Melatonin prevents abnormal mitochondrial dynamics resulting
from the neurotoxicity of cadmium by blocking calcium-dependent
translocation of Drp1 to the mitochondria

Abstract: Cadmium (Cd) is a persistent environmental toxin and occupational
pollutant that is considered to be a potential risk factor in the development of
neurodegenerative diseases. Abnormal mitochondrial dynamics are
increasingly implicated in mitochondrial damage in various neurological
pathologies. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the disturbance
of mitochondrial dynamics contributed to Cd-induced neurotoxicity and
whether melatonin has any neuroprotective properties. After cortical neurons
were exposed to 10

lM cadmium chloride (CdCl

2

) for various periods (0, 3, 6,

12, and 24 hr), the morphology of their mitochondria significantly changed
from the normal tubular networks into punctuated structures within 3 hr.
Following this pronounced mitochondrial fragmentation, Cd treatment led to
signs of mitochondrial dysfunction, including excess reactive oxygen species
(ROS) production, decreased ATP content, and mitochondrial membrane
potential (

MΨm) loss. However, 1 mM melatonin pretreatment efficiently

attenuated the Cd-induced mitochondrial fragmentation, which improved the
turnover of mitochondrial function. In the brain tissues of rats that were
intraperitoneally given 1 mg/kg CdCl

2

for 7 days, melatonin also ameliorated

excessive mitochondrial fragmentation and mitochondrial damage in vivo.
Melatonin’s protective effects were attributed to its roles in preventing
cytosolic calcium ([Ca

2+

]

i

) overload, which blocked the recruitment of Drp1

from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria. Taken together, our results are the
first to demonstrate that abnormal mitochondrial dynamics is involved in
cadmium-induced neurotoxicity. Melatonin has significant pharmacological
potential in protecting against the neurotoxicity of Cd by blocking the
disbalance of mitochondrial fusion and fission.

Shangcheng Xu

1

, Huifeng Pi

1

,

Lei Zhang

1

, Nixian Zhang

1,2

,

YuMing Li

3

, Huiliang Zhang

4

,

Ju Tang

1

, Huijuan Li

1

, Min Feng

1

,

Ping Deng

1

, Pan Guo

1

, Li Tian

1

,

Jia Xie

1

, Mindi He

1

, Yonghui Lu

1

,

Min Zhong

1

, Yanwen Zhang

1

,

Wang Wang

4

, Russel J. Reiter

5

,

Zhengping Yu

1

and Zhou Zhou

1

1

Department of Occupational Health, Third

Military Medical University, Chongqing, China;

2

Cancer Institute of the People’s Liberation

Army, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Third
Military Medical University, Chongqing, China;

3

Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The

Second Affiliated Hospital of Third Military
Medical University, Chongqing, China;

4

Department of Anesthesiology and Pain

Medicine, Mitochondria and Metabolism Center,
University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA;

5

Department of Cellular and Structural Biology,

University of Texas Health Science Center at
San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA

Key words: cadmium, Drp1, melatonin,
mitochondrial dynamics, neurotoxicity

Address reprint requests to Shangcheng Xu,
PhD or Zhou Zhou, PhD, Department of
Occupational Health, Third Military Medical
University, No. 30 Gaotanyan Street, Shapingba
District, Chongqing 400038, China.
E-mails: xushangchengmito@163.com or
lunazhou00@163.com

Received October 18, 2015;
Accepted January 4, 2016.

Introduction

The dynamic nature of mitochondria has renewed our
appreciation of the physiological and pathological roles
of mitochondrial dysfunction in human health and dis-
eases [1

–3]. Mitochondrial dynamics with constant mito-

chondrial

fission

and

fusion

not

only

orchestrate

mitochondrial morphology and distribution, but also
determine the fundamental mitochondrial biological pro-
cesses and regulate mitochondrial quality control [2, 4, 5].
Moreover, the impairment of mitochondrial dynamics
greatly contributes to the development and progression of
various neurodegenerative diseases [6, 7]. Accumulating
clinical and experimental evidence indicates that continu-
ous mitochondrial fission without the balance of mito-
chondrial fusion always leads to excessive mitochondrial

fragmentation and mitochondrial damage that is critical
to induce neuronal death [8]. Among the series of mito-
chondrial dynamin-related GTPases, the pathological
roles of dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) in triggering
mitochondrial fission have been highlighted [9

–11]. It has

been reported that neurotoxins, such as beta-amyloid and
6-hydroxydopamine, impaired the balance of mitochon-
drial dynamics by upregulating Drp1 gene expression,
promoting the translocation of Drp1 to the mitochondria,
or regulating the post-translational modification of Drp1
[9, 12

–14].

