Piracetam and Piracetam-Like Drugs

From Basic Science to Novel Clinical Applications to CNS Disorders

Andrei G. Malykh and M. Reza Sadaie

NovoMed Consulting, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA

Contents

Abstract. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287
1. Therapeutic Applications and Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289
2. Marketed Products. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290
3. Mechanisms of Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290
4. Pharmacology and Classification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294

4.1 Subgroup 1: Cognitive Enhancers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294

4.1.1 Piracetam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294
4.1.2 Oxiracetam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298
4.1.3 Pramiracetam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298
4.1.4 Aniracetam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299
4.1.5 Phenylpiracetam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299

4.2 Subgroup 2: Antiepileptic

/Anticonvulsive Drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302

4.2.1 Levetiracetam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302
4.2.2 Brivaracetam and Seletracetam. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303

4.3 Subgroup 3: Compounds with Unknown Efficacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303

4.3.1 Nefiracetam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303
4.3.2 Nebracetam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303
4.3.3 Rolipram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303
4.3.4 Fasoracetam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304
4.3.5 Coluracetam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304
4.3.6 Rolziracetam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304
4.3.7 Dimiracetam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304

5. Discussion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304
6. Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307

Abstract

There is an increasing interest in nootropic drugs for the treatment of CNS

disorders. Since the last meta-analysis of the clinical efficacy of piracetam, more
information has accumulated. The primary objective of this systematic survey is
to evaluate the clinical outcomes as well as the scientific literature relating to the
pharmacology, pharmacokinetics

/pharmacodynamics, mechanism of action,

dosing, toxicology and adverse effects of marketed and investigational drugs.
The major focus of the literature search was on articles demonstrating evidence-
based clinical investigations during the past 10 years for the following ther-
apeutic categories of CNS disorders: (i) cognition

/memory; (ii) epilepsy and

seizure; (iii) neurodegenerative diseases; (iv) stroke

/ischaemia; and (v) stress

and anxiety.

R

EVIEW

A

RTICLE

Drugs 2010; 70 (3): 287-312

0012-6667/10/0003-0287/$55.55/0

ª

2010 Adis Data Information BV. All rights reserved.

In this article, piracetam-like compounds are divided into three subgroups

based on their chemical structures, known efficacy and intended clinical uses.
Subgroup 1 drugs include piracetam, oxiracetam, aniracetam, pramiracetam
and phenylpiracetam, which have been used in humans and some of which are
available as dietary supplements. Of these, oxiracetam and aniracetam are no
longer in clinical use. Pramiracetam reportedly improved cognitive deficits as-
sociated with traumatic brain injuries. Although piracetam exhibited no long-
term benefits for the treatment of mild cognitive impairments, recent studies
demonstrated its neuroprotective effect when used during coronary bypass
surgery. It was also effective in the treatment of cognitive disorders of cere-
brovascular and traumatic origins; however, its overall effect on lowering de-
pression and anxiety was higher than improving memory. As add-on therapy, it
appears to benefit individuals with myoclonus epilepsy and tardive dyskinesia.
Phenylpiracetam is more potent than piracetam and is used for a wider range of
indications. In combination with a vasodilator drug, piracetam appeared to
have an additive beneficial effect on various cognitive disabilities. Subgroup 2
drugs include levetiracetam, seletracetam and brivaracetam, which demonstrate
antiepileptic activity, although their cognitive effects are unclear. Subgroup 3
includes piracetam derivatives with unknown clinical efficacies, and of these
nefiracetam failed to improve cognition in post-stroke patients and rolipram is
currently in clinical trials as an antidepressant. The remaining compounds of
this subgroup are at various preclinical stages of research.

The modes of action of piracetam and most of its derivatives remain an

enigma. Differential effects on subtypes of glutamate receptors, but not the
GABAergic actions, have been implicated. Piracetam seems to activate cal-
cium influx into neuronal cells; however, this function is questionable in the
light of findings that a persistent calcium inflow may have deleterious impact
on neuronal cells. Although subgroup 2 compounds act via binding to
another neuronal receptor (synaptic vesicle 2A), some of the subgroup
3 compounds, such as nefiracetam, are similar to those of subgroup 1. Based
on calculations of the efficacy rates, our assessments indicate notable
improvements in clinical outcomes with some of these agents.

