Team Up uses tuition, delivered by inspirational 

university students, to enable secondary school pupils 

from low income backgrounds to meaningfully 

increase their academic attainment, in order to 

improve the choices open to them. 

 

 

Team Up 

Evaluation Report 

2014-2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contents 

Introduction ............................................................................................................................................................ 2

 

Our targets for 2014/15 .......................................................................................................................................... 4

 

Scale ................................................................................................................................................................... 4

 

Impact ................................................................................................................................................................. 4

 

Monitoring and Evaluation ................................................................................................................................. 4

 

Cost Effectiveness ............................................................................................................................................... 5

 

Our Progress in achieving our targets................................................................................................................... 5

 

Scale ................................................................................................................................................................... 5

 

Impact ................................................................................................................................................................. 6

 

Quantitative Data ........................................................................................................................................... 6

 

Qualitative Feedback...................................................................................................................................... 7

 

Monitoring and Evaluation ................................................................................................................................. 8

 

Cost Effectiveness ............................................................................................................................................... 9

 

Learning and Reflections ..................................................................................................................................... 10

 

Next steps............................................................................................................................................................. 11

 

Scale ................................................................................................................................................................. 11

 

Impact and Evaluation ..................................................................................................................................... 11

 

 

 

Introduction  

 

In 2014/2015 Team Up aimed to significantly scale-up our delivery, which has resulted in more pupils than 
ever receiving Team Up tuition, and some significant lessons learned about how to build our capacity in order 
to provide meaningful change to pupils’ academic achievement. 

This document reports against the following priority areas for the organisation in 2014/15: 

1.  Our targets for 2014/15 

o  Scale 
o  Impact 
o  Monitoring and Evaluation 

2.  Progress in realising our targets 

o  Scale 
o  Impact 
o  Monitoring and Evaluation 

3.  Learnings, Reflections and next steps 

The last two years have been an exciting period for the organisation and this report intends to summarise the 
organisation’s progress and subsequent actions that it will take to develop further.  We feel we have learned 

 

 

 

 

some significant lessons about how to ensure our work really makes a difference, and feel excited about the 
future we can envision where the structure and performance of our programme changes lives.  

 

 

 

 

Our targets for 2014/15  

 

In this section we will set out what we aimed to achieve in 2014/15. Our three focus areas for the year were 
to rapidly scale, continue our track record of having a high impact on young people’s progress rates and to 
develop the way we monitor and evaluate the programme. 

Scale 

We set out to deliver a tuition programme in Maths, English and Science, at Key Stages  3 and 4, to 2,100 
pupils across the following regions: 

 

Impact 

Following the successes of our 13/14 tuition programme, we planned to support children who were making 
less than 1 sublevel of progress to make 1.8 sublevels of progress, which is closer to the national average. Of 
those who were sitting their GCSE’s in 2014/15, we planned for 70% to have secured the grades to progress 
onto further education and employment.

1

 

 

Monitoring and Evaluation 

In 2014/15 we aimed for our evaluation to meet NESTA’s stage 2 Standards of Evaluation, following our Stage 
1 award in 2013; this would demonstrate our progress in the way we monitor and evaluate our programme. 
In  order  to  achieve  this,  we  planned  to  standardise  our  procedures  and  conduct  a  full  evaluation  in  four 
stages. In 2014/15 we planned to execute the first two stages: 
 
 

                                                                 

1

 5 C grades or above, including English and Maths 

Cambridge 

Leeds 

Nottingham 

Coventry / Warwick 

London 

Oxford 

Birmingham  

Liverpool 

Sheffield 

Derby  

Manchester 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Cost Effectiveness 

 

Less than 15% of young people who are eligible for free school meals receive private tuition, compared to 
nearly 40% of their more privileged peers

2

. Our aim is to lower the cost of tuition in order to provide tuition at 

a rate that is significantly lower than market rates, which is currently just over £20 per hour nationally.  