Cadmium (Cd) is a common toxic environmental and

occupational pollutant with high neurotoxicity. Epidemio-
logical and clinical data have shown that Cd exposure
results in a variety of neurological symptoms, including
severe headaches, visuomotor dysfunction, peripheral neu-

291

J. Pineal Res. 2016; 60:291–302

Doi:10.1111/jpi.12310

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Journal of Pineal Research

Molecula

r,

Biological

,P

h

ysiological

 and

 Clinical

 Aspe

ct

of

 Mel

atoni

n

ropathy, learning disabilities and hyperactivity, olfactory
dysfunction [15

–18]. Acute Cd poisoning produces parkin-

sonism symptoms, and occupational exposure had a cause
and effect relationship with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
[16, 19]. However, the mechanisms underlying Cd-induced
neurotoxicity still remain unclear. Our recent study
showed that Cd-induced hepatotoxicity led to mitochon-
drial fragmentation which may have been Drp1 dependent
[20]. Predictably then, the impairment of mitochondrial
dynamics may be involved in the neurotoxicity of Cd.

Recent evidence indicates that melatonin exerts efficient

protection in reducing metal-induced toxicity [21]. As a
broad spectrum antioxidant [22

–24], melatonin has pleio-

tropic effects as well as neuroprotective properties [25

–27].

It is capable of rapidly crossing the blood

–brain barrier

and accumulating at high concentrations in nerve cells [28,
29]. Melatonin’s multiple contributions toward the mainte-
nance of mitochondrial homeostasis have made it become
an increasingly interesting pharmacological agent against
neurodegenerative diseases [30

–32]. Interestingly, recent

studies reveal that melatonin has the potential to rescue
the abnormal mitochondrial dynamics induced by the
mtDNA

T8993G

mutation

and

methamphetamines

[33

–35]. However, it still remains obscure how melatonin

prevents detrimental mitochondrial fission in pathological
conditions, and whether melatonin directly affects mito-
chondrial dynamics, as the beneficial roles of melatonin in
mitochondrial dynamics may not be the cause, but rather
the consequence of its protective effects in rescuing mito-
chondrial damage.

Based on the above analysis, the current study was

designed to investigate the following issues: (i) whether the
disturbance of mitochondrial dynamics contributes to Cd-
induced neurotoxicity, (ii) if so, whether melatonin has
direct benefical effects in remodeling the balance of mito-
chondrial dynamics, which contributes to attenuate mito-
chondrial damage; and (iii) how melatonin protects
against the impairment of mitochondrial dynamics during
the neurotoxicity of Cd.

Materials and methods

Cell culture and treatment

Primary cortical neurons were dissected from newborn
Sprague Dawley rats, as previously described [36]. All pro-
cedures were performed in strict accordance with the
guidelines of the Animal Care Committee of the Third
Military Medical University. The mature neurons were
exposed to 10

l

M

cadmium chloride (CdCl

2

) (Sigma, St

Louis, MO, USA) for various periods (0, 3, 6, 12, and
24 hr). The CdCl

2

was dissolved in distilled and deionized

water to produce a 10 m

M

stock solution, which was then

used to produce serial dilutions in the cell culture medium
before application. To detect the protective effects of mela-
tonin, the cortical neurons were pretreated with 1 m

M

melatonin (Sigma) for 2 hr prior to CdCl

2

exposure. Mela-

tonin (0.5M) was freshly dissolved in ethanol (ACS regent,
≥99.5%) and stored at 4°C. It was further diluted in the
culture medium before application.