Piracetam (pyrrolidone acetamide) and related

small molecule ligands share a five-carbon oxo-
pyrrolidone ring, also referred to as racetams,
belong to the class of nootropic compounds in a
broader definition. The term ‘nootrope’ (from the
Greek words

noos for mind and tropein for to-

wards) was proposed initially when a positive ef-
fect of piracetam on cognitive improvement was
demonstrated.

[1]

Piracetam and piracetam-like

drugs are modulators of cerebral functions.
These agents are also used in efforts to restore
memory and brain performance in patients with
encephalopathies of various aetiologies, includ-
ing cranial traumas, inflammation and stroke

/

ischaemia complications after bypass surgery,
while some derivatives are indicated for neuro-
logical disorders such as seizures and neuromus-
cular convulsions.

The need for new medications for age-related

CNS problems will increase in the near future
as the generation of baby boomers approach
retirement age. Memory loss is one of the major
factors affecting the everyday living activities of
the elderly population. Since the discovery of
piracetam in the late 1960s, more than a dozen
lead

piracetam-like

substances

have

been

synthesized and proposed for treatment of cog-
nitive impairment and CNS disorders.

288

Malykh & Sadaie

ª 2010 Adis Data Information BV. All rights reserved.

Drugs 2010; 70 (3)

The aim of this review is to summarize the

(i) status of marketed piracetam-like drugs;
(ii) data on the known chemical structures and
their crucial pharmacological properties; and
(iii) current trend and validity of clinical ob-
servations regarding the effects of piracetam-like
compounds on brain performance and cognition.
The major questions addressed in this article are:
(i) what is the literature trend toward lead clinical
candidate compounds in terms of potency and
target specificity?; (ii) do improvements in design
of new-generation chemical entities translate to
improved clinical efficacy?; and (iii) do the ex-
panded indications for the first-generation com-
pounds exhibit any meaningful patient benefits?
To determine the major trends in this field, we
have surveyed the strength of associations
between known mechanisms of drug action,
findings in animal test systems and their re-
levance to clinical trial outcomes. We have
compiled, tabulated and analysed clinical find-
ings, and discuss the advantages and limitations
of old- and new-generation piracetam-like com-
pounds, and potential relevant areas that require
further research.

1. Therapeutic Applications and
Publications

Numerous broad clinical applications are at-

tributed to piracetam,

[2]

many of which are based

on open-label and

/or non-controlled studies in

animals and humans. Piracetam and its analogues
have been used for various therapeutic interven-
tions relating to the CNS, including (i) cognition

/

memory; (ii) epilepsy and seizure; (iii) neurode-
generative diseases; (iv) stroke

/ischaemia; and

(v) stress and anxiety.

Piracetam-related

compounds

have

been

extensively researched and large numbers of
publications reported in the past 3 decades. From
more than a dozen new products, eight have en-
tered clinical investigations for various CNS in-
dications in recent years. We searched the US
national clinical trials databank,

[3]

PubMed and

the Internet. The search criteria for clinical data
in PubMed were ‘clinical trial’ and the tag term
‘title

/abstract’. The total number of clinical pub-

lications representing all compounds exceeds 300.
While most papers on piracetam were published
more than 10 years ago, the highest number in the
past 3 years concern levetiracetam. To highlight
these trends better, we tabulated the search
results to indicate the numbers, sequence and
continuity. Table I shows both ascending and
descending number of articles for the indicated
periods. Two reviews describe meta-analyses: one
on efficacy of piracetam in cognitive impairment,

[4]

and the other on piracetam and piracetam-like
compounds in experimental stroke in animals.

