FISCAL PLAN

San Juan, Puerto Rico

February 28

th

, 2017

The Puerto Rico Fiscal Agency and Financial Advisory Authority (“AAFAF”), the Government of Puerto Rico (the “Government”), and each of

their respective officers, directors, employees, agents, attorneys, advisors, members, partners or affiliates (collectively, with AAFAF and the

Government instrumentalities the “Parties”) make no representation or warranty, express or implied, to any third party with respect to the

information contained herein and all Parties expressly disclaim any such representations or warranties. The Government has had to rely upon

preliminary information and unaudited financials for 2015 and 2016, in addition to the inherent complexities that are part of a government in

transition, especially after a prolonged period of public finance obscurity. As such, AAFAF and the Government have made certain

assumptions that may materially change once more clarity and transparency takes hold, especially after the Government issues the past due

audited financials for 2015 and 2016 later this year.

The Parties do not owe or accept any duty or responsibility to any reader or recipient of this presentation, whether in contract or tort, and

shall not be liable for or in respect of any loss, damage (including without limitation consequential damages or lost profits) or expense of

whatsoever nature of such third party that may be caused by, or alleged to be caused by, the use of this presentation or that is otherwise

consequent upon the gaining of access to this document by such third party.

This document does not constitute an audit conducted in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards, an examination of internal

controls or other attestation or review services in accordance with standards established by the American Institute of Certified Public

Accountants or any other organization. Accordingly, the Parties do not express an opinion or any other form of assurance on the financial

statements or any financial or other information or the internal controls of the Government and the information contained herein.

Any statements and assumptions contained in this document, whether forward-looking or historical, are not guarantees of future

performance and involve certain risks, uncertainties, estimates and other assumptions made in this document. The economic and financial

condition of the Government and its instrumentalities is affected by various financial, social, economic, environmental and political factors.

These factors can be very complex, may vary from one fiscal year to the next and are frequently the result of actions taken or not taken, not

only by the Government and its agencies and instrumentalities, but also by entities such as the government of the United States. Because of

the uncertainty and unpredictability of these factors, their impact cannot be included in the assumptions contained in this document. Future

events and actual results may differ materially from any estimates, projections, or statements contained herein. Nothing in this document

should be considered as an express or implied commitment to do or take, or to refrain from taking, any action by AAFAF, the Government, or

any government instrumentality in the Government or an admission of any fact or future event. Nothing in this document shall be considered

a solicitation, recommendation or advice to any person to participate, pursue or support a particular course of action or transaction, to

purchase or sell any security, or to make any investment decision.

By receiving this document, the recipient shall be deemed to have acknowledged and agreed to the terms of these limitations.
This document may contain capitalized terms that are not defined herein, or may contain terms that are discussed in other documents or that

are commonly understood. You should make no assumptions about the meaning of capitalized terms that are not defined, and you should

consult with advisors of AAFAF should clarification be required.

Disclaimer

2

I.

Executive Summary

II.

Background

III.

Financial Projections

IV.

Fiscal Reform Measures

V.

Structural Reforms

VI.

Debt Sustainability Analysis

VII.

Liquidity Discussion

VIII.

Financial Control Reform

IX.

Fiscal Plan Implementation

X.

Legal Compliance with PROMESA

XI.

Appendices  

I.

History and Root Causes of the Crisis

II.

Fiscal Plan Background 

III.

Structural Reforms background and Infrastructure Projects

IV.

PROMESA Basis for Fiscal Plan & Policy / Sense of Congress

Table of Contents

3

I. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

4

Puerto Rico’s fiscal and economic challenges are the result of an extended period of fiscal irresponsibility, ineffective 
leadership, lack of long-term economic planning and frequent changes that: 

i.

closed Puerto Rico’s access to the capital markets

ii.

degraded our credit into junk category for the first time in our history

iii.

exhausted our liquidity

iv.

provided zero visibility on public finances

v.

increased the cost of government 

vi.

left billions in payments owed to private sector businesses

vii.

caused a downward economic spiral, alienating private investment

viii.

afforded no transparency to our citizens and the investment community about its management of taxpayer funds

Following the enactment of the Puerto Rico Oversight Management and Economic Stability Act (“PROMESA”) on June 30, 2016, 
the past administration also had the historic opportunity of preparing a certifiable fiscal plan to help redress the damage 
caused by its own actions

i.

Instead it disregarded its federal statutory obligation to revise such plan in a compliant manner

ii.

The end result was a deficient fiscal plan draft, as recognized by the Oversight Board in its letters of November 23, 2016 
and thereafter, that only delayed Puerto Rico’s path to fiscal recovery  

The past government’s  strategy with investors: confrontational and hostile attitude, lack of transparency (inability to produce
credible financial information / audited financials), and disregard for the rule of law, set Puerto Rico in the wrong course

The new administration took office on January 2, 2017, only 58 days ago. In that time period, the Oversight Board has asked 
that we prepare a ten (10) year fiscal plan to address a $67 billion budget gap over the next 10 years, pension reform and 
achieve the fiscal plan goals necessary to improve the quality of life of our citizens

5

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Puerto Rico’s current situation

Strategic imperatives of the Fiscal Plan

i.