Time-lapse confocal imaging and mitochondrial
morphology analyses

To observe the changes in the mitochondrial morphology
in the cortical neurons, the CdCl

2

-treated cells were incu-

bated

with

the

MitoTracker

Red

CMXRos

probe

(200 n

M

) (Invitrogen Corp., Carlsbad, CA, USA) for

30 min at 37

°C according to the manufacturer’s instruc-

tions. After being washed twice in cold PBS, the living
cells were visualized under a Leica TCS SP2 confocal laser
scanning microscope (TCS SP2, Germany) by excitation at
579 nm and by emission at

>599 nm.

For time-lapse confocal imaging, the cells were placed

in a well-equipped live imaging station with a constant
temperature of 37

°C, 95% humidity, and 5% CO

2

for the

duration of the experiment. Individual mitochondria were
tracked in real time, and images were acquired every
10 min for 3 hr, as previously described [13, 37].

For regular image acquisition, a series of single confo-

cal 2D images were captured and quantitatively analyzed
using the ImageJ software (NIH), as previously described
[38, 39]. The aspect ratio (AR; major axis/minor axis)
and form factor (FF; the reciprocal of circularity value)
were used to evaluate the mitochondrial fragmentation
(particles) of each individual mitochondrion. Lower
AR

and

FF

values

represent

more

mitochondrial

fragmentation.

Determination of the mitochondrial parameters

As previously described [36, 40], the oxidative stress in the
cortical neurons and rat brain tissues was determined
using a 2

0

,7

0

-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-

DA) probe and a lipid peroxidation MDA (malondialde-
hyde) assay kit (Beyotime, Shanghai, China), respectively.
ATP was measured with an ATP Determination Kit
(Invitrogen Corp.). The mitochondrial membrane poten-
tial (

MΨm) was detected in the cortical neurons with a

mitochondrial membrane potential assay kit with JC-1
(Invitrogen Corp). The cardiolipin content of the cortical
neurons was estimated by staining them with nonyl acri-
dine orange (NAO) (Invitrogen Corp), a high-affinity car-
diolipin dye. The cells were cultured with 5

l

M

NAO in

growth medium at 37

°C for 30 min. Representative

images of the cortical neurons were acquired with a con-
focal laser scanning microscope. The excitation/emission
fluorescence of NAO was measured at 490/540 nm. The
mtDNA copy number was assayed by quantitative real-
time PCR. As previously described [36, 40], the mtDNA
amplicon was generated from a cytochrome c oxidase sub-
unit I (COX I) and the nuclear amplicon was generated
by amplifying the

b-actin segment. All experiments were

repeated five times.

Cell viability assay

Cell viability was analyzed using a Cell Counting Kit-8
(CCK-8)

(Dojindo

Laboratories,

Kumamoto,

Japan)

according to the manufacturer’s protocol as previously
described [36].

292

Xu et al.

Animal exposure

Twenty-four adult (8 wk old, 180

–220 g) male Sprague

Dawley (SD) rats were purchased from the Experimental
Animal Center at the Third Military Medical University
(Chongqing, China). The rats were housed at 25

°C under

standard conditions with a 12-hr light

–dark cycle and a

constant temperature. For the cadmium exposure, ran-
domly selected rats were intraperitoneally injected with

1 mg/kg of CdCl

2

for 7 days. CdCl

2

was dissolved in

0.9% physiological saline. To detect the neuroprotective
effects of melatonin against Cd, 10 mg/kg melatonin was
intraperitoneally administrated 2 hr before Cd injection
for 7 days. Melatonin was freshly prepared every time
before injection. An additional six randomly selected rats
were intraperitoneally injected with 0.9% physiological
saline to serve as controls. The rats were sacrificed by
decapitation 24 hr after the last injection and the brain tis-

Fig. 1

. CdCl

2

exposure triggered excessive mitochondrial fragmentation in cortical neurons. MitoTracker Red CMXRos (red) was

applied as the specific probe to label the mitochondrial morphology. The neuronal nucleus was labeled with Hoechst 33258 (0.5

lg/mL).

(A) Representative individual mitochondria were tracked in real time using time-lapse microscopy immediately after the cortical neurons
were exposed to 10

l

M

CdCl

2

. (B) The representative changes in the mitochondrial morphology were obtained by confocal microscopy of

the cortical neurons treated with 10

l

M

CdCl

2

for various periods (0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hr) and analyzed by ImageJ software. (C

–E) The

aspect ratio (AR) and form factor (FF) represent the ratio of the lengths of major and minor axis and the reciprocal of the circularity
value, respectively. Smaller AR and FF values indicate increased mitochondrial fragmentation. N

= 2415–4243 mitochondria. The values

are presented as the means

 S.E.M. (n = 6), *P < 0.05 versus the control group.