 

Our Progress in achieving our targets 

 

In this section we will set out what we achieved in respect of our 2014/15 targets:  

Scale 

The Team Up 2014/15 programme achieved the following: 

 

Team Up worked with 2,100 pupils 

 

Team Up provided tuition for 55 schools  

 

We delivered tuition in all the cities / regions that we planned to 

 

Team Up provided tuition in Maths, English and Science to Key Stage 3 and 4 

 

We also delivered enrichment events for our schools through insight days with PwC and Lloyds Banking 
Group, which gave pupils exclusive access to PwC and the post 16 opportunities available there 

                                                                 

2

 http://www.suttontrust.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/1parentpower-final.pdf 

Stage 1:

Standardisation, 

consolidation and 

implementation

Stage 2: 

Level 2 evaluation

Stage 3: 

Refinement 

Stage 4: 

Level 3 evaluation

Stage 1: Standardisation, consolidation and 
implementation 
 
Implement a process of base lining, standardising and 
formalising the service that we deliver to schools, in 
order to create a clear set of delivery outcomes and 
processes, which we can then evaluate over the 2014-
2015 programme. 
 
Stage 2: Level 2 Evaluation 
 
Report on: 

 

Baseline, mid-point and end point data 
collection 

 

Data collection at end of each tutorial 

 

Formalised focus group feedback integrated 
into programme  

 

A range of outcomes assessed and 
triangulated at various intervals through: 

o  Observations 
o  Surveys  
o  Reports 

 

St

ag

es 1 

and 

2

2

0

14

/15

 

St

ag

es 3

 an

d 4

2

0

15

/16

 

 

 

 

 

 

Impact 

We managed to continue our track record of demonstrably improving pupil attainment, across all 
key stages and subjects. We obtained two types of impact data, quantitative and qualitative.  
 

Quantitative Data 

 

We collected quantitative data about pupils’ baseline school levels at the start of the programme, 
and we compared this with their levels at the end of programme. On average, pupils increased 
by 1.96 sub levels across the cohort.  A breakdown of subject progression can be found below:  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

64%  of  the  data  reflected  pupil  attainment  at  Key  Stage  3.  This  data  suggests  that  our  tuition 
helped pupils to achieve more than double the national rate of expected progress of pupils over 
a year

3

.   

Several of our schools significantly exceeded our target, for example: 

 

St Angela’s Ursuline School Team Up pupils achieved an average increase of 2.48 sub-
levels in English 

 

Grey Court School Team Up pupils achieved an average increase of 3 sub-levels in Maths 

 

Evelyn Grace Academy Team Up pupils achieved an average increase of 2.91 sub levels 
in Science 

We will dedicate more resource in future to better understand why these schools performed so 
well. 
 

                                                                 

3

 Research Report DFE-RR096: ‘How do pupils progress during Key Stages 2 and 3?’ 

Subject 

Sub-level 
Increase 

English 

1.88 

Maths 

1.97 

Science 

2.06 

“It's a 
small group 
so it helps 
us 
concentrate 
and not get 
easily 
distracted.” 

  

“It's giving 
me extra 
information 
that I can 
use towards 
my GCSEs in 
May. My 
tutor knows 
how to 
explain 
things so 
that I can 
understand 
things 
clearly. 
Also, it has 
allowed me 
to be ahead 
of my work 
in school 
and it gives 
me a lot of 
background 
knowledge 
about the 
subject that 
I wouldn't 
necessarily 
get in 
school.” 

 

“The 
programme is 
helping me 
by making 
learning 
interesting 
and fun.” 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Qualitative Feedback

 

 

We also asked our pupils to complete an anonymous survey to tell us what they thought 
about the programme.  The survey asked pupils: 

1.  “Overall how much are you enjoying the programme?”  
2.  “Overall how much do you think the programme is helping you to improve your 

grades at school?” 