[5]

The PubMed search for phenylpiracetam, only
with its trade name (Phenotropil



), retrieved

Table I. Number of clinical trial publications on piracetam-related ligands

a

Products

3 y
(2007

–2009)

3 y
(2004

–2006)

5 y
(1999

–2003)

>10 y
(prior to 1999)

Levetiracetam

98

70

35

2

Piracetam

10

3

18

118

Phenylpiracetam

5

3

Brivaracetam

3

Nefiracetam

2

Fasoracetam

1

Oxiracetam

22

Rolipram

1

10

Pramiracetam

4

Aniracetam

6

Nebracetam

3

a

PubMed was searched with the indicated time limits and keywords, including the product names and other used names phenotropil,
phenotropyl, WEB 1881 FU, NS 105, LAM 105 and MKC-231 (last accessed on 23 January 2010).

Piracetam and Related Drugs for CNS Disorders

289

ª 2010 Adis Data Information BV. All rights reserved.

Drugs 2010; 70 (3)

eight articles, of which six were clinical trials in
patient with neurological disorders. Several se-
lected publications on phenylpiracetam that we cite
here are from Russian journals, which are not in
PubMed. We reviewed, without a selection bias,
key and core articles that demonstrate evidence-
based clinical investigations and other available
information on marketed products, clinical find-
ings, non-clinical biochemical and pharmacologi-
cal data, and promising piracetam-like drugs with
unknown benefit-risk profiles.

2. Marketed Products

There are six relevant medications on the mar-

ket worldwide (table II). Piracetam and levetir-
acetam were developed by UCB Pharma, Belgium;
oxiracetam by ISF, Italy; aniracetam by Roche
Pharmaceuticals, Switzerland; pramiracetam by
Warner-Lambert, USA;

[6]

and phenylpiracetam by

the Medical-Biological Institute of the Russian
Academy of Sciences (manufactured by Valenta
Pharmaceuticals, Russia). The product insert (In-
ternational Anti-Aging Systems, UK) states that

oxiracetam is for ‘‘mental syndromes caused by
cerebral insufficiency, disturbances in mental per-
formance in the elderly, and no adverse interac-
tions have been noted’’, but it is unavailable from
this supplier. In 2003, the State Pharmacological
Committee of Russia approved phenylpiracetam
as a prescription drug for cerebrovascular defi-
ciency, depression, apathy, attention and memory
decline, and it is recommended for cosmonauts for
increasing physical and mental

/cognitive activities

in space.

[7]

Levetiracetam was initially approved in

the US in 1999 as adjunctive therapy for partial
onset seizures in adults and children aged

‡4 years,

and for adults and adolescents with myoclonic
epilepsy. The European Medicines Agency recently
approved it as monotherapy for partial seizures
and as adjunctive therapy for tonic-clonic seizures.
With the exception of levetiracetam, these products
are not registered as ethical medications in the US.

3. Mechanisms of Action

The pharmacology of piracetam-related drugs

has been less explored than the clinical applications

Table II. Marketed piracetam-like drug products and dietary supplements

a

Active compound

Trade name

Indication(s)

Availability

Adverse effects

R

x

non-R

x

Piracetam

Nootropil



Nootrop



Nootropyl



Neurocognitive impairments,
memory decline, cortical
myoclonus

Tablet

/injectable

(EU)

Capsule

Sleep disturbance, diarrhoea
(uncommon)

Piracetam

+ cinnarizine Fezam



Cerebral circulation disorders

Capsule
(Bulgaria,
Russia)

Irritation, dyspepsia, headache

Oxiracetam

Neuromet



Aging mental impairments

Capsule

Psychomotor excitability, sleep
disorders

Aniracetam

Ampamet



Draganon



Sarpul



Memory decline,
neurodegenerative disorders

Tablet

Agitation, anxiety, restlessness,
insomnia

Pramiracetam

Neupramir



Pramistar



Aging mental impairments,
anxiety

Tablet

Insomnia, dysphoria, gastralgia,
heartburn

Phenylpiracetam

Phenotropil



Mental function impairment
CNS, neurotic disorders

Tablet (Russia)

Sleep disturbance

Levetiracetam

Keppra



Epilepsy

Tablet

/injectable

(EU, USA)

Somnolence, fatigue,
coordination difficulties,
behavioural abnormalities

a

R

x

and non-R

x

dose forms of the marketed piracetam-like compounds, their indications

/claimed therapeutic areas, and probable, common

and

/or generally mild adverse effects are summarized from information provided in manufacturers’ package inserts/product labels. Non-R

x

forms are available from online sources.