293

Mel prevents Cd-induced mt dynamics by acting Drp1

sues were harvested for analysis. All of the procedures
were approved by the Animal Care Committee of the
Third Military Medical University.

Transmission electron microscopy

The frozen brain tissues were rinsed in PBS and fixed
in 10% buffered formaldehyde for 72 hr before being
embedded in paraffin. The sections were deparaffinized,
rehydrated with a graded ethanol series, and quenched
with PBS three times. The brain sections were cut into
small pieces (1 mm

3

). After they were fixed in 2.5% glu-

taraldehyde and precooled to 4

°C, the brain sections

were postfixed with 2% osmium tetroxide in 0.1

M

PBS,

rinsed, dehydrated, and embedded. Random thin sec-
tions (0.05

lm) were cut using glass knives, and the sec-

tions were collected on naked copper mesh grids and
then stained with uranyl acetate and lead citrate. The
sections were viewed using a Hitachi-7500 electron
microscope (Hitachi-7500; Hitachi Company, Tokyo,
Japan).

Western blot analysis for mitochondrial dynamics-
related proteins

The cortical neurons were lysed with cell lysis buffer in the
presence of a cocktail of proteinase/phosphatase inhibitors
(Cell Signaling Technology, Inc., Danvers, MA, USA)
and centrifuged at 12 000 g for 30 min at 4

°C. The

extracted proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and
transferred to nitrocellulose membranes. The membranes
were blocked and incubated with various primary antibod-
ies overnight at 4

°C. We used the following primary anti-

bodies for the Western blots: anti-Drp1 (BD Biosciences,
Bedford, MA, USA), anti-fission 1 (Fis1) (Abcam, Cam-

bridge, MA, USA), anti-mitofusin 1 (Mfn1) (Abcam),
anti-mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) (Abcam), anti-optic atrophy 1
(OPA1) (Abcam), anti-phospho-Drp1 (serine 616) and
anti-phospho-Drp1 (serine 637) (Cell Signaling Technol-
ogy), and anti-actin (Santa Cruz Biotechnology, Santa
Cruz, CA, USA). The specific Odyssey secondary antibod-
ies used were IRDye800 donkey anti-rabbit and IRDye680
donkey anti-mouse IgG antibodies. The fluorescent signals
were detected and quantified using an Odyssey Infrared
Imaging System (LI-COR, Lincoln, NE, USA). For the
mitochondrial Drp1 protein level analysis, mitochondrial
extracts were isolated from primary cultured cortical neu-
rons with the Cell Mitochondria Isolation Kit as previ-
ously described [20]. Then, the mitochondrial Drp1
protein levels were determined as described above.

Measurement of the intracellular calcium ([Ca

2+

]

i

)

concentrations

To measure cytosolic calcium levels in intact cortical neu-
rons, the cells were loaded with 2

l

M

Fluo-4 AM (Invitro-

gen Corp) for 20 min at room temperature. To measure
the acute effect of Cd on [Ca

2+

]

i

change, the culture med-

ium was changed into the Hibernate A solution, and the
neurons were stimulated with CdCl

2

(10, 50 and 100

l

M

),

and a series of images were captured every 5 s by confocal
microscopy using a Zeiss LSM 780 microscope. To mea-
sure the chronic effects of Cd on [Ca

2+

]

i

, cortical neurons

were exposed to 10

l

M

CdCl

2

for 12 hr, briefly washed

with HBSS solution without Ca

2+

and Mg

2+

, and then

loaded with an HBSS solution containing 2

l

M

Fluo-4

AM at 37

°C for 30 min in the dark. Representative images

of the cortical neurons were captured with a TCS SP2 con-
focal laser scanning microscope at excitation/emission
wavelengths of 480/525 nm.

Fig. 2

. CdCl

2

exposure induced mitochondrial dysfunction in the cortical neurons in a time-dependent manner. (A) The ROS production,

(B) ATP levels, (C) cardiolipin content, (D)

MΨm, and (E) cell viability were assayed after the cortical neurons were treated with 10 l

M

CdCl

2

for various periods (0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hr). The results are expressed as a percentage of the control, which was set to 100%. The

values are presented as the means

 S.E.M. (n = 5), *P < 0.05 versus the control group.

