Page 1 of 3 

To learn more about the Cole-Bishop Amendment or VTA 

please sign up at 

www.vaportechnolgy.org

 or email us at 

guidance@vaportechnology.org

 

VTA

 

GUIDANCE

 

 

I

NITIAL 

R

EACTIONS TO 

FDA’

D

EEMING 

R

EGULATION

 

May 5, 2016  

FDA’

D

EEMING 

R

EGULATION 

W

ENT 

F

ROM 

B

AD 

T

W

ORSE 

F

OR 

T

HE 

V

APOR 

I

NDUSTRY

THE COLE-BISHOP AMENDMENT NOW THE ONLY WAY TO SAVE VAPOR 

 

OUR INITIAL THOUGHTS 

Today,  the  FDA  released  its  final  Deeming  Regulation  (the   “Deeming”)   sweeping  all  vapor  devices  and  liquids  made, 
derived from, or used with tobacco under its regulatory authority by deeming them to be tobacco products.   
 
The Deeming (including preamble) is 499 pages long and is accompanied by a Final Rule regarding User Fees and four FDA 
“guidance”  documents.    We  have  conducted  a cursory review and want to share some of our initial thoughts.  We will 
provide more detailed, expert analysis soon.    
 
It  is  clear  that  the  FDA  essentially  ignored  all  industry  comments  giving  little  consideration  to  the  advances  in  vapor 
technology,  the   industry’s  survival  as a whole,  or  the broader  objective  of advancing public  health.    Instead, the FDA 
asserted that its new rules were designed to protect youth, by declaring that retailers no longer will be allowed to sell to 
those under 18.  The FDA failed to mention that virtually every state already bans sales to minors.  In addition, the FDA 
proclaimed that its new rules will implement child resistant packaging but failed to mention that this too is already federal 
law.  In fact, the Deeming will have little impact on protecting youth.   
 
The Deeming now thrusts a debilitating amount of paperwork equally upon every vapor company regardless of size.  The 
Deeming creates a remarkably unfair system in which our new game-changing technologies are being treated worse than 
all forms of combustible tobacco products.  
 
For these reasons, we must unite – both industry and consumers – to save our industry, adult consumer choice and the 
right to vape.    Today’s  action  by  the  FDA  makes passing the Cole-Bishop Amendment all the more urgent and imperative.  
In short, the Cole-Bishop Amendment is our only viable path to survival.   
 

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE DEEMING 

Here  are  answers to just some  of the questions  that we have  been  fielding  today  which  highlight  what the  Deeming 
contains and the scope of products covered. 
 
When Does the Deeming Go Into Effect?  The  Deeming  will  be  “officially”  published  on  May  10,  2016.    The  regulations 
will be effective 90 days thereafter on August 8, 2016 (“Effective  Date”).  

 

What Happens on August 8, 2016?  Any product that you do not have on the market by August 8, 2016, cannot be brought 
to market without prior FDA approval (i.e., filing an application that ultimately receives an FDA marketing order).  

 

What About Products On the Market Now or Before August 8, 2016?  The FDA says you have three options:  

(1) file a Premarket Tobacco Application (PMTA) within 24 months of the Effective Date;  
(2) file a Substantial Equivalence Application (SE) within 18 month of the Effective Date; or  
(3) file Substantial Equivalence exemption request within 12 months of the Effective Date.   

However, as discussed below, these are false choices for the vast majority of the industry. 

 

What About the Predicate Date?  The FDA ignored calls to change the predicate date, which remains February 15, 2007

  FDA admitted that it has identified only ONE e-product that might serve as a predicate for an SE application. 

   

 

 

Page 2 of 3 

To learn more about the Cole-Bishop Amendment or VTA 

please sign up at 

www.vaportechnolgy.org

 or email us at 

guidance@vaportechnology.org

 

VTA

 

GUIDANCE

 

 

I

NITIAL 

R

EACTIONS TO 

FDA’

D

EEMING 

R

EGULATION

 

May 5, 2016  

  This  “predicate”  is  not  publicly  available  for  use  by  companies  as  a  predicate  for  SE  purposes. Even if it were, a 

first generation e-cigar is likely so vastly different from currently marketed e-products that FDA is unlikely to issue 
an SE marketing order on such an application.  (Note:  To date, the FDA has applied the SE standard to require 
that the predicate be virtually identical to the SE product.) 