Non-R

x

= non-prescription; R

x

= prescription.

290

Malykh & Sadaie

ª 2010 Adis Data Information BV. All rights reserved.

Drugs 2010; 70 (3)

of these drugs and remains to be elucidated.
These compounds interact with target receptors
in brain and modulate the excitatory and

/or

inhibitory processes of neurotransmitters, neuro-
hormones and

/or post-synaptic signals. The ef-

fect(s) on signal trafficking can have an impact on
cognition and neurological behaviours. Several
groups have suggested the roles of piracetam in
energy metabolism, including (i) increased oxy-
gen utilization in the brain, and permeability of
cell and mitochondrial membranes to inter-
mediaries of the Krebs cycle;

[8,9]

and (ii) synthesis

of cytochrome b5.

[10]

These actions are possibly

downstream consequences of piracetam on ion
channels and

/or ion transporters in neurons

(see later this section).

The similarity of its chemical structure to a

cyclic derivative of GABA suggests that pir-
acetam probably has a GABA-mimetic action.

[11]

To date, this mechanism remains unclear. Others
have proposed that it functions as an antioxidant

/

neurotonic

[12,13]

and increases the density of ace-

tylcholine receptor.

[14]

Comparative and com-

pelling data for these potential functions are
unavailable. It is also unclear how piracetam
exerts its broad clinical benefits through these
actions. Because of differences among piracetam
derivatives (table III, figure 1), it is unlikely that
all these drugs will operate in a similar manner,
use the same cell type(s) or drug target(s), or
both. For that matter, their pharmacokinetics,
degradation kinetics, fate of metabolites, and
even ADMET (adsorption, distribution, meta-
bolism, excretion and toxicity) properties, can
vary. These variations can be quite profound
when the studies use different test systems.

It is reasonable to expect that the compounds

with ‘minimal’ changes in their chemical struc-
tures share the same mechanism of action, such
as binding to or modulating a selective subset
of neurotransmitter receptors. The following
hypotheses focus on modulation of ionotropic,
ligand-gated and

/or voltage-dependent ion chan-

nels, such as [Na

+

/Ca

2

+]

]

/K

+

exchanger pumps

in neuronal cell membranes or neuromuscular
junctions.

The subgroup 1 agents piracetam, oxiracetam

and aniracetam (table III, figure 1) activate

a-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate
(AMPA)-type glutamate receptors but not kainate
or NMDA receptors in neuronal cultures. This
action increases the density of receptor binding
sites for AMPA and calcium uptake,

[38]

pre-

sumably resulting in elevation of intracellular cal-
cium ([Ca

2

+

]i). Pramiracetam increases the rate of

sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake in
rat hippocampal synaptosomes

in vitro, suggesting

that its effect on cognitive functions might occur
via acceleration of cholinergic neuronal impulse
flow in the septal-hippocampal region.

[39]

The af-

finity of phenylpiracetam to the nicotinitic acet-
ylcholine (nACh) receptor, but not the glutamate
NMDA subtype, was demonstrated in ligand-
binding experiments

in vitro. However, injection of

this drug (100 mg

/kg, intraperitoneally) to rats in-

creases the numbers of both nACh and NMDA
receptors, but decreases serotonin and dopamine
receptors in the brain tissue.

[40]

For subgroup 2 drugs (table III, figure 1),

more recent data assert that levetiracetam prob-
ably acts through an alternative mechanism for
its antiepileptic activity. At a therapeutic dose
range, it was initially shown to decrease incoming
ions in AMPA- and kainite-induced currents in
cultured cortical neurons.

[41]

In contrast to sub-

group 1 compounds, levetiracetam apparently
inhibits neuronal Ca

2

+

ion channels that are

possibly important to its antiepileptic effect.