294

Xu et al.

Statistical analysis

All of the experimental data are expressed as the
means

 S.E.M., and each experiment was performed at

least three times. The data comparisons among the groups
were performed using a one-way ANOVA (Bonferroni’s
multiple comparison Test), and P

< 0.05 was considered

statistically significant.

Fig. 3

. Melatonin attenuated the CdCl

2

-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and mitochondrial dysfunction in cortical neurons. The

cortical neurons were pretreated with 1 m

M

melatonin for 2 hr before being exposed to 10

l

M

CdCl

2

for 12 hr. The beneficial effects of

melatonin on the mitochondrial morphology were tracked in real time using time-lapse microscopy (A) and detected by regular confocal
microscopy (B). (C

–E) Melatonin pretreatment improved the AR and FF values in the Cd-treated cortical neurons. N = 4929–7612 mito-

chondria. Melatonin prevented the ROS overproduction (F), ATP decline (G), cardiolipin reduction (H), and the cell viability decrease
(I). The results are expressed as a percentage of the control, which was set to 100%. The values in (C, D, F-I) are presented as the
means

 S.E.M. (n = 5), *P < 0.05 versus the control group, and

#

P

< 0.05 versus the CdCl

2

(10

l

M

) group.

295

Mel prevents Cd-induced mt dynamics by acting Drp1

Results

To explore the potential effects of Cd on mitochondrial
dynamics, time-lapse microscopy was applied to track the
changes in the mitochondrial morphology in real time.
The live imaging data showed that the addition of 10

l

M

CdCl

2

gradually altered the dynamics balance of the mito-

chondrial morphology. Importantly, as early as 3 hr after
Cd exposure, the morphology of the majority of the mito-
chondria shifted from their normally elongated tubular
structures into punctuated structures (Fig. 1A). This dra-
matic mitochondrial fragmentation lasted up to 24 hr and
was confirmed by time course analysis through confocal
imaging (Fig. 1B). Both the aspect ratio (AR) and form
factor (FF) values, which were used to quantify the mito-
chondrial fission/fusion in living cells, were markedly
decreased by 31% and 20% at 12 hr after Cd treatment,
respectively (Fig. 1C

–E). These results indicated that

CdCl

2

exposure damaged the balance of mitochondrial

fusion and fission, and induced pronounced mitochondrial
fragmentation in cortical neurons.

Along with the mitochondrial morphology experiment,

time course studies were carried out to examine the
adverse effects of Cd on mitochondrial function. As shown
in Fig. 2, CdCl

2

elevated ROS production to 1.6-fold of

that of the controls at 6 hr after exposure (Fig. 2A). Next,
the ATP levels and cardiolipin content were clearly
decreased by 40% and 44%, respectively, at 12 hr after
CdCl

2

exposure compared to those of controls (Fig. 2B,

C). Subsequently, the

MΨm dissipated to 65% of that of

control at 24 hr after CdCl

2

treatment (Fig. 2D). In com-

bination with this mitochondrial dysfunction, the cellular
viability of the CdCl

2

-treated cortical neurons showed a

time-dependent reduction and was eventually only 56% of
that of control (Fig. 2E). These results suggested that
mitochondrial dysfunction occurred later than the abnor-
mal mitochondrial dynamics, which probably preceded the
mitochondrial damage in the neurotoxicity of Cd in vitro.

To investigate the potential protective effects of mela-

tonin against Cd-induced mitochondrial fragmentation
and damage, the cortical neurons were pretreated with
1 m

M

melatonin 2 hr prior to CdCl

2

exposure. Time-lapse

analysis and confocal imaging indicated that the melatonin
pretreatment

efficiently

prevented

the

increase

in

punctuated mitochondria in the cortical neurons exposed
to 10

l

M

CdCl

2

for 12 hr (Fig. 3A,B). Accordingly, mela-

tonin improved the decrease in the AR and FF values
(Fig. 3C

–E). Following the normalization of mitochon-

drial dynamics in CdCl

2

-treated neurons, melatonin effi-

ciently attenuated mitochondrial and cellular damage,
including a reduction in ROS overproduction, increasing
ATP, cardiolipin contents, and improving cellular viability
(Fig. 3F

–I).