  FDA additionally implied that it would be reluctant to accept cross-product category comparisons.   
  As such, there is no apparent predicate for any electronic cigarette or vapor product. 
  And, therefore, the SE pathway and SE exemption are not available.  

 
Doesn’t  the  FDA’s  Moving  Timeline  Make  It  Easier?    No.  Even if filing a PMTA or SE application is economically feasible 
for vapor companies, which it is not, the moving timeline completely disadvantages vapor products.  

  The Deeming imposes strict requirements and an artificial deadline for FDA action that, given its track record, the 

agency is unlikely to meet. 

  Every application filed must be decided upon by FDA within 12 months after the respective filing deadline.  
  If FDA fails  to issue a marketing order by the end of  this 12 month  “Continued  Compliance  Period,” you will 

essentially have to pull your product from the market. 

  To provide context, the FDA is currently sitting on 3,500 provisional SE applications filed for currently marketed 

tobacco products over the last 5 years.   Also, the FDA is sitting on 2,000 new SE applications filed through FY2015 
for products that have not yet been allowed to go to market. 
   

What If I Only Sell A Device or Component?  The same rules apply to you whether you sell an open or closed system, a 
device, or component.    Here  is  the  FDA’s  “non-exhaustive  list”  of  components  and  parts  used  with  vapor  products: 

  e-liquids;  

  atomizers;  

  batteries (with or without variable 

voltage);  

  cartomizers (atomizer plus replaceable 

fluid-filled cartridge);  

  digital display/lights to adjust settings;  

  clearomisers;   

  tank systems; 

  flavors; and 

  vials that contain e-liquids;  

  programmable software. 

 
When Is A Vape Shop Not a Vape Shop? 
 If you own a vape shop and you either mix or combine product in your shop, you 
are no longer a vape shop; you are a manufacturer pursuant to the Deeming. 

What About Labels?  New labeling requirements will be imposed, including accurate nicotine content.  Note that the 
Deeming  states,  “No  State   or  local  laws   in  effect  at  the   close   of  the   public  comment  period  were   identified  that  FDA  
determined   would   be   preempted   by   this   final   rule.”  We  at  VTA  vehemently  oppose  this  interpretation  of  the  Family 
Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control  Act’s  preemption  clause. 

What About Sampling?  Sampling – even in vape shops – is banned. 

Is There Any Good News?  The only two bright spots, at this juncture of our review, is that vapor products will not be 
subject to user fees.  Also, the FDA clearly spoke about the fact that it will be implementing new regulations to extend the 
flavor ban from cigarettes to cigars but did not indicate that it would apply such a ban to vapor products. In fact, the FDA 
notes that the “availability  of  alternatives  to traditional tobacco flavors in some products (e.g., ENDS) may potentially help 
some  adult  users  who  are  attempting  to  transition  away  from  combusted  products.” 

   

 

 

Page 3 of 3 

To learn more about the Cole-Bishop Amendment or VTA 

please sign up at 

www.vaportechnolgy.org

 or email us at 

guidance@vaportechnology.org

 

VTA

 

GUIDANCE

 

 

I

NITIAL 

R

EACTIONS TO 

FDA’

D

EEMING 

R

EGULATION

 

May 5, 2016  

WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE? 

Fortunately,  we  already  have  the  Cole-Bishop  Amendment,  which  cleared  its  first  big  hurdle  in  Congress  last  month.   
During a mark-up of the Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration bill, Representatives Tom Cole (R-
OK)  and  Sanford  Bishop  (D-GA)  offered  a  bipartisan  approach  that  would  accomplish  the  goal  of  protecting  small 
businesses and preserving the industry, while setting the stage for commonsense regulations that will protect youth and 
ensure the safety of consumers.  This is exactly the type of legislative solution that we need.  Unlike  the  FDA’s  one-size-
fits-all approach, the Cole/Bishop approach seeks to regulate vapor products as the new technology they are, not as the 
tobacco products that they are not.  
 
The Cole-Bishop Amendment is the only immediate vehicle that can change the predicate date.   The former Cole Bill 
(HR2058) has been supplanted, and Rep. Cole has endorsed the new approach publicly.  

Given the comments made by the FDA and the anti-vaping groups, a stand-alone bill to only change the predicate date 
(i.e., HR 2058) has no chance of success.  

We  all  must  fight  to  keep  the  Cole-Bishop  Amendment  in  the  House  Appropriations  Bill if  small  and  mid-sized  vapor 
companies will ever have a chance to survive.  Join us in this fight!