Author’s Accepted Manuscript

Inhibition of alpha oscillations through serotonin 2A
receptor  activation  underlies  the  visual  effects  of
ayahuasca in humans

Marta  Valle,  Ana  Elda  Maqueda,  Mireia  Rabella,
Aina  Rodríguez-Pujadas,  Rosa  Maria  Antonijoan,
Sergio  Romero,  Joan  Francesc  Alonso,  Miquel
Àngel  Mañanas,  Steven  Barker,  Pablo  Friedlander
Msc, Amanda Feilding, Jordi Riba

PII:

S0924-977X(16)30010-4

DOI:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.euroneuro.2016.03.012

Reference:

NEUPSY11240

To appear in:

European Neuropsychopharmacology

Received date: 2 August 2015
Revised date:

2 March 2016

Accepted date: 19 March 2016

Cite  this  article  as:  Marta  Valle,  Ana  Elda  Maqueda,  Mireia  Rabella,  Aina
Rodríguez-Pujadas,  Rosa  Maria  Antonijoan,  Sergio  Romero,  Joan  Francesc
Alonso, Miquel Àngel Mañanas, Steven Barker, Pablo Friedlander Msc, Amanda
Feilding  and  Jordi  Riba,  Inhibition  of  alpha  oscillations  through  serotonin  2A
receptor activation underlies the visual effects of ayahuasca in humans, 

European

Neuropsychopharmacology, 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.euroneuro.2016.03.012

This  is  a  PDF  file  of  an  unedited  manuscript  that  has  been  accepted  for
publication. As a service to our customers we are providing this early version of
the  manuscript.  The  manuscript  will  undergo  copyediting,  typesetting,  and
review of the resulting galley proof before it is published in its final citable form.
Please  note  that  during  the  production  process  errors  may  be  discovered  which
could affect the content, and all legal disclaimers that apply to the journal pertain.

www.elsevier.com/locate/euroneuro

 

Inhibition of alpha oscillations through serotonin 2A receptor 

activation underlies the visual effects of ayahuasca in humans 

Ketanserin and ayahuasca 

Marta Valle PhD

1,2,3,4

, Ana Elda Maqueda MSc

3,5

, Mireia Rabella MSc

3,6

, Aina 

Rodríguez-Pujadas PhD

5

, Rosa Maria Antonijoan PhD

,2,3,4

, Sergio Romero PhD

7,8

,  Joan 

Francesc Alonso PhD

7,8,9

,  Miquel Àngel Mañanas PhD

7,8,9

,  Steven Barker PhD

10

Pablo Friedlander Msc

11

, Amanda Feilding MSc

11

, Jordi Riba PhD

2,3,4,5 

 

Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Modelling and Simulation, IIB Sant Pau. Sant 

Antoni María Claret, 167, 08025 Barcelona, Spain. 

2

Centre d’Investigació de Medicaments, Servei de Farmacologia Clínica, Hospital de la 

Santa Creu i Sant Pau. Sant Antoni María Claret, 167, 08025, Barcelona, Spain.  

3

Department  of  Pharmacology  and  Therapeutics,  Universitat  Autònoma  de  Barcelona 

(UAB), Barcelona, Spain. 

4

Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental, CIBERSAM, Spain. 

5

Human Neuropsychopharmacology Group. Sant Pau Institute of Biomedical Research 

(IIB-Sant Pau). SantAntoni María Claret, 167. 08025, Barcelona, Spain.  

6

Servei  de  Psiquiatria,  Hospital  de  la  Santa  Creu  i  Sant  Pau.  SantAntoniMaría  Claret, 

167. 08025, Barcelona, Spain.  

7

Biomedical  Engineering  Research  Centre  (CREB),  Department  of  Automatic  Control 

(ESAII), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Barcelona, Spain. 

8

CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Spain. 

9

Barcelona  College  of  Industrial  Engineering  (EUETIB),  UniversitatPolitècnica  de 

Catalunya (UPC), Barcelona08028, Spain. 

10

Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, 

Louisiana State University, Skip Bertman Drive at River Road, Baton Rouge, LA 

70803, USA.

 

11

The Beckley Foundation, Beckley Park, Oxford OX3 9SY, United Kingdom 

 

Correspondence  to:  Jordi  Riba.  Human  Neuropsychopharmacology  Group,  IIB-Sant 

Pau. Sant Antoni María Claret, 167.08025, Barcelona, Spain. Phone: +34 93 556 5518. 