3.  To provide feedback to their tutors about what they were doing well and  what 

they could improve 

4.  How the programme could be improved 
5.  “To what extent did TU support you to secure your school leavers qualifications” 

(this question was asked to school leavers only) 

432 pupils from 30 schools completed the survey.  

 

 

“Overall how much are you enjoying the programme?”  

Scale: 1-7, 1=not at all, 7 = very much 

The  average  score  for  enjoyment  was  5.5  out  of  7,  whilst  80%  gave  an  answer  of  5+, 
indicating a high level of enjoyment amongst the pupils. 

“Overall how much do you think the programme is helping you to improve your grades at 
school?” 

Scale: 1-7, 1=not at all, 7 = very much 

The average score for academic progress was 5.5 out of 7, whilst 79% gave an answer of 
5+, indicating the majority of students felt the programme was helping them.   

 

 

4

3

15

46

80

91

92

1

6

22

36

70

108

85

0

20

40

60

80

100

120

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

N

u

m

b

er 

o

f p

u

p

ils

Ranking: 1 being the lowest score, 7 being the highest

Pupil Feedback 2014 / 2015 Survey   

Overall how much are you enjoying the programme?
Overall how much are you enjoying the programme?

 

“We are 
going over 
things that 
we didn't 
understand 
before in 
more depth. 
This makes 
us 
understand 
the 
questions in 
an exam 
better and 
therefore 
may improve 
my grade for 
the GCSE 
exam.” 

 

“It's been 
making me 
understand 
things more 
clearly. So 
I know how 
to do them 
in class.” 

 

“It’s making 
me work more 
confidently 
and making 
me think 
faster than 
I usually 
do.” 

 

“They teach 
in detail, 
and they 
helped me to 
do well in 
my 
coursework. 
My tutor has 
helped me to 
better my 
knowledge in 
certain 
topics.” 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monitoring and Evaluation 

 
We made significant progress in developing the way we monitor and evaluate our systems, with the aim to 
progress  onto  NESTA’s  Level  2  Standard  of  Evaluation  Award.  Our  developments  consisted  of  two  stages, 
which is described further in this section.  
 
Stage 1: Standardisation, consolidation and implementation 
Team Up has made huge strides  in standardising,  formalising and  rationalising our programme structure 
and programme processes.  This can be demonstrated by the publication of our programme resources. Our 
major achievements are: 

 

Creating a clear programme set up process to get schools and their pupils set up for the programme, 
and to induct, train and place tutors in schools 

 

Creating clear programme delivery methods to ensure a well run programme 

 

Creating clear tactical and  strategic  data collection methods to course correct and  to ensure and 
measure impact 

 
Stage 2: Level 2 Evaluation 
Baseline, mid-point and end point data collection 
 
Team Up collected two types of data to be able to track distance travelled: 
 
Method 1: A Team Up before and after exam (1st exam to be marked by tutors as part of their training) 
Method 2: School levels/grades of pupils before and after the Team Up intervention 
 
Review of Method 1 
We were able to collect a significant amount of pupil data, which informed our impact analysis. The challenges 
we faced were:  
 

1.  The logistics were, at times, hard to implement 

Without our own curriculum, we used national curriculum assessments, which had to be mapped onto the 
subject and exam boards of the schools.  This meant there were 24 different assessment papers that schools 
could pick from.  Most assessments were 3 hours long, when schools only had time to do a one hour test.  In 
addition, the process of getting the papers to schools, getting them back from schools and then getting them 
to tutors took longer than anticipated. 
 

2.  It was difficult to get many schools to baseline their pupils 

The  coordinators  managing  Team  Up  in  their  schools  did  not  understand  why  we  needed  more  data  in 
addition to their own recent exams/assessment data, and felt they did not have the time to do it themselves. 
 

3.  It was difficult to get tutors to mark the baseline papers 

It was difficult to get papers to volunteers in time for them to mark and it was felt that we were already asking 
a lot of tutors – i.e. to complete their DBS and safeguarding training and attend their induction - before we 
had even met them and ensured their investment in the programme. 
 
