompanied by a near complete

restoration of mitochondrial respiratory rates, membrane potential,
and ATP levels of isolated mitochondria from the hippocampus, cor-
tex, or striatum. In APP-expressing neuroblastoma cells in culture, mi-
tochondrial function was restored by melatonin or by its structurally
related compounds AFMK or indole-3-propionic acid. This was par-
tially blocked by melatonin receptor antagonists indicating that mel-
atonin receptor signaling is required for the full effect. The authors
concluded that treatment stimulating melatonin receptor signaling
can be bene

ficial for restoring mitochondrial function in AD

(

Dragicevic et al., 2011

).

Melatonin also activates the survival signal pathways. One such

pathway is the Bcl-2 pathway, which stabilizes mitochondrial func-
tion by antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family modulators. Bcl-2-expression was
enhanced by melatonin concomitantly with inhibition of A

β-

induced cell death (

Jang et al., 2005

). Melatonin inhibited free radical

formation in microglia exposed to amyloid-

β

1

–42

by preventing the

phosphorylation of the p47 Nox subunit via the PI3K/Akt pathway
(

Zhou et al., 2008

).

In view of the consequences of excitation-dependent Ca

2+

over-

load on mitochondrial membrane potential and mPT sensitivity to-
wards excitotoxins like A

β, the actions of melatonin at the level of

this important cellular compartment deserve particular attention.

Fig. 1. Melatonin and mitochondrial physiopathology. The mechanisms involved in ETC failure mainly depend on the generation of ROS and RNS in the mitochondria leading to
oxidative stress and ATP depletion. Respiratory chain-mediated ROS production, partly via cardiolipin (CL) peroxidation, brings about the detachment of cytochrome c from the
inner mitochondrial membrane and changes in mPT that leads to mitochondrial swelling and the release of cytochrome c and other proapoptotic proteins. Apoptosis ensues by
activation of the caspase cascade in the cytoplasm leading to cell death. Melatonin and its metabolites (AFMK, AMK) prevent this cascade by acting at multiple sites at the mito-
chondria. Scavenging of ROS and RNS prevents free radical attack against ETC complexes and mtDNA. Melatonin protects mPT disruption and proapoptotic signal release to the
cytoplasm. Melatonin also increases transcriptional activity of the mtDNA, improving mitochondrial physiology.

326

D.P. Cardinali et al. / Hormones and Behavior 63 (2013) 322

–330

Modulation of mitochondrial Ca

2+

handling has been suggested as

the potential pharmacological target for AD (

Hung et al., 2010

). In a

recent study a possible melatonin prevention of damage induced by
A

β was evaluated in young and senescent hippocampal neurons. Rat

hippocampal neurons were incubated with A

β

25

–35

and cell viability,

mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP and the activity of the respi-
ratory chain complexes were measured (

Dong et al., 2010

). Cells ex-

posed to A

β

25

–35

showed decreased mitochondrial membrane

potential, inhibited activity of respiratory chain complexes and a de-
pletion of ATP levels. Melatonin attenuated A

β

25

–35

-induced mito-

chondrial damage in senescent hippocampal neurons (

Dong et al.,

2010

). Molecular studies undertaken with mitochondrial prepara-

tions suggest that melatonin has a therapeutic value in treating AD
through its antiapoptotic activities (

Wang et al., 2009

).

As outlined, melatonin acts at different levels relevant to the de-

velopment and manifestation of AD. The antioxidant, mitochondrial
and antiamyloidogenic effects may be seen as a possibility of interfer-
ing with the onset of the disease. Therefore, early beginning of treat-
ment may be decisive (

Quinn et al., 2005

). Mild cognitive impairment

is an etiologically heterogeneous syndrome characterized by cogni-
tive impairment shown by objective measures adjusted for age and
education in advance of dementia (

Gauthier et al., 2006

). Some of

these patients develop AD. A small number of controlled trials indi-
cate that melatonin can be useful to treat mild cognitive impairment
and to prevent progression to AD (

Cardinali et al., 2010

).

Melatonin and mitochondrial dysfunction in PD

PD is a neurodegenerative disorder with a multifactorial etiology,

mainly characterized by the death of dopaminergic neurons in the
substantia nigra pars compacta and by the formation of Lewy bodies.
The initiating factor in PD is still unknown. The possible involvement
of an increased release of free radicals has been entertained in view of
enhanced signs of oxidative stress found in the brain of PD patients
(

Gibson et al., 2010

).

A reduced C-I activity in the substantia nigra pars compacta and

loss of GSH have been reported in PD patients (

Navarro and Boveris,

2010

). The inhibition of ETC proteins compromises energy availability

and leads to apoptosis and death of the dopaminergic cells. Defects in
the mtDNA, a reduced H

+

electrochemical gradient and increased ap-

optosis may underlie speci

fic neuronal death (

Luoma et al., 2004;

Navarro and Boveris, 2010

).

α-Synuclein assembly is a critical step in the development of Lewy

body diseases such as PD and dementia with Lewy bodies. Melatonin
attenuated kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity (

Chang et al., 2011

and

arsenite-induced apoptosis (

Lin et al., 2007

via inhibition

α-synuclein aggregation. Melatonin also decreased the expression of
α-synuclein in dopamine containing neuronal regions after amphetamine
both in vivo (

Sae-Ung et al., 2012

) and in vitro (

Klongpanichapak et al.,

2008

). In a recent study melatonin effectively blocked

α-synuclein fibril

formation and destabilized preformed

fibrils. It also inhibited protofibril

formation, oligomerization, and secondary structure transitions of
α-synuclein as well as reduced α-synuclein cytotoxicity (

Ono et al.,

2011

).

A commonly accepted model of PD is that achieved by the systemic

or intracerebral administration of the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-
1,2,3,6 tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) (

Schober, 2004; Terzioglu and

Galter, 2008

). Its active glial metabolite, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium

(MPP

+

), is taken up into the dopaminergic neurons through the dopa-

mine transporter, and then accumulates in the mitochondria of sub-
stantia nigra. By binding to C-I, MPP

+

increases the production of ROS

and enhances oxidative stress causing reduction of ATP and death of
cells. A neuroprotective effect of melatonin in isolated rat striatal
synaptosomes and liver mitochondria treated with MPTP has been
demonstrated (

Absi et al., 2000

). Melatonin prevented the inhibition

of mitochondrial respiration by limiting the interaction of MPP

+

with C-I of ETC. In a study conducted in adult male mice, MTPT was
administered at a dose of 15 mg/kg in four separate doses (

Tapias

et al., 2009

). The concomitant administration of melatonin or its me-

tabolite AMK (20 mg/kg) signi

ficantly reduced the iNOS activity

stimulated by MPP

+

.