[41-43]

In a different experimental setting using a seizure
model in mice, it was later demonstrated to bind
to synaptic vesicle 2A (SV2A) protein in brain
membranes and fibroblasts.

[44]

The data corre-

lated with the clinical application of levetir-
acetam as an antiepileptic drug (AED).

[44]

Brivaracetam and seletracetam, the newer-gen-
eration chemical entities after levetiracetam, bind
to SV2A with a higher affinity and are currently
being evaluated clinically for their antiepileptic
properties.

[23,24]

It is unclear whether subgroup 2

drugs

affect

other

physiological

(nonpatho-

logical) roles of SV2A and

/or disturb the normal

homeostasis of calcium in different regions of
brain. It is unlikely that only one mechanism of
action is operative

in vivo, allowing a selective

pharmacological advantage to these drugs con-
sidering the closeness of their molecular structures

Piracetam and Related Drugs for CNS Disorders

291

ª 2010 Adis Data Information BV. All rights reserved.

Drugs 2010; 70 (3)

Table III. Pharmacological properties of piracetam-like compounds

Category

Active compound

IUPAC name

Potency

a

(dosage)

Bioavailability
(

%)

b

Half-life

b

References

Subgroup 1:
cognitive enhancers

Piracetam

2-oxo-1-pyrrolidineacetamide

Low: 50 to

>300 mg/kg/d

(up to 37 g

/d)

~100

4

–5 h

6

c

Oxiracetam

2-(4-hydroxy-2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl)acetamide

Medium: 25

–40 mg/kg/d

(up to 2.4 g

/d)

~75

3

–6 h

6,15

Pramiracetam

N-[2-(dipropan-2-ylamino)ethyl]-2-
(2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl)acetamide

Medium: 10

–20 mg/kg/d

(1.2 g

/d)

~100

2

–8 h

6,16,17

Aniracetam

1-[(4-methoxybenzoyl)]-2-pyrrolidinone

Medium:
12

–25 mg/kg/d (1.5 g/d)

~11

1

–2.5 h

6,18

Phenylpiracetam

2-(4-phenyl-2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl)acetamide

High: 2.5

–5 mg/kg/d

(up to 0.75 g

/d)

~100

3

–5 h

19,20

c

Subgroup 2:
antiepileptic drugs

Levetiracetam

(2S)-2-(2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl)butanamide

Medium: 20

–60 mg/kg/d

(up to 3 g

/d)

~100

6

–8 h

6

c

Brivaracetam

(2S)-2-[(4R)-2-oxo-4-propylpyrrolidin-1-yl]
butanamide

Medium: 10

–25 mg/kg/d

(up to 1.4 g

/d)

~90

7

–8 h

21,22

Seletracetam

(2S)-2-[(4R)-4-(2,2-difluoroethenyl)-2-oxo-
pyrrolidin-1-yl]butanamide

High: 0.03

–10 mg/kg/d

(up to 0. 6 g

/d)

>90

8 h

23,24

Subgroup 3:
unknown clinical efficacy

Nefiracetam

N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)-2-(2-oxopyrrolidin-1-
yl)acetamide

Medium: 10

–15 mg/kg/d

(up to 0.9 g

/d)

NA

3

–5 h

25,26

Nebracetam

4-(aminomethyl)-1-benzyl-pyrrolidin-2-one

Medium: 200

–800 mg/d

NA

NA

27,28

Rolipram

4-(3-cyclopentyloxy-4-methoxy-phenyl)pyrrolidin-
2-one

High: 0.75

–3.0 mg/d

>70

2 h

29,30

Fasoracetam
(NS-105)

(5R)-5-(piperidine-1-carbonyl) pyrrolidin-2-one

High: 100 mg

/d)

79

–97

4

–6.5 h

31,32

Coluracetam
(MKC-231)

N-(2,3-dimethyl-5,6,7,8- tetrahydrofuro[2,3-b]
quinolin-4-yl)-2-(2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl)acetamide