Fax: +34 93 553 7855. Email: jriba@santpau.cat 

 

Abstract 

Ayahuasca is an Amazonian psychotropic plant tea typically obtained from two 

plants,  Banisteriopsis  caapi  and  Psychotria viridis.  It  contains the psychedelic 5-HT

2A 

and  sigma-1  agonist  N,N-dimethyltryptamine  (DMT)  plus  β-carboline  alkaloids  with 

monoamine-oxidase (MAO)-inhibiting properties. Although the psychoactive effects of 

ayahuasca have commonly been attributed solely to agonism at the 5-HT

2A 

receptor, the 

molecular target of classical psychedelics, this has not been tested experimentally. Here 

we  wished  to  study  the  contribution  of  the  5-HT

2A 

receptor  to  the  neurophysiological 

and psychological effects of ayahuasca in humans. We measured drug-induced changes 

in  spontaneous  brain  oscillations  and  subjective  effects  in  a  double-blind  randomized 

placebo-controlled  study  involving  the  oral  administration  of  ayahuasca  (0.75  mg 

DMT/kg body weight) and the 5-HT

2A 

antagonist ketanserin (40 mg). Twelve healthy, 

experienced psychedelic users (5 females) participated in four experimental sessions in 

which 

they 

received 

the 

following 

drug 

combinations: 

placebo+placebo, 

placebo+ayahuasca, ketanserin+placebo and ketanserin+ayahuasca. Ayahuasca induced 

EEG power decreases in the delta, theta and alpha frequency bands. Current density in 

alpha-band oscillations in parietal and occipital cortex was inversely correlated with the 

intensity  of  visual  imagery  induced  by  ayahuasca.  Pretreatment  with  ketanserin 

inhibited  neurophysiological  modifications,  reduced  the  correlation  between  alpha  and 

visual effects, and attenuated the intensity of the subjective experience. These findings 

suggest  that  despite  the  chemical  complexity  of  ayahuasca,  5-HT

2A

  activation  plays  a 

key role in the neurophysiological and visual effects of ayahuasca in humans. 

 

Key  words:  Ayahuasca,  serotonin-

2A

  receptor,  ketanserin,  subjective  effects, 

neurophysiological effects, human  

 

Introduction 

Ayahuasca  is  a  psychoactive  plant  tea  used  traditionally  by  the  indigenous 

peoples of the Upper Amazon (Schultes, 1980) and in more recent times by healers and 

members  of  religious  syncretic  groups  (Tupper,  2008).  This  tea  is  receiving  increased 

attention from the general public and biomedical researchers (Frood, 2015). It has been 

used to help treat addiction (Fernández et al., 2014), and recent open-label studies have 

shown  preliminary  evidence  of  rapid  and  lasting  antidepressant  effects  after  a  single 

dose (Osório et al., 2015; Sanches et al., 2015). 

Although  there  are  many  variations  in  the  preparation  of  the  tea,  the  common 

ingredient  is  the  malpighiaceous  vine  Banisteriopsis  caapi.  This  plant  is  rich  in  β-

carboline  alkaloids,  mainly  harmine,  harmaline  and  tetrahydroharmine  (THH)  (Riba, 

2003). These alkaloids show monoamine-oxidase inhibiting properties  (N S Buckholtz 

and Boggan, 1977), while THH is also a serotonin reuptake inhibitor (N. S. Buckholtz 

and Boggan, 1977). In addition to B. caapi, other admixture plants are frequently used 

in the preparation of ayahuasca. One of the most common in the context of modern use 

is  Psychotria  viridis.  The  leaves  of  this  plant  are  rich  in  the  psychedelic  indole  N,N-

dimethyltryptamine or DMT (Riba, 2003). 

DMT  is  structurally  related  to  the  neurotransmitter  serotonin  (5-

hydroxytryptamine;  5-HT)  and  shows  agonist  activity  at  the  5-HT

2A 

and  5-HT

1A

 

receptors. DMT also  acts  as  an agonist at  the trace amine associated receptor (TAAR) 

(Bunzow et al., 2001) and it is a substrate of the serotonin and the vesicle monoamine 

transporters  (Cozzi  et  al.,  2009).  It  has  been  suggested  that  using  these  uptake 

mechanisms, intracellular concentrations could reach higher values than in plasma and 

interact  with  the  intracellular  sigma-1  receptor  (Fontanilla  et  al.,  2009).  This  receptor 

modulates the activity of many other proteins, conferring stability against cellular stress, 

and promoting brain plasticity (Chu and Ruoho, 2016; Tsai et al., 2009).  