A small number of controlled trials indicate that melatonin is use-

ful to treat disturbed sleep in PD, particularly rapid eye movement-
associated sleep behavior disorder (see for ref.

Srinivasan et al.,

2011a

). Whether melatonin has the potential for treating insomnia

in PD patients and, more generally, for arresting the progression of
PD merits further investigation.

Melatonin and mitochondrial dysfunction in HD

HD is a neurodegenerative disorder that leads to ataxia, chorea

and dementia. It may be produced by a genomic alteration in the
DNA encoding huntingtin, a protein of unknown function but associ-
ated with increased apoptosis. Lesions in HD include predominantly
the

γ-aminobutyric acid containing neurons of the caudate nucleus

(

Schapira, 1999

). Mitochondrial dysfunction occurs in HD (

Chen,

2011

). A mtDNA deletion (mtDNA4977) was found in HD patients

particularly in frontal and temporal lobes but its signi

ficance is un-

known (

Horton et al., 1995

). There are de

ficiencies in the activity of

C-II, C-III and C-IV in caudate and in a lesser extent in putamen in HD.

A Huntington's chorea animal model was developed by using 3-

nitropropionic acid, an inhibitor of mitochondrial C-II. In this model,
that replicates the neurochemical, histological and clinical features
of HD, melatonin administration was reported to defer the clinical
signs of HD (

Tunez et al., 2004

). However, although current evidence

from genetic models of HD including mutation of the huntingtin gene
(mHtt) supports the mitochondrial dysfunction as a major cause of
the disease, impairment of ETC appears to be a late secondary event
(

Oliveira, 2010

). Upstream events include defective mitochondrial

calcium handling and impaired ATP production. Also, transcription
abnormalities affecting mitochondria composition, reduced mito-
chondria traf

ficking to synapses, and direct interference with mito-

chondrial structures enriched in striatal neurons, are possible
mechanisms by which mHtt ampli

fies striatal vulnerability (

Oliveira,

2010

). Evidence is lacking as to whether melatonin's action on mito-

chondria could affect disease's evolution in the genetic model of HD.
At least on the accumulation of insoluble protein aggregates in
intra- and perinuclear inclusions in HD melatonin had little or no in-
hibitory effect on huntingtin aggregation (

Heiser et al., 2000

).

Melatonin and its analogs as pharmaceutical tools

As melatonin exhibits both hypnotic and chronobiotic properties,

it has been therapeutically used for treatment of age-related insom-
nia as well as of other primary and secondary insomnia (

Leger et al.,

2004; Zhdanova et al., 2001

). A recent consensus of the British Asso-

ciation for Psychopharmacology on evidence-based treatment of in-
somnia, parasomnia and circadian rhythm sleep disorders concluded
that melatonin is the

first choice treatment when a hypnotic is indicated

in patients over 55 years (

Wilson et al., 2010

). Since melatonin has a

short half life (less than 30 min) its ef

ficacy in promoting and maintain-

ing sleep has not been uniform in the studies undertaken so far. Thus
the need for the development of prolonged release preparations of
melatonin or of melatonin agonists with a longer duration of action
on sleep regulatory structures in the brain arose (

Turek and Gillette,

2004

). Slow release forms of melatonin (e.g., Circadin®, a 2 mg-

preparation developed by Neurim, Tel Aviv, Israel, and approved
by the European Medicines Agency in 2007) and the melatonin ana-
logs ramelteon, agomelatine, tasimelteon and TK-301 are examples
of this strategy.

Ramelteon (Rozerem®, Takeda Pharmaceuticals, Kyoto, Japan) is a

melatonergic hypnotic analog approved by the FDA for treatment of

327

D.P. Cardinali et al. / Hormones and Behavior 63 (2013) 322

–330

insomnia in 2005. It is a selective agonist for MT

1

/MT

2

receptors with-

out signi

ficant affinity for other receptor sites (

Kato et al., 2005;

Miyamoto, 2009

). In vitro binding studies have shown that ramelteon

af

finity for MT

1

and MT

2

receptors is 3

–16 times higher than that of

melatonin. Doses of ramelteon vary from 8 to 32 mg/day.

Agomelatine (Valdoxan®, Servier, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France) is a

recently introduced melatonergic antidepressant that acts on both
MT

1

and MT

2

melatonergic receptors with a similar af

finity to that

of melatonin; it also acts as an antagonist to serotonin

2C

receptors

at a 3 orders of magnitude greater concentration (

Millan et al.,

2003

). Agomelatine has been licensed by EMEA for treatment of

major depressive disorder at doses of 25

–50 mg/day.

Tasimelteon, [VES-162] is a MT

1

/MT

2

agonist developed by Vanda

Pharmaceuticals, Washington DC, USA, that completed phase III trial
in 2010. In animal studies, tasimelteon exhibited the circadian
phase shifting properties of melatonin (

Vachharajani et al., 2003

). In

clinical studies involving healthy human subjects, tasimelteon was
administered at doses of 10 to 100 mg/day (

Rajaratnam et al.,

2009

). The FDA granted tasimelteon orphan drug designation status

for blind individuals without light perception with non-24-hour
sleep

–wake disorder in 2010.

TIK-301 (formerly LY-156,735) has been in a phase II clinical trial

in the USA since 2002. Originally it was developed by Eli Lilly and
Company, Indianapolis, USA, and called LY-156,735. In 2007 Tikvah
Pharmaceuticals, Atlanta, USA, took over the development and
named it TIK-301. It is a chlorinated derivative of melatonin with
MT

1

/MT

2

agonist activity and 5HT

2C

antagonist activity. TIK-301

pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety have been exam-
ined in a placebo controlled study using 20 to 100 mg/day doses in
healthy volunteers (

Mulchahey et al., 2004

). The FDA granted TIK-

301 orphan drug designation in 2004, to use as a treatment for circa-
dian rhythm sleep disorder in blind individuals without light percep-
tion and individuals with tardive dyskinesia.