Review of Method 2 
Method 2 was more successful as the data formed part of already-existing data collection methods, but even 
with this it was hard to get data from all of our schools.  
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 
 

Data collection at the end of each tutorial 
 
Team Up asked all tutors to complete an impact report after every session.  This report asked for: 

 

The topic that was taught 

 

Evaluation of the following inputs of the pupil (1- 6, where 1 = poor, 6 = excellent) 

o  Effort 
o  Conduct 
o  Independent learning skills 
o  Organisational skills 

 

Evaluation of the following outcomes of the pupil (1- 6, where 1 = poor, 6 = excellent) 

o  Academic progress 

 

Comments about the session 

   
Formalised focus group feedback integrated into programme  
 
Our  focus  group  process  was  integrated  into  the  Theory  of  Change  workshops  where  we  had  student 
representatives attend sessions. 
 
A range of outcomes assessed and triangulated at various intervals  
 

 

Observations  -  approximately  40%  of  our  tutors  were  observed  and  given  feedback  over  the 
programme 

 

Surveys: 

o  All tutors were invited to take part in a number of surveys.  145 tutors completed the end of 

programme survey. 

o  432 pupils took part in the end of programme survey. 
o  All schools were invited to take part in an end of programme survey.  24 schools took part 

in the end of programme survey. 

 
Overall our intended evaluation processes reflected  our concerted efforts to better understand the way we 
evaluate our work. We have used this learning to provide future recommendations for the organisation, which 
is outlined in the next section.   
 

Cost Effectiveness 

A recent study by First Tutors found that the average cost of secondary tuition nationally is £20.07 per hour 
per pupil, and that rates are even higher in London

4

. Through Team Up tuition we planned to offer support to 

less than half the average costs per hour per pupil. 

The average cost of Team Up tuition at our schools in 2014/15 was £7.72 per hour per pupil. Our programme 
is roughly a third of the price of the national average cost of tuition, making it very cost effective.  

 
 
 
 

                                                                 

4

 Data taken from the Sutton Trust, 2011 

 

 

 

10 

 

Learning and Reflections 

 

There were several ways in which Team Up benefited from the fast growth it undertook from 2014-2015.  We 
learned very quickly of the key areas that we need to get right to run a programme at scale, such as a robust 
curriculum, high quality tutors and ‘more on the ground’ management structure.  As a result Team Up have 
invested time and energy in improving our management systems, and we feel that we have the right team 
and organisational structure in place to take us forward.   

The growth we undertook revealed areas in the model that we plan to strengthen to be able to operate at 
scale.  These are outlined in the table below, with some recommendations on how we move forward: 

Issue 

Recommendations for 2015/16 

Tutor  supply  in  rural 
areas 

Scale  back  the  programme  to  London  where  partnerships  are  strong.  Before 
scaling to new regions, spend 12 months building partnerships with recruitment 
channels. 

Using volunteer students 
to  manage  sessions  in 
addition to tutoring 
 

Reduce the case load of schools to Programme Manager, to allow Programme 
Managers  more  time  to  visit  sessions  each  week  and  carry  out  impact  and 
evaluation  activities.  This  will  provide  the  oversight  required  and  reduce  the 
requirement for school teachers to run the programme.  

Too high a case load of 
schools  per Programme 
Manager 

 

These  realisations  prompted  a  period  of  great  reflection  and  research  throughout  the  first  half  of  2015, 
channelled  through  the  Impetus-PEF  ‘theory  of  change’  process,  and  resulting  in  some  significant 
developments  to  the  Team  Up  Programme  model.    Team  Up  planned  to  provide  more  ‘on-the-ground’ 
support, particularly during sessions. To achieve this also meant improving the quality and commitment of 
our tutor resource and providing them with tools and management to be more effective.