To further identify the beneficial roles of melatonin in

mitochondrial dynamics and function in vivo, the in vitro
findings were tested in an animal model by intraperi-
toneally injecting rats with 1 mg/kg CdCl

2

for 7 days. Rel-

ative to mitochondrial dynamics in the brain tissue as

Fig. 4

. Melatonin protected against mitochondrial fragmentation and mitochondrial dysfunction in the brain tissues of rats exposed to

CdCl

2

. (A). Representative mitochondrial morphology in the rat brain tissues detected by electron microscopy (EM). N

= Nucleus,

M

= mitochondria. (B) The MDA levels and (C) ATP contents in the rat brain tissues were measured using a commercial kit. (D) The

mtDNA copy number was detected by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. The amount of mtDNA was normalized to the internal con-
trol,

b-actin. The results are expressed as a percentage of the control, which was set to 100%. The values are presented as the

means

 S.E.M. (n = 5), *P < 0.05 versus the control group, and

#

P

< 0.05 versus the CdCl

2

(10

l

M

) group.

296

Xu et al.

reflected by mitochondrial morphology, electron micro-
scopy indicated that CdCl

2

exposure increased the number

of smaller mitochondria with fragmented and spotted
structures compared to the tubular mitochondrial net-
works in control group (Fig. 4A). In accordance with the
changes in mitochondrial morphology in CdCl

2

-treated

group, Cd disturbed mitochondrial function, as reflected
by the rise in MDA levels, and the reduction in ATP levels
and mtDNA copy number compared to the controls
(Fig. 4B

–D). However, melatonin pretreatment (10 mg/kg,

7 days) successfully attenuated the Cd-induced mitochon-
drial fragmentation, reduced the MDA levels, increased
the ATP levels, and maintained the mtDNA copy number
(Fig. 4A

–D). These findings indicated that melatonin also

had protective roles against mitochondrial fragmentation
and damage resulting from Cd neurotoxicity in vivo.

To explore the mechanism by which the mitochondrial

dynamics were impaired during Cd-induced neurotoxicity,
we determined whether melatonin affects the expression
pattern of the mitochondrial fission proteins (Drp1 and
Fis1) and fusion proteins (Mfn1, Mfn2, and Opa1) in
Cd-treated neurons. Western blot analysis indicated that
neither Cd exposure nor melatonin treatment altered the
expression pattern of these five dynamin-related GTPases

and the phosphorylation status of Drp1 (Fig. 5A

–E). As

Drp1 is the key regulator that mediates mitochondrial fis-
sion after translocating to the mitochondria and forming
spirals [12, 41], we further investigated the recruitment of
Drp1 to the mitochondria by detecting the protein levels
of Drp1 in mitochondria isolated from Cd-treated neu-
rons. The Western blot analysis demonstrated that the
amount of Drp1 recruited to the mitochondria increased
to 1.98-fold in Cd-treated neurons, while melatonin pre-
treatment efficiently prevented this translocation (Fig. 6A).
Furthermore, overexpressing the dominant-negative Drp1
mutant (Drp1 K38A) significantly blocked the excessive
mitochondrial fragmentation (Fig. 6B

–E), which was simi-

lar to the effects of melatonin. This result indicates that
melatonin exerted its protective effects on the mitochon-
drial dynamics through the Drp1 pathway.

Additionally, the inhibitory action of melatonin on the

recruitment of Drp1 to the mitochondria was related to
blocking the elevation of [Ca

2+

]

i

. As soon as CdCl

2

was

added into the culture medium, there was a significant rise
in [Ca

2+

]

i

levels that reached a peak roughly 10 s after Cd

treatment (Fig. 7A

–C). Moreover, Cd-induced increase in

[Ca

2+

]

i

was also detected at 12 hr after Cd treatment

(Fig. 7D). These results indicate that the increase in the

Fig. 5

. Cadmium and melatonin did not alter the expression of mitochondrial dynamin-related GTPases or the phosphorylation of Drp1.

Western blot analysis was used to detect the expression levels of the mitochondrial fission proteins (Drp1 and