As shown by the binding af

finities, half-life and relative potencies

of the different melatonin agonists it is clear that studies using
2

–5 mg melatonin/day are unsuitable to give appropriate comparison

with the effect of the above mentioned compounds, which in addition
to being generally more potent than the native molecule are
employed in considerably higher amounts (

Cardinali et al., in press

).

Melatonin has a high safety pro

file and it is usually remarkably well

tolerated. In some studies melatonin has been administered to pa-
tients at large doses. Melatonin (300 mg/day) given for up to
3 years decreased oxidative stress in patients with amyotrophic later-
al sclerosis (

Weishaupt et al., 2006

). In children with muscular dys-

trophy, 70 mg/day of melatonin reduced cytokines and lipid
peroxidation (

Chahbouni et al., 2010

). Doses of 80 mg melatonin

hourly for 4 h were given to healthy men with no undesirable effects
other than drowsiness (

Waldhauser et al., 1984

). In healthy women

given 300 mg melatonin/day for 4 months there were no side effects
(

Voordouw et al., 1992

). Therefore, further studies employing mela-

tonin doses in the 100 mg/day are needed to clarify its potential ther-
apeutical implications in humans. From animal studies it is clear that
a number of preventive effects of melatonin, like those in neurode-
generative disorders, need high doses of melatonin to become appar-
ent (

Cardinali et al., 2010; Srinivasan et al., 2011a, b

). If one expects

melatonin to be an effective neuroprotector, especially in aged peo-
ple, it is likely that the low doses of melatonin employed so far are
not very bene

ficial.

Conclusions

Abnormal mitochondrial function, decreased respiratory enzyme

complex activities, increased electron leakage and mPT, and increased
Ca

2+

entry have all been shown to play a role in the pathophysiology

of neurodegenerative disorders. In various neurodegenerative dis-
eases, such as AD, PD or HD, mitochondrial changes are not only

observed at the level of ETC dysfunction, electron leakage and oxida-
tive, nitrosative or nitrative damage, but also in a disturbed balance
between mitochondrial fusion and

fission, with consequences for in-

tracellular distribution of these organelles (

Wang et al., 2009

). In

the course of disease progression, mitochondrial density decreases
preferentially in the cell periphery of neurons. The peripheral mito-
chondrial depletion is associated with reduced H

+

electrochemical

gradient and ATP production, increases in radical formation and
losses of spines at neurites (

Wang et al., 2008; Wang et al., 2009

).

This key role of mitochondria in neurodegenerative diseases indi-

cates that supporting the integrity and functioning of these organelles
should be given a high priority, thereby reducing electron leakage and
radical formation. To what extent this is possible with melatonin, per-
haps, in conjunction with photic stimulation of the circadian oscilla-
tors remains to be thoroughly studied.

Acknowledgments

Studies in authors' laboratories were supported by grants from the

Agencia Nacional de Promoción Cientí

fica y Tecnológica, Argentina

and the University of Buenos Aires. DPC is a Research Career Awardee
from the Argentine Research Council (CONICET) and Professor Emer-
itus, University of Buenos Aires. ESP and PS are Research Career
Awardees from CONICET.

References

Absi, E., Ayala, A., Machado, A., Parrado, J., 2000. Protective effect of melatonin against

the 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium-induced inhibition of complex I of the mito-
chondrial respiratory chain. J. Pineal Res. 29, 40

–47.

Acuña Castroviejo, D., López, L.C., Escames, G., López, A., García, J.A., Reiter, R.J., 2011.

Melatonin-mitochondria interplay in health and disease. Curr. Top. Med. Chem.
11, 221

–240.

Ahn, B.H., Kim, H.S., Song, S., Lee, I.H., Liu, J., Vassilopoulos, A., Deng, C.X., Finkel, T.,

2008. A role for the mitochondrial deacetylase Sirt3 in regulating energy homeo-
stasis. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 105, 14447

–14452.

Andrabi, S.A., Sayeed, I., Siemen, D., Wolf, G., Horn, T.F., 2004. Direct inhibition of the

mitochondrial permeability transition pore: a possible mechanism responsible
for anti-apoptotic effects of melatonin. FASEB J. 18, 869

–871.

Antolin, I., Rodríguez, C., Sainz, R.M., Mayo, J.C., Uria, H., Kotler, M.L., Rodríguez-

Colunga, M.J., Tolivia, D., Menéndez-Pelaez, A., 1996. Neurohormone melatonin
prevents cell damage: effect on gene expression for antioxidant enzymes. FASEB
J. 10, 882

–890.

Barratt, G.F., Nadakavukaren, M.J., Frehn, J.L., 1977. Effect of melatonin implants on go-

nadal weights and pineal gland

fine structure of the golden hamster. Tissue Cell 9,

335

–345.

Beal, M.F., 2009. Therapeutic approaches to mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson's

disease. Parkinsonism Relat. Disord. 15 (Suppl. 3), S189

–S194.

Benitez-King, G., 2006. Melatonin as a cytoskeletal modulator: implications for cell

physiology and disease. J. Pineal Res. 40, 1

–9.

Bobba, A., Petragallo, V.A., Marra, E., Atlante, A., 2010. Alzheimer's proteins, oxidative

stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction interplay in a neuronal model of Alzheimer's
disease. Int. J. Alzheimers Dis. doi:

10.4061/2010/621870

(Article ID 621870).

Bonilla, E., Tanji, K., Hirano, M., Vu, T.H., DiMauro, S., Schon, E.A., 1999. Mitochondrial

involvement in Alzheimer's disease. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1410, 171

–182.

Brand, M.D., Nicholls, D.G., 2011. Assessing mitochondrial dysfunction in cells. Bio-

chem. J. 435, 297

–312.

Cardinali, D.P., Lynch, H.J., Wurtman, R.J., 1972. Binding of melatonin to human and rat

plasma proteins. Endocrinology 91, 1213

–1218.

Cardinali, D.P., Furio, A.M., Brusco, L.I., 2010. Clinical aspects of melatonin intervention

in Alzheimer's disease progression. Curr. Neuropharmacol. 8, 218

–227.

Cardinali, D. P., Srinivasan, V., Brzezinski, A., Brown, G. M., in press. Melatonin and its

analogs in insomnia and depression. J. Pineal Res., Doi:

10.1111/j.1600-079X.

2011.00962.x

.