NA

NA

NA

33,34

Rolziracetam

2,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1H-pyrrolizine-3,5-dione

NA

~90

<25 min

35

Dimiracetam

dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[1,2-a]imidazole-2,5(3H,6H)-
diones

NA

NA

NA

36,37

a

To compare the potencies for each drug, we calculated the daily treatment dose (assuming that the average weight of a patient is 60 kg) and defined the values as low
(

>50 mg/kg/d), medium (10–50 mg/kg/d) and high (<10 mg/kg/d).

b

Selected pharmacokinetic outcome measures, bioavailability and half-life in plasma represent the values derived from pharmacokinetic examinations on humans, except those of
aniracetam and rolziracetam, which were tested on rodents.

c

Pharmacokinetic and dose values described in product insert as well as reference.

IUPAC

= International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry; NA = not available.

292

Malykh

&

Sadaie

ª

2010

Adis

Data

Infor

mation

BV
.

All
rights

reserved.

Drugs

2010;

70
(3)

N

N

H

O

O

N

N

H

O

N

O

O

N

O

O

Coluracetam

(MKC-231)

Rolziracetam

Dimiracetam

N

O

N

H

O

N

NH

2

O

N

O

H

N

O

Nefiracetam

Nebracetam

Rolipram

Fasoracetam

(NS-105)

N

NH

2

O

O

N

NH

2

O

O

F

F

Levetiracetam

Brivaracetam

Seletracetam

N

NH

2

O

O

N

NH

2

O

O

OH

N

N

H

O

O

N

N

O

O

O

Piracetam

Oxiracetam

Pramiracetam

Aniracetam

N

O

NH

2

O

Phenylpiracetam

a

b

c

O

N

NH

2

CH

3

O

O

O

H

N

O

Fig. 1. Chemical structures and pharmacological properties of piracetam-like compounds: (a) subgroup 1 cognitive enhancers; (b) subgroup
2 antiepileptic drugs; and (c) subgroup 3 unknown clinical efficacy.

Piracetam and Related Drugs for CNS Disorders

293

ª 2010 Adis Data Information BV. All rights reserved.

Drugs 2010; 70 (3)

to subgroup 1 and

/or their pharmacodynamic

attributes. This contention applies particularly to
subgroup 3 compounds, which indicate more ex-
tensive differences in their chemical structures
than most other derivatives (table III, figure 1).

In contrast to subgroup 1 and 2 compounds,

the subgroup 3 compound nefiracetam appears
to potentiate NMDA receptors. In cultured cor-
tical neurons of rats, this action occurs indirectly
via activation of protein kinase C (PKC) and
phosphorylation of one of the subunits of the
heterotetramer NMDA receptor (NR1). This in
turn enhances binding of glycine to NMDA, and
removes the suppression of voltage-dependent
currents caused by Mg

2

+

ions.

[45]

Expelling Mg

2

+

ions can open up the gate and allow Ca

2

+

to flow

into the cytosol. This depolarization can cause a
net positive and

/or negative effect, as discussed

previously. Furthermore, previous contradictory
results regarding nefiracetam potentiation of

a4b2-

type nACh receptors at various sites are possibly
reconciled, considering that different PKC iso-
zymes were involved in different tissues.

[45]

On the other hand, nebracetam supposedly

interacts largely with the ligand-gated NMDA re-
ceptor. This enables the drug to inhibit the (po-
tentially lethal) excessive [Ca

2

+

]i through NMDA

channels, and to a lesser extent via the voltage-
gated channels.

[46,47]

Fasoracetam modulates meta-

botropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) subclasses
that are (positively and negatively) coupled to the
G-protein receptor complex, thereby stimulating
(or inhibiting) adenylate cyclase or cyclic adeno-
sine monophosphate (cAMP) formation, which is
implicated in a variety of signal transduction
processes such as learning and memory. Its an-
tagonist role was most evident in mitigating
the deficits in learning and memory induced by
one of the most potent GABA

B

-mimetic drugs,

baclofen, in rats.

[48,49]

Furthermore, repeat dose

administration of fasoracetam upregulated GA-
BA

B

receptors and that was linked to its promis-

ing antidepressant action in rats.