 

When administered to humans parenterally, DMT induces intense modifications 

of  the  ordinary  state  of  awareness  with  intense  visual  effects,  but  it  is  devoid  of 

psychoactivity  when  taken  orally  (Riba  et  al.,  2015)  due  to  degradation  by  MAO 

(Suzuki  et  al.,  1981),  and  cytochrome-dependent  mechanisms  (Riba  et  al.,  2015).  The 

presence  of  the  MAO-inhibiting  β-carbolines  in  ayahuasca  prevents  is  enzymatic 

degradation and allows its oral bioavailability (Riba et al., 2003a). 

In  previous  studies  by  our  group,  we  found  ayahuasca  to  induce  a  pattern  of 

psychedelic effects with a slower onset and longer duration than those induced by DMT 

(Dos  Santos  et  al.,  2011;  Riba  et  al.,  2003a,  2001b).  Neurophysiologically,  ayahuasca 

induces broad-band power decreases in spontaneous electrical brain oscillations (Riba et 

al.,  2002a)  and  associated  reductions  in  intracerebral  current  source  density  (CSD)  in 

certain  brain  areas  (Riba  et  al.,  2004).  These  reductions  are  particularly  strong  for 

oscillations in the alpha band of the EEG, with CSD reductions over the posterior visual 

cortex, an effect thought to reflect increased cortical excitability (Romei et al., 2008b). 

Analogous  findings  in  the  range  of  the  alpha  band  have  also  been  observed  using 

magnetoencephalography  and  the  psychedelic  and  serotonin-

2A

  receptor  agonist 

psilocybin (Muthukumaraswamy et al., 2013). 

The aim of this study was to assess the contribution of serotonin-

2A

  receptor to 

the  neurophysiological  and  psychological  effects  of  ayahuasca.  We  postulated  that 

despite  the  combination  of  various  pharmacological  mechanisms  in  ayahuasca,  the 

general psychedelic effects and decreases in current density depend on activation of the 

5-HT

2A

 receptor. To test this hypothesis, we studied the interaction of a medium dose of 

ayahuasca (Riba et al., 2001b) and ketanserin, a 5-HT

2A

 receptor antagonist, in a group 

of experienced psychedelic users in a laboratory setting.  

 

 

 

Experimental Procedures  

Participants  

 

For  ethical  reasons,  we  only  recruited  individuals  with  prior  experience  with 

psychedelics.  We  wanted  to  avoid  introducing  drug-naive  individuals  to  psychedelics, 

and  to  make  sure  that  volunteers  would  be  familiar  with  the  modified  state  of 

consciousness  induced  by  these  drugs.  We  therefore  contacted  psychedelic  drug  users 

and  informed  them  about  the  goals  of  the  study,  the  nature  of  ayahuasca,  its 

psychological  effects,  and  the  potential  adverse  effects  described  in  the  literature  for 

psychedelics. We recruited a group of 12 healthy volunteers (5 females, 7 males) with 

previous experience with psychedelic drugs (10 times or more). Despite their experience 

with  psychoactive  substances,  no  participant  had  a  current  or  previous  DSM/ICD-10 

diagnosis of drug dependence. 

 

The volunteers had a mean age of 35 years (26-43). Their past experience with 

psychedelic  drugs  mainly  involved    LSD  (11/12),  Psilocybe  mushrooms  (11/12)  and 

ayahuasca  (8/12).  Nine  of  the  participants  also  had  experience  with  ketamine,  six  had 

used  2C-B,  five  had  smoked  Salvia  divinorum,  four  had  taken  mescaline-containing 

cacti such as peyote or San Pedro, and two had smoked dimethyltryptamine. At the time 

of the study, eight were using cannabis sporadically (1-2 cigarettes per week). Only four 

were  currently  tobacco  smokers  and  eleven  consumed  alcohol  in  moderate  amounts, 

from one or two beers or glasses of wine per day to one per month.  