Carrillo-Vico, A., Reiter, R.J., Lardone, P.J., Herrera, J.L., Fernandez-Montesinos, R.,

Guerrero, J.M., Pozo, D., 2006. The modulatory role of melatonin on immune re-
sponsiveness. Curr. Opin. Investig. Drugs 7, 423

–431.

Ceraulo, L., Ferrugia, M., Tesoriere, L., Segreto, S., Livrea, M.A., Turco, L.V., 1999. Interac-

tions of melatonin with membrane models: portioning of melatonin in AOT and
lecithin reversed micelles. J. Pineal Res. 26, 108

–112.

Chahbouni, M., Escames, G., Venegas, C., Sevilla, B., García, J.A., López, L.C., Muñoz-

Hoyos, A., Molina-Carballo, A., Acuña-Castroviejo, D., 2010. Melatonin treatment
normalizes plasma pro-in

flammatory cytokines and nitrosative/oxidative stress

in patients suffering from Duchenne muscular dystrophy. J. Pineal Res. 48,
282

–289.

Chang, H.M., Wu, U.I., Lan, C.T., 2009. Melatonin preserves longevity protein (sirtuin 1)

expression in the hippocampus of total sleep-deprived rats. J. Pineal Res. 47,
211

–220.

328

D.P. Cardinali et al. / Hormones and Behavior 63 (2013) 322

–330

Chang, C.F., Huang, H.J., Lee, H.C., Hung, K.C., Wu, R.T., Lin, A.M., 2011. Melatonin atten-

uates kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity in mouse hippocampus via inhibition of
autophagy and alpha-synuclein aggregation. J. Pineal Res. doi:

10.1111/j.1600-

079X.2011.00945.x

[Epub ahead of print].

Chen, C.M., 2011. Mitochondrial dysfunction, metabolic de

ficits, and increased oxida-

tive stress in Huntington's disease. Chang Gung Med. J. 34, 135

–152.

Chen, J.X., Yan, S.S., 2010. Role of mitochondrial amyloid-beta in Alzheimer's disease. J.

Alzheimers Dis. 20 (Suppl. 2), S569

–S578.

Claustrat, B., Brun, J., Chazot, G., 2005. The basic physiology and pathophysiology of

melatonin. Sleep Med. Rev. 9, 11

–24.

Cuzzocrea, S., Costantino, G., Caputi, A.P., 1998. Protective effect of melatonin on cellu-

lar energy depletion mediated by peroxynitrite and poly (ADP-ribose) synthetase
activation in a non-septic shock model induced by zymosan in the rat. J. Pineal
Res. 25, 78

–85.

Decker, J.F., Quay, W.B., 1982. Stimulatory effects of melatonin on ependymal epitheli-

um of choroid plexuses in golden hamsters. J. Neural Transm. 55, 53

–67.

DiMauro, S., Schon, E.A., 2008. Mitochondrial disorders in the nervous system. Annu.

Rev. Neurosci. 31, 91

–123.

Dong, W., Huang, F., Fan, W., Cheng, S., Chen, Y., Zhang, W., Shi, H., He, H., 2010. Differential

effects of melatonin on amyloid-beta peptide 25

–35-induced mitochondrial dysfunc-

tion in hippocampal neurons at different stages of culture. J. Pineal Res. 48, 117

–125.

Dragicevic, N., Copes, N., O'Neal-Mof

fitt, G., Jin, J., Buzzeo, R., Mamcarz, M., Tan, J., Cao,

C., Olcese, J.M., Arendash, G.W., Bradshaw, P.C., 2011. Melatonin treatment restores
mitochondrial function in Alzheimer's mice: a mitochondrial protective role of
melatonin membrane receptor signaling. J. Pineal Res. 51, 75

–86.

Dubocovich, M.L., Delagrange, P., Krause, D.N., Sugden, D., Cardinali, D.P., Olcese, J.,

2010. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXV. Nomencla-
ture, classi

fication, and pharmacology of G protein-coupled melatonin receptors.

Pharmacol. Rev. 62, 343

–380.

Esposito, E., Cuzzocrea, S., 2010. Antiin

flammatory activity of melatonin in central ner-

vous system. Curr. Neuropharmacol. 8, 228

–242.

Facciola, G., Hidestrand, M., von Bahr, C., Tybring, G., 2001. Cytochrome P450 isoforms

involved in melatonin metabolism in human liver microsomes. Eur. J. Clin. Phar-
macol. 56, 881

–888.

Feng, Z., Chang, Y., Cheng, Y., Zhang, B.L., Qu, Z.W., Qin, C., Zhang, J.T., 2004. Melatonin

alleviates behavioral de

ficits associated with apoptosis and cholinergic system

dysfunction in the APP 695 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. J. Pine-
al Res. 37, 129

–136.

Galano, A., Tan, D.X., Reiter, R.J., 2011. Melatonin as a natural ally against oxidative

stress: a physicochemical examination. J. Pineal Res. 51, 1

–16.

Galindo, M.F., Ikuta, I., Zhu, X., Casadesus, G., Jordan, J., 2010. Mitochondrial biology in

Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. J. Neurochem. 114, 933

–945.

Gauthier, S., Reisberg, B., Zaudig, M., Petersen, R.C., Ritchie, K., Broich, K., Belleville, S.,

Brodaty, H., Bennett, D., Chertkow, H., Cummings, J.L., de Leon, M., Feldman, H.,
Ganguli, M., Hampel, H., Scheltens, P., Tierney, M.C., Whitehouse, P., Winblad, B.,
2006. Mild cognitive impairment. Lancet 367, 1262

–1270.

Genova, M.L., Pich, M.M., Bernacchia, A., Bianchi, C., Biondi, A., Bovina, C., Falasca, A.I.,

Formiggini, G., Castelli, G.P., Lenaz, G., 2004. The mitochondrial production of reac-
tive oxygen species in relation to aging and pathology. Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. 1011,
86

–100.

Gibson, G.E., Starkov, A., Blass, J.P., Ratan, R.R., Beal, M.F., 2010. Cause and consequence:

mitochondrial dysfunction initiates and propagates neuronal dysfunction, neuro-
nal death and behavioral abnormalities in age-associated neurodegenerative dis-
eases. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1802, 122

–134.

Gleichmann, M., Mattson, M.P., 2011. Neuronal calcium homeostasis and dysregula-

tion. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1261

–1273.