[50]

Coluracetam

appears to function very differently, i.e. through
trafficking of high-affinity choline transporters

[51]

and enhancing choline uptake in hippocampal
synaptosomes, thus facilitating the synthesis, re-
lease and availability of acetylcholine.

[52]

The

inter-relationships between these diverse complex
processes would be challenging to dissect. These
distinct and overlapping mechanisms may trans-
late to additive, synergistic or antagonistic effects
if more than one of these drugs is administered at
a given time.

4. Pharmacology and Classification

For clarity in reviewing and analysing the

data, we have separated the lead compounds into
three subgroups. Subgroups 1 and 2 are based
partly on the similarity of their molecular struc-
tures and partly on their therapeutic attributes.
Subgroup 3 represents both old and new mole-
cular entities with more diverse structures and
unknown efficacies. Table III and figure 1 show
this classification, as well as key pharmacokinetic
properties for each compound. Major findings on
pharmacological properties and stages of devel-
opment for each subgroup are described in the
following sections.

4.1 Subgroup 1: Cognitive Enhancers

4.1.1 Piracetam

Piracetam was first approved in Europe in the

early 1970s for treatment of vertigo and age-
related disorders. It is a non-potent drug (table III
and figure 1); recent and ongoing trials have used
escalating or various high doses depending upon
the indication

[6,53]

(table IV). Adverse effects, al-

though rare, mild and transitory, include anxiety,
insomnia, drowsiness and agitation.

[4,53]

Effect on Memory, Cognition, Attention, Depression

In the past decade, more than 20 review arti-

cles have been published showing the results of
clinical trials and the use of piracetam in a variety
of neurological disorders. A meta-analysis of
19 double-blind placebo-controlled trials per-
formed between 1972 and 2001 on piracetam use
in age-related mental impairments confirmed
that individuals receiving piracetam improved by
60.9

% compared with 32.5% in placebo, with a

combined number needed to treat of 4.1, i.e. ap-
proximately four people had to receive piracetam
to benefit one individual.

[4]

Since then, several

294

Malykh & Sadaie

ª 2010 Adis Data Information BV. All rights reserved.

Drugs 2010; 70 (3)

Table IV. Piracetam in clinical development

a

Sponsor

/study site

Intent to treat

Study
design

No. of pts
(age in y)

Dosage

Trial
duration

Outcome
measures

Efficacy
summary (

%

improvement
rate [APIR])

Adverse
event

References

Piracetam

Medical University, Berlin,
Germany

Cognition

/memory

deficits after
bypass surgery

rdbpc

120

Bolus 12 g
preoperative
infusion

3 d

Syndrome
Kurztest and
Alzheimer’s
disease
assessment

46

– 22

None

54

Humboldt University, Germany

Cognition

/memory

deficits after
bypass surgery

rdbpc

64 (40

–80,

mean 63)

Bolus 12 g
preoperative
infusion

3 d

Short-term
memory and
attention tests

55

– 20

None

55

University of Targu, Romania;
University of Debrecen, Hungary

Cognition

/memory

deficits after
bypass surgery

rdbpc

98 (44

–65,

mean 56)

z

12

–24 g/d, IV

then PO

6 wk

Psychological
tests, cranial CT
scans

29

– 19

None

56

Russian State Medical University,
Moscow, Russia

Cognition

/memory

in cerebrovascular
disorders

Open-
label,
parallel

70 (45

–75,

mean 62)

(2)

-

1.2 g

/d, 2.4 g/d,

PO

8 wk

MMSE
Depression

13

– 5

62

– 20

Headache
(15.7

%)

57

Research Institute of
Pharmacology, Moscow, Russia

Cognition

/memory

in cerebrovascular
disorders and TBI

rac

53 (18

–60)

(2)

-

1.2 g

/d, PO

56 d

MMSE
CCSE

7

– 3

8

– 2

High blood
pressure
(18

%)

58

Russian State Medical University,
Moscow, Russia

Cognition

/memory

deficits (after TBI)

rpc

42 (12

–18)

(3)