Prior to participation, all volunteers underwent a complete medical examination 

that included medical history, physical examination, ECG, and standard laboratory tests, 

to  confirm  good  health.  Exclusion  criteria  included  a  current  or  past  history  of 

psychiatric  disorders,  alcohol  or  other  substance  use  disorders,  evidence  of  significant 

illness, and pregnancy. The study was conducted in accordance with the Declaration of 

Helsinki and subsequent amendments concerning research in humans and was approved 

 

by  the  Sant  Pau  Hospital  Ethics  Committee  and  the  Spanish  Ministry  of  Health.  All 

volunteers gave their written informed consent to participate. 

 

Drugs 

 

Ayahuasca was  administered in freeze-dried encapsulated form.  The  ayahuasca 

batch used in the study was analyzed using a previously described method using liquid 

cromatography-electrospray  ionization-tandem  mass  spectrometry  (McIlhenny  et  al., 

2009).  The  analysis  showed  that  ayahuasca  contained  the  following  alkaloid 

concentrations in mg per gram of freeze-dried material: 6.51 DMT, 13.14 harmine, 1.35 

harmaline  and  11.55  THH.    The  final  dose  was  calculated  individually  for  each 

participant, so that they received the equivalent of 0.75 mg DMT/kg body weight. The 

dose  chosen  is  of  medium  intensity  and  was  selected  based  on  data  from  previous 

studies  where it showed robust psychological  and physiological  effects  (Dos  Santos  et 

al., 2012; Riba et al., 2001b).  Given the alkaloid proportions present in the freeze-dried 

material,  at  the  0.75  mg/kg  DMT  dose,  participants  also  ingested  1.51  mg/kg  of 

harmine, 0.16 mg/kg of harmaline and 1.33 mg/kg of THH. 

 

Ketanserin  was  administered  as  the  trademark  drug  Ketensin  (ketanserin 

tartrate), at the dose of 40 mg, and placebo capsules contained lactose. 

 

Study design and drug administration 

 

The  study  was  conducted  according  to  a  double-blind,  randomized,  balanced, 

crossover  design.  It  involved  four  experimental  sessions  one  week  apart  each.  Two 

weeks  prior  to  the  first  experimental  session  and  throughout  the  study,  participants 

abstained  from  any  psychoactive  drugs  and  medications.  Urine  was  collected  for  drug 

analysis  on  each  experimental  day.  Participants  tested  negative  for  alcohol,  cannabis, 

amphetamines,  benzodiazepines,  opiates  and  cocaine.  In  each  session,  participants 

 

received an initial treatment that could be placebo (lactose capsule) or 40 mg ketanserin. 

One  hour  later,  they  were  administered  a  second  placebo  or  encapsulated  freeze-dried 

ayahuasca. Thus, on each experimental day, participants received one of four different 

treatment  combinations: placebo+placebo, placebo+ayahuasca, ketanserin+placebo  and 

ketanserin+ayahuasca. 

 

Participants  remained  in  the  laboratory  for  8  hours  after  which  they  were 

discharged home. During the first four hours they remained seated in a reclining chair in 

a  sound-attenuated  and  dimly  lit  room.  EEG  recordings  were  conducted  before  the 

administration  of  the  first  treatment  (placebo  or  ketanserin).  Ninety  minutes  after 

administration  of  the  second  treatment  (ayahuasca  or  placebo),  when  the  peak 

ayahuasca  effects  were  expected,  a  second  EEG  recording  was  obtained.  Four  hours 

after  administration  of  the  second  treatment,  when  most  of  the  subjective  effects  of 

ayahuasca  had  disappeared,  the  volunteers  were  allowed  to  leave  the  room  and  were 

asked to answer the subjective effects questionnaires. 

 

Data collection 

EEG recording and processing 

 

Three-minute EEG recordings with eyes closed were obtained from 19 standard 

scalp  locations  (Fp1/2,  F3/4,  Fz,  F7/8,  C3/4,  Cz,  T3/4,  T5/6,  P3/4,  Pz  and  O1/2). 

Recordings  were  obtained  using  a  BrainAmp  amplifier  (Brain  Products  GmbH, 

Gilching,  Germany)  before  the  first  treatment  (baseline)  and  90  minutes  after 

administration of the second treatment. Signals were referenced to the averaged mastoid 

electrodes, and vertical and horizontal electrooculograms (EOG) were also obtained for 

artifact minimization and removal. Signals were analogically band-pass filtered between 

0.1 and 45 Hz, digitized with a frequency of 250 Hz.  