Guarente, L., 2008. Mitochondria

—a nexus for aging, calorie restriction, and sirtuins?

Cell 132, 171

–176.

Gutierrez-Cuesta, J., Tajes, M., Jimenez, A., Coto-Montes, A., Camins, A., Pallas, M., 2008.

Evaluation of potential pro-survival pathways regulated by melatonin in a murine
senescence model. J. Pineal Res. 45, 497

–505.

Hardeland, R., 2005. Antioxidative protection by melatonin: multiplicity of mecha-

nisms from radical detoxi

fication to radical avoidance. Endocrine 27, 119–130.

Hardeland, R., 2009. Melatonin: signaling mechanisms of a pleiotropic agent. Biofactors

35, 183

–192.

Hardeland, R., Pandi-Perumal, S.R., 2005. Melatonin, a potent agent in antioxidative de-

fense: actions as a natural food constituent, gastrointestinal factor, drug and pro-
drug. Nutr. Metab. (Lond.) 2, 22.

Hardeland, R., Coto-Montes, A., Poeggeler, B., 2003. Circadian rhythms, oxidative stress,

and antioxidative defense mechanisms. Chronobiol. Int. 20, 921

–962.

Hardeland, R., Tan, D.X., Reiter, R.J., 2009. Kynuramines, metabolites of melatonin and

other indoles: the resurrection of an almost forgotten class of biogenic amines. J.
Pineal Res. 47, 109

–116.

Hardeland, R., Cardinali, D.P., Srinivasan, V., Spence, D.W., Brown, G.M., Pandi-Perumal,

S.R., 2011. Melatonin

—a pleiotropic, orchestrating regulator molecule. Prog. Neu-

robiol. 93, 350

–384.

Hartter, S., Ursing, C., Morita, S., Tybring, G., von Bahr, C., Christensen, M., Rojdmark, S.,

Bertilsson, L., 2001. Orally given melatonin may serve as a probe drug for cyto-
chrome P450 1A2 activity in vivo: a pilot study. Clin. Pharmacol. Ther. 70, 10

–16.

Heiser, V., Scherzinger, E., Boeddrich, A., Nordhoff, E., Lurz, R., Schugardt, N., Lehrach,

H., Wanker, E.E., 2000. Inhibition of huntingtin

fibrillogenesis by specific anti-

bodies and small molecules: implications for Huntington's disease therapy. Proc.
Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 97, 6739

–6744.

Horton, T.M., Graham, B.H., Corral-Debrinski, M., Shoffner, J.M., Kaufman, A.E., Beal,

M.F., Wallace, D.C., 1995. Marked increase in mitochondrial DNA deletion levels
in the cerebral cortex of Huntington's disease patients. Neurology 45, 1879

–1883.

Hung, C.H., Ho, Y.S., Chang, R.C., 2010. Modulation of mitochondrial calcium as a phar-

macological target for Alzheimer's disease. Ageing Res. Rev. 9, 447

–456.

Jang, M.H., Jung, S.B., Lee, M.H., Kim, C.J., Oh, Y.T., Kang, I., Kim, J., Kim, E.H., 2005. Mel-

atonin attenuates amyloid beta25

–35-induced apoptosis in mouse microglial BV2

cells. Neurosci. Lett. 380, 26

–31.

Jimenez-Ortega, V., Cano, P., Cardinali, D.P., Esqui

fino, A.I., 2009. 24-Hour variation in

gene expression of redox pathway enzymes in rat hypothalamus: effect of melato-
nin treatment. Redox Rep. 14, 132

–138.

Jou, M.J., Peng, T.I., Reiter, R.J., Jou, S.B., Wu, H.Y., Wen, S.T., 2004. Visualization of the

antioxidative effects of melatonin at the mitochondrial level during oxidative
stress-induced apoptosis of rat brain astrocytes. J. Pineal Res. 37, 55

–70.

Jou, M.J., Peng, T.I., Yu, P.Z., Jou, S.B., Reiter, R.J., Chen, J.Y., Wu, H.Y., Chen, C.C., Hsu, L.F.,

2007. Melatonin protects against common deletion of mitochondrial DNA-
augmented mitochondrial oxidative stress and apoptosis. J. Pineal Res. 43,
389

–403.

Karbownik, M., Tan, D., Manchester, L.C., Reiter, R.J., 2000. Renal toxicity of the carcin-

ogen delta-aminolevulinic acid: antioxidant effects of melatonin. Cancer Lett. 161,
1

–7.

Kato, K., Hirai, K., Nishiyama, K., Uchikawa, O., Fukatsu, K., Ohkawa, S., Kawamata, Y.,

Hinuma, S., Miyamoto, M., 2005. Neurochemical properties of ramelteon (TAK-
375), a selective MT

1

/MT

2

receptor agonist. Neuropharmacology 48, 301

–310.

Klongpanichapak, S., Phansuwan-Pujito, P., Ebadi, M., Govitrapong, P., 2008. Melatonin

inhibits amphetamine-induced increase in alpha-synuclein and decrease in phos-
phorylated tyrosine hydroxylase in SK-N-SH cells. Neurosci. Lett. 436, 309

–313.

Leger, D., Laudon, M., Zisapel, N., 2004. Nocturnal 6-sulfatoxymelatonin excretion in in-

somnia and its relation to the response to melatonin replacement therapy. Am. J.
Med. 116, 91

–95.

Lemasters, J.J., Theruvath, T.P., Zhong, Z., Nieminen, A.L., 2009. Mitochondrial calcium

and the permeability transition in cell death. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1787,
1395

–1401.

Lenaz, G., Genova, M.L., 2010. Structure and organization of mitochondrial respiratory

complexes: a new understanding of an old subject. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 12,
961

–1008.

Lin, A.M., Fang, S.F., Chao, P.L., Yang, C.H., 2007. Melatonin attenuates arsenite-induced

apoptosis in rat brain: involvement of mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum
pathways and aggregation of alpha-synuclein. J. Pineal Res. 43, 163

–171.

Liochev, S.I., Fridovich, I., 2010. Mechanism of the peroxidase activity of Cu, Zn super-

oxide dismutase. Free Radic. Biol. Med. 48, 1565

–1569.