Restoring credibility with all stakeholders through transparent, supportable financial information and honoring our 
obligations in accordance with the Constitution of Puerto Rico 

ii.

Reducing the complexity and inefficiency of government to deliver essential services in a cost-effective manner 

iii.

Implementing reforms to improve Puerto Rico’s competitiveness and reduce the cost of doing business

iv.

Ensuring that economic development processes are effective and aligned to incentive the necessary investments to 
promote economic growth and job creation

v.

Protecting the most vulnerable segments of our society and transforming our public pensions system

vi.

Consensually renegotiating and restructuring debt obligations through Title VI of PROMESA.

vii.

Monitoring liquidity and managing anticipated shortfalls in current forecast; and 

viii.

Achieving fiscal balance by 2019 and maintaining fiscal stability with balanced budgets thereafter (through 2027 and 
beyond) 

The Fiscal Plan achieves its objectives through fiscal reform measures, strategic reform initiatives and financial control reforms:

i.

Fiscal Reform Measures that reduce the 10-year financing gap by $33.3 billion through:

Revenue enhancements through tax reform and compliance enhancement strategies 

Government right-sizing and subsidy reductions  

Efficient delivery of healthcare services 

Pension reform

ii.

Structural Reform Initiatives that provide the tools to significantly increase Puerto Rico’s capacity to grow its economy

Improving ease of business activity

Capital efficiency

Energy Reform

iii.

Financial Control Reforms through improvement of transparency, controls and accountability of budgeting, procurement 
and disbursement processes

6

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Fiscal Plan seeks to achieve fiscal solvency and long term economic growth

The Fiscal Plan complies with the 14 statutory requirements established by PROMESA and the five principles established by 
the Oversight Board (Refer to “Legal Compliance with PROMESA” section)

The Fiscal Plan sets the path to making available to the public and creditor constituents financial information that has been
long overdue 

Upon the Oversight Board’s certification of those fiscal plans it deems to be compliant with PROMESA, the Government and 
its advisors will promptly convene meetings with organized bondholder groups, insurers, union, local interest business 
groups, public advocacy groups and municipality representative leaders to discuss and answer all pertinent questions 
concerning the fiscal plan and to provide additional and necessary momentum as appropriate

the stated intent and preference of the Government is to conduct “good-faith” negotiations with creditors to achieve 
restructuring “voluntary agreements” in the manner and method provided for under the provisions of Title VI of PROMESA

7

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Fiscal Plan provides the first important step in re-establishing the dialogue between the 
government and bondholders 

We have complied with the requirements established under Section 201(b) of PROMESA for a fiscal plan that 
provides a method to achieve fiscal responsibility and access to the capital markets

Fiscal Plan Requirements – Section 201(b) of PROMESA 

8

Provide for estimates of revenues and expenditures in conformance with agreed accounting 
standards and be based on (i) applicable laws; or (ii) specific bills that require enactment in 
order to reasonably achieve the projections of the fiscal plan

Ensure the funding of essential public services

Provide adequate funding for public pension systems

For fiscal years in which a stay is not effective, provide for a debt burden that is sustainable

Improve fiscal governance, accountability and internal controls

Enable the achievement of fiscal targets





Section III – Fiscal 

Reform Measures

Section V – Debt 

Sustainability

Section II – Financial 

Projections

Section VII – Financial 

Control Reform

Provide for the elimination of structural deficits

Requirements

References

Status

Section III – Fiscal 

Reform Measures

Section VII – Financial 

Control Reform

Section III – Fiscal 

Reform Measures

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

9

Fiscal Plan Requirements – Section 201(b) of PROMESA

We have complied with the requirements established under Section 201(b) of PROMESA for a fiscal plan that 
provides a method to achieve fiscal responsibility and access to the capital markets

Create independent forecasts of revenue for the period covered by the fiscal plan

Include a debt sustainability analysis

Provide for capital expenditures and investments necessary to promote economic growth

Include such additional information as the Oversight Board deems necessary

Ensure that assets, funds, or resources of a territorial instrumentality are not loaned to, transferred 
to, or otherwise used for the benefit of a covered territory or another covered territorial 
instrumentality of a covered territory, unless permitted

Respect the relative lawful priorities or lawful liens in the constitution, other laws, or agreements 
of a covered territory or covered territorial instrumentality in effect prior to the enactment of 
PROMESA





Section IV –

Structural Reforms

May be amended 

or supplemented 

Ongoing

Section II – Financial 

Projections 

Ongoing

Adopt appropriate recommendations submitted by the Oversight Board

Requirements

Status

References

May be amended 

or supplemented 

Section V – Debt 

Sustainability

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

II. BACKGROUND

10