 

 

 

EEG artifact minimization and removal was performed according to  a two-step 

procedure before calculating the parameters. First,  an ocular artifact minimization step 

was implemented using a previously described method based on blind source separation 

or BSS (Alonso et al., 2010; Romero et al., 2008). The continuous EEG recording was 

then segmented into 5 second epochs. These segments were automatically analyzed for 

saturation, muscular and movement artifacts using the procedure described by Anderer 

and colleagues (Anderer et al., 1992). 

 

After computing the two-step artifact preprocessing procedure, spectral analysis 

was  performed  for  all  EEG  channels.  Power  spectral  density  (PSD)  functions  were 

calculated  from  artifact-free  5  second  epochs  by  means  of  a  periodogram  using  a 

Hanning  window,  and  averaged.  Averaged  PSD  functions  for  each  experimental 

situation were quantified into absolute powers  in the following frequency bands: delta 

(0.5–3.5 Hz), theta (3.5–7.5 Hz), alpha (7.5-13 Hz), and beta (13-35 Hz). Additionally, 

frequency  variability  was  measured  calculating  the  deviation  of  the  center-of-gravity 

frequency or centroid of the total activity (0.5-35 Hz). 

 

Intracerebral current density calculation 

 

The Standardized LORETA (sLORETA) software (Pascual-Marqui et al., 1994) 

was  used  to  estimate  the  three-dimensional  intracerebral  current  density  distribution 

from the voltage values recorded at the scalp. sLORETA estimates a particular solution 

of  the  non-unique  EEG  inverse  solution  restricted  to  6239  cortical  grey  matter  voxels 

with  a  spatial  resolution  of  0.125  cm

according  to  a  digitized  head  model  from 

Montreal  Neurological  Institute  (Pasqual-Marqui,  2002).  The  current  density  values 

were estimated based on the EEG cross-spectral matrix and then squared for each voxel 

in the classical frequency bands. 

 

 

Subjective effect measures  

The psychological effects elicited by the administered treatments were measured 

using  a  battery  of  questionnaires  on  subjective  effects:  the  Hallucinogen  Rating  Scale 

(HRS),  the  Addiction  Research  Center  Inventory  (ARCI),  the  Altered  States  of 

Consciousness Questionnaire (APZ), and a battery of self-administered visual analogue 

scales (VAS).   

 

The Hallucinogen Rating Scale (HRS), developed by Strassman and colleagues 

(Strassman  et  al.,  1994),  includes  71  items  grouped  in  six  subscales:  Somaesthesia

reflecting  somatic  effects;  Affect,  measuring  emotional  and  affective  responses; 

Perception, measuring visual, auditory, gustatory, and olfactory experiences; Cognition

describing  modifications  in  thought  processes  or  content;  Volition,  indicating  the 

volunteer's capacity to willfully interact with his/her “self” and/or the environment; and 

Intensity, which reflects  the strength of the overall experience. The range of scores for 

all scales is 0-4. A validated Spanish version was administered (Riba et al., 2001a). 

 

The Addiction Research Center Inventory (ARCI) (Martin et al., 1971) includes  

49  items  distributed  in  five  scales  or  groups:  the  morphine-benzedrine  group  (MBG) 

that  measures  euphoria;  the  pentobarbital-chlorpromazine-alcohol  group  (PCAG),  that 

measures sedation; the lysergic acid diethylamide scale (LSD), that measures  somatic-

dysphoric  effects;  the  benzedrine  group  (BG)  that  measures  subjectively  experienced 

intellectual efficiency; and the amphetamine scale  (A), which is sensitive to stimulants. 

The range of scores is 0-16 for MBG, -4 to 11 for PCAG, -4 to 10 for LSD, -4 to 9 for 

BG, and 0-11 for A. A validated Spanish version was administered (Lamas et al., 1994). 

 

The  Altered  States  of  Consciousness  questionnaire  (“Aussergewöhnliche 

Psychische  Zustände”,  APZ)  (Dittrich,  1998)  is  composed  of    72  items  distributed  in 

three  subscales:  Oceanic  Boundlessness  (“Ozeanische  Selbst-entgrenzung”,  OSE),  to 

measure  changes  in  the  sense  of  time,  derealization  and  depersonalization;  Dread  of