Lombard, D.B., Alt, F.W., Cheng, H.L., Bunkenborg, J., Streeper, R.S., Mostoslavsky, R.,

Kim, J., Yancopoulos, G., Valenzuela, D., Murphy, A., Yang, Y., Chen, Y., Hirschey,
M.D., Bronson, R.T., Haigis, M., Guarente, L.P., Farese Jr., R.V., Weissman, S.,
Verdin, E., Schwer, B., 2007. Mammalian Sir2 homolog SIRT3 regulates global mito-
chondrial lysine acetylation. Mol. Cell. Biol. 27, 8807

–8814.

López, A., García, J.A., Escames, G., Venegas, C., Ortiz, F., López, L.C., Acuña-Castroviejo,

D., 2009. Melatonin protects the mitochondria from oxidative damage reducing
oxygen consumption, membrane potential, and superoxide anion production. J. Pi-
neal Res. 46, 188

–198.

Luoma, P., Melberg, A., Rinne, J.O., Kaukonen, J.A., Nupponen, N.N., Chalmers, R.M.,

Oldfors, A., Rautakorpi, I., Peltonen, L., Majamaa, K., Somer, H., Suomalainen, A.,
2004. Parkinsonism, premature menopause, and mitochondrial DNA polymerase
gamma mutations: clinical and molecular genetic study. Lancet 364, 875

–882.

Manczak, M., Mao, P., Calkins, M.J., Cornea, A., Reddy, A.P., Murphy, M.P., Szeto, H.H.,

Park, B., Reddy, P.H., 2010. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidants protect against
amyloid-beta toxicity in Alzheimer's disease neurons. J. Alzheimers Dis. 20
(Suppl. 2), S609

–S631.

Mander, P., Brown, G.C., 2004. Nitric oxide, hypoxia and brain in

flammation. Biochem.

Soc. Trans. 32, 1068

–1069.

Martin, M., Macias, M., Escames, G., Leon, J., Acuña-Castroviejo, D., 2000a. Melatonin

but not vitamins C and E maintains glutathione homeostasis in t-butyl
hydroperoxide-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress. FASEB J. 14, 1677

–1679.

Martin, M., Macias, M., Escames, G., Reiter, R.J., Agapito, M.T., Ortiz, G.G., Acuña-

Castroviejo, D., 2000b. Melatonin-induced increased activity of the respiratory
chain complexes I and IV can prevent mitochondrial damage induced by rutheni-
um red in vivo. J. Pineal Res. 28, 242

–248.

Massaad, C.A., Pautler, R.G., Klann, E., 2009. Mitochondrial superoxide: a key player in

Alzheimer's disease. Aging (Albany NY) 1, 758

–761.

Mathes, A., Kubuls, D., Waibel, L., Weiler, J., Heymann, P., Wolf, B., Rensing, H., 2008. Se-

lective activation of melatonin receptors with ramelteon improves liver function
and hepatic perfusion after hemorrhagic shock in rat. Crit. Care Med. 36,
2863

–2870.

Matsubara, E., Bryant-Thomas, T., Pacheco, Q.J., Henry, T.L., Poeggeler, B., Herbert, D.,

Cruz-Sanchez, F., Chyan, Y.J., Smith, M.A., Perry, G., Shoji, M., Abe, K., Leone, A.,
Grundke-Ikbal, I., Wilson, G.L., Ghiso, J., Williams, C., Refolo, L.M., Pappolla, M.A.,
Chain, D.G., Neria, E., 2003. Melatonin increases survival and inhibits oxidative
and amyloid pathology in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease. J. Neurochem.
85, 1101

–1108.

Messner, M., Hardeland, R., Rodenbeck, A., Huether, G., 1998. Tissue retention and sub-

cellular distribution of continuously infused melatonin in rats under near physio-
logical conditions. J. Pineal Res. 25, 251

–259.

Millan, M.J., Gobert, A., Lejeune, F., Dekeyne, A., Newman-Tancredi, A., Pasteau, V.,

Rivet, J.M., Cussac, D., 2003. The novel melatonin agonist agomelatine (S20098)
is an antagonist at 5-hydroxytryptamine

2C

receptors, blockade of which enhances

the activity of frontocortical dopaminergic and adrenergic pathways. J. Pharmacol.
Exp. Ther. 306, 954

–964.

Miyamoto, M., 2009. Pharmacology of ramelteon, a selective MT

1

/MT

2

receptor ago-

nist: a novel therapeutic drug for sleep disorders. CNS Neurosci. Ther. 15, 32

–51.

329

D.P. Cardinali et al. / Hormones and Behavior 63 (2013) 322

–330

Mulchahey, J.J., Goldwater, D.R., Zemlan, F.P., 2004. A single blind, placebo controlled,

across groups dose escalation study of the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics
and pharmacodynamics of the melatonin analog beta-methyl-6-chloromelatonin.
Life Sci. 75, 1843

–1856.

Muller, W.E., Eckert, A., Kurz, C., Eckert, G.P., Leuner, K., 2010. Mitochondrial dysfunc-

tion: common

final pathway in brain aging and Alzheimer's disease—therapeutic

aspects. Mol. Neurobiol. 41, 159

–171.

Navarro, A., Boveris, A., 2010. Brain mitochondrial dysfunction in aging, neurodegen-

eration, and Parkinson's disease. Front. Aging Neurosci . 2 (Sep 1; pii: 3).

Olcese, J.M., Cao, C., Mori, T., Mamcarz, M.B., Maxwell, A., Runfeldt, M.J., Wang, L.,

Zhang, C., Lin, X., Zhang, G., Arendash, G.W., 2009. Protection against cognitive def-
icits and markers of neurodegeneration by long-term oral administration of mela-
tonin in a transgenic model of Alzheimer disease. J. Pineal Res. 47, 82

–96.

Oliveira, J.M., 2010. Nature and cause of mitochondrial dysfunction in Huntington's dis-

ease: focusing on huntingtin and the striatum. J. Neurochem. 114, 1

–12.

Oliveira, J.M., 2011. Techniques to investigate neuronal mitochondrial function and its

pharmacological modulation. Curr. Drug Targets 12, 762

–773.

Ono, K., Mochizuki, H., Ikeda, T., Nihira, T., Takasaki, J.I., Teplow, D.B., Yamada, M., 2011.

Effect of melatonin on alpha-synuclein self-assembly and cytotoxicity. Neurobiol.
Aging doi:

10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2011.10.015

[Epub ahead of print].