-

1.2 g

/d, 2.4 g/d,

PO

1 mo

Memory and
coordination
tests

50

– 11

None

59

UCB Pharma, Belgium

Mild cognitive
impairment

rdbpc

675 (50

–89,

mean 68)

(3)

-

4.8 g

/d, 9.6 g/d,

PO

12 mo

Cognitive
scores, safety

None

None

60,61

McGill University, Montreal, QC,
Canada

Myoclonus
epilepsy

Open-
label

11 (17

–36,

mean 24.5)

3.2

–20 g/d, PO

18 mo

MII, seizure
frequency

30

– 13

Drowsiness

53

Continued next page

Piracetam

and

Related

Drugs

for

CNS

Disor

ders

295

ª

2010

Adis

Data

Infor

mation

BV
.

All
rights

reserved.

Drugs

2010;

70
(3)

Table IV. Contd

Sponsor

/study site

Intent to treat

Study
design

No. of pts
(age in y)

Dosage

Trial
duration

Outcome
measures

Efficacy
summary (

%

improvement
rate [APIR])

Adverse
event

References

Beersheva Mental Health Center,
Israel

Tardive dyskinesia

rdbpc
crossover

40 (24

–69,

mean 47)

(2)

-

4.8 g

/d

4 wk

Extrapyramidal
symptom rating

38

– 6

None

62,63

Marmara University, Turkey

Ataxia

Open-
label

8 (mean 43.4)

30

–60 g/d

infusion

14 d

ICARS (such as
posture and gait
tests)

29

– 19

None

64

Max-Plank-Institute, Dresden,
Germany

Aphasia

rpc

24 (mean 57)

(2)

-

2

· 2.4 g/d, PO

6 wk

Language
performance

20

– 8

None

65

NIDA, Bethesda, MD, USA;
University of Pennsylvania, PA,
USA

Cocaine-related
disorders

rdbpc

44

(2)

-

4.8 g

/d, PO

10 wk

Anxiety,
withdrawal
symptoms

None

None

66-68

Piracetam

+ cinnarizine

State Medical University, Moscow,
Russia

CFS after
encephalopathy
(MS and TBI)

Open-
label,
parallel

29 MS
21 non-MS

(2)

-

2.4 g

/d, PO

1 mo

Depression,
psychometric
questionnaires

25

– 8

15

– 10

Sleep
disturbance
(12

%)

69

encephalopathies
(20

–57)

Piracetam

+ risperidone

Tehran University, Iran

Autism

rdbpc

40 (3

–11)

200

–800 mg/d,

PO

10 wk

Psychometric
ABC-C
questionnaires

41

– 11

Morning
drowsiness

70

a

The information summarized here was derived partly from the data submitted to the ClinicalTrials.gov databank (accessed 1 May 2009) and partly from articles entered in PubMed
after the last meta-analysis in 2002.

[4]

To simplify presentations of the reported statistically significant data (test score numbers) for the efficacies, we calculated the total

differences between test treatments and controls from baselines, and summarized as approximate percentage composite mean values or attributable percentage improvement
rate.

[71]

‘None’ denotes that there was no increase in the frequency or severity of adverse effects at the highest dose tested, which refers to the no observable adverse effect level

dose.

ABC-C

= Aberrant Behavior Checklist-Community; APIR = attributable percentage improvement rate (see Appendix); CCSE = cognitive capacity screening examination;

CFS

= chronic fatigue syndrome; ICARS = International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale; IV = intravenous injection; MII = Motor Impairment Index; MMSE = Mini Mental State

Examination; MS

= multiple sclerosis; NIDA = National Institute on Drug Abuse; PO = oral; rac = randomized, active controlled; rdbpc = randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled;

rpc

= randomized, placebo-controlled; TBI = traumatic brain injury; › indicates escalating dose; z indicates escalating and de-escalating doses; (2)-, (3)- indicates parallel fixed

doses.

296

Malykh

&

Sadaie

ª

2010

Adis

Data

Infor

mation

BV
.

All
rights

reserved.

Drugs

2010;

70
(3)