Pablos, M.I., Reiter, R.J., Ortiz, G.G., Guerrero, J.M., Agapito, M.T., Chuang, J.I., Sewerynek,

E., 1998. Rhythms of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in brain of
chick and their inhibition by light. Neurochem. Int. 32, 69

–75.

Paradies, G., Petrosillo, G., Paradies, V., Reiter, R.J., Ruggiero, F.M., 2010. Melatonin, cardio-

lipin and mitochondrial bioenergetics in health and disease. J. Pineal Res. 48, 297

–310.

Petrosillo, G., Fattoretti, P., Matera, M., Ruggiero, F.M., Bertoni-Freddari, C., Paradies, G.,

2008. Melatonin prevents age-related mitochondrial dysfunction in rat brain via
cardiolipin protection. Rejuvenation Res. 11, 935

–943.

Pivovarova, N.B., Andrews, S.B., 2010. Calcium-dependent mitochondrial function and

dysfunction in neurons. FEBS J. 277, 3622

–3636.

Quinn, J., Kulhanek, D., Nowlin, J., Jones, R., Pratico, D., Rokach, J., Stackman, R., 2005.

Chronic melatonin therapy fails to alter amyloid burden or oxidative damage in
old Tg2576 mice: implications for clinical trials. Brain Res. 1037, 209

–213.

Raha, S., Robinson, B.H., 2000. Mitochondria, oxygen free radicals, disease and ageing.

Trends Biochem. Sci. 25, 502

–508.

Rajaratnam, S.M., Polymeropoulos, M.H., Fisher, D.M., Roth, T., Scott, C., Birznieks, G.,

Klerman, E.B., 2009. Melatonin agonist tasimelteon (VEC-162) for transient insom-
nia after sleep-time shift: two randomised controlled multicentre trials. Lancet
373, 482

–491.

Reddy, P.H., Manczak, M., Mao, P., Calkins, M.J., Reddy, A.P., Shirendeb, U., 2010. Amy-

loid-beta and mitochondria in aging and Alzheimer's disease: implications for syn-
aptic damage and cognitive decline. J. Alzheimers Dis. 20 (Suppl. 2), S499

–S512.

Reiter, R.J., Paredes, S.D., Manchester, L.C., Tan, D.X., 2009. Reducing oxidative/nitrosa-

tive stress: a newly-discovered genre for melatonin. Crit. Rev. Biochem. Mol. Biol.
44, 175

–200.

Reyes Toso, C.F., Rebagliati, I.R., Ricci, C., Linares, L.M., Albornoz, L.E., Cardinali, D.P.,

Zaninovich, A.A., 2006. Effect of melatonin treatment on oxygen consumption by
rat liver mitochondria. Amino Acids 31, 299

–302.

Rezin, G.T., Amboni, G., Zugno, A.I., Quevedo, J., Streck, E.L., 2009. Mitochondrial dys-

function and psychiatric disorders. Neurochem. Res. 34, 1021

–1029.

Rodriguez, C., Mayo, J.C., Sainz, R.M., Antolin, I., Herrera, F., Martin, V., Reiter, R.J., 2004.

Regulation of antioxidant enzymes: a signi

ficant role for melatonin. J. Pineal Res.

36, 1

–9.

Rollins, B., Martin, M.V., Sequeira, P.A., Moon, E.A., Morgan, L.Z., Watson, S.J.,

Schatzberg, A., Akil, H., Myers, R.M., Jones, E.G., Wallace, D.C., Bunney, W.E.,
Vawter, M.P., 2009. Mitochondrial variants in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder,
and major depressive disorder. PLoS One 4, e4913.

Sae-Ung, K., Ueda, K., Govitrapong, P., Phansuwan-Pujito, P., 2012. Melatonin reduces

the expression of alpha-synuclein in the dopamine containing neuronal regions
of amphetamine-treated postnatal rats. J. Pineal Res. 52, 128

–137.

Sainz, R.M., Mayo, J.C., Rodriguez, C., Tan, D.X., Lopez-Burillo, S., Reiter, R.J., 2003. Mel-

atonin and cell death: differential actions on apoptosis in normal and cancer cells.
Cell Mol. Life Sci. 60, 1407

–1426.

Santos, R.X., Correia, S.C., Wang, X., Perry, G., Smith, M.A., Moreira, P.I., Zhu, X., 2010.

Alzheimer's disease: diverse aspects of mitochondrial malfunctioning. Int. J. Clin.
Exp. Pathol. 3, 570

–581.

Santucci, R., Sinibaldi, F., Patriarca, A., Santucci, D., Fiorucci, L., 2010. Misfolded proteins

and neurodegeneration: role of non-native cytochrome c in cell death. Expert Rev.
Proteomics 7, 507

–517.

Schapira, A.H., 1999. Mitochondrial involvement in Parkinson's disease, Huntington's

disease, hereditary spastic paraplegia and Friedreich's ataxia. Biochim. Biophys.
Acta 1410, 159

–170.

Schober, A., 2004. Classic toxin-induced animal models of Parkinson's disease: 6-OHDA

and MPTP. Cell Tissue Res. 318, 215

–224.

Schon, E.A., DiMauro, S., Hirano, M., Gilkerson, R.W., 2010. Therapeutic prospects for

mitochondrial disease. Trends Mol. Med. 16, 268

–276.

Srinivasan, V., Cardinali, D.P., Srinivasan, U.S., Kaur, C., Brown, G.M., Spence, D.W.,

Hardeland, R., Pandi-Perumal, S.R., 2011a. Therapeutic potential of melatonin and
its analogs in Parkinson's disease: focus on sleep and neuroprotection. Ther. Adv.
Neurol. Disord. 4, 297

–317.

Srinivasan, V., Kaur, C., Pandi-Perumal, S.R., Brown, G.M., Cardinali, D.P., 2011b. Melato-

nin and its agonist ramelteon in Alzheimer's disease: possible therapeutic value.
Int. J. Alzheimers Dis. 2011, 1

–15 doi:

10.4061/2011/741974

.

Srinivasan, V., Spence, D.W., Pandi-Perumal, S.R., Brown, G.M., Cardinali, D.P., 2011c.

Melatonin in mitochondrial dysfunction and related disorders. Int. J. Alzheimers
Dis. 2011, 1

–15 doi:

10.4061/2011/326320

.

Stadtman, E.R., Levine, R.L., 2003. Free radical-mediated oxidation of free amino acids

and amino acid residues in proteins. Amino Acids 25, 207

–218.

Tajes, M., Gutierrez-Cuesta, J., Ortuno-Sahagun, D., Camins, A., Pallas, M., 2009. Anti-

aging properties of melatonin in an in vitro murine senescence model: involve-
ment of the sirtuin 1 pathway. J. Pineal Res. 47, 228

–237.

Tan, D., Reiter, R.J., Chen, L.D., Poeggeler, B., Manchester, L.C., Barlow-Walden, L.R.,

1994. Both physiological and pharmacological levels of melatonin reduce DNA ad-
duct formation induced by the carcinogen safrole. Carcinogenesis 15, 215

–218.

Tan, D.X., Manchester, L.C., Terron, M.P., Flores, L.J., Reiter, R.J., 2007. One molecule,

many derivatives: a never-ending interaction of melatonin with reactive oxygen
and nitrogen species? J. Pineal Res. 42, 28

–42.

Tapias, V., Escames, G., Lopez, L.C., Lopez, A., Camacho, E., Carrion, M.D., Entrena, A.,

Gallo, M.A., Espinosa, A., Acuña-Castroviejo, D., 2009. Melatonin and its brain me-
tabolite N

1

-acetyl-5-methoxykynuramine prevent mitochondrial nitric oxide

synthase induction in parkinsonian mice. J. Neurosci. Res. 87, 3002

–3010.

Terzioglu, M., Galter, D., 2008. Parkinson's disease: genetic versus toxin-induced ro-

dent models. FEBS J. 275, 1384

–1391.

Toman, J., Fiskum, G., 2011. In

fluence of aging on membrane permeability transition in

brain mitochondria. J. Bioenerg. Biomembr. 43, 3

–10.

Trancikova, A., Tsika, E., Moore, D. J., in press. Mitochondrial dysfunction in genetic an-

imal models of Parkinson's disease. Antioxid. Redox. Signal.

Tunez, I., Montilla, P., Del Carmen, M.M., Feijoo, M., Salcedo, M., 2004. Protective effect

of melatonin on 3-nitropropionic acid-induced oxidative stress in synaptosomes in
an animal model of Huntington's disease. J. Pineal Res. 37, 252

–256.

Turek, F.W., Gillette, M.U., 2004. Melatonin, sleep, and circadian rhythms: rationale for

development of speci

fic melatonin agonists. Sleep Med. 5, 523–532.

Urata, Y., Honma, S., Goto, S., Todoroki, S., Iida, T., Cho, S., Honma, K., Kondo, T., 1999.

Melatonin induces gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase mediated by activator
protein-1 in human vascular endothelial cells. Free Radic. Biol. Med. 27, 838

–847.

Vachharajani, N.N., Yeleswaram, K., Boulton, D.W., 2003. Preclinical pharmacokinetics

and metabolism of BMS-214778, a novel melatonin receptor agonist. J. Pharm.
Sci. 92, 760

–772.

Venegas, C., Garcia, J.A., Escames, G., Ortiz, F., Lopez, A., Doerrier, C., Garcia-Corzo, L.,

Lopez, L.C., Reiter, R.J., Acuña-Castroviejo, D., 2012. Extrapineal melatonin: analysis
of its subcellular distribution and daily

fluctuations. J. Pineal Res. 52, 217–227.

Voordouw, B.C., Euser, R., Verdonk, R.E., Alberda, B.T., de Jong, F.H., Drogendijk, A.C.,

Fauser, B.C., Cohen, M., 1992. Melatonin and melatonin-progestin combinations
alter pituitary-ovarian function in women and can inhibit ovulation. J. Clin. Endo-
crinol. Metab. 74, 108

–117.

Waldhauser, F., Waldhauser, M., Lieberman, H.R., Deng, M.H., Lynch, H.J., Wurtman, R.J.,

1984. Bioavailability of oral melatonin in humans. Neuroendocrinology 39, 307

–313.

Wang, X., Su, B., Siedlak, S.L., Moreira, P.I., Fujioka, H., Wang, Y., Casadesus, G., Zhu, X.,

2008. Amyloid-beta overproduction causes abnormal mitochondrial dynamics via
differential modulation of mitochondrial

fission/fusion proteins. Proc. Natl. Acad.

Sci. U. S. A. 105, 19318

–19323.

Wang, X., Su, B., Lee, H.G., Li, X., Perry, G., Smith, M.A., Zhu, X., 2009. Impaired balance of

mitochondrial

fission and fusion in Alzheimer's disease. J. Neurosci. 29, 9090–9103.

Weishaupt, J.H., Bartels, C., Polking, E., Dietrich, J., Rohde, G., Poeggeler, B., Mertens, N.,

Sperling, S., Bohn, M., Huther, G., Schneider, A., Bach, A., Siren, A.L., Hardeland, R.,
Bahr, M., Nave, K.A., Ehrenreich, H., 2006. Reduced oxidative damage in ALS by
high-dose enteral melatonin treatment. J. Pineal Res. 41, 313

–323.

Wilson, S.J., Nutt, D.J., Alford, C., Argyropoulos, S.V., Baldwin, D.S., Bateson, A.N., Britton,

T.C., Crowe, C., Dijk, D.J., Espie, C.A., Gringras, P., Hajak, G., Idzikowski, C., Krystal,
A.D., Nash, J.R., Selsick, H., Sharpley, A.L., Wade, A.G., 2010. British Association for
Psychopharmacology consensus statement on evidence-based treatment of insom-
nia, parasomnias and circadian rhythm disorders. J. Psychopharmacol. 24,
1577

–1601.

Xu, M., Ashraf, M., 2002. Melatonin protection against lethal myocyte injury induced by

doxorubicin as re

flected by effects on mitochondrial membrane potential. J. Mol.

Cell. Cardiol. 34, 75

–79.

Zhdanova, I.V., Wurtman, R.J., Regan, M.M., Taylor, J.A., Shi, J.P., Leclair, O.U., 2001. Mel-

atonin treatment for age-related insomnia. J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. 86,
4727

–4730.

Zhou, J., Zhang, S., Zhao, X., Wei, T., 2008. Melatonin impairs NADPH oxidase assembly

and decreases superoxide anion production in microglia exposed to amyloid-
beta

1

–42

. J. Pineal Res. 45, 157

–165.

330

D.P. Cardinali et al. / Hormones and Behavior 63 (2013) 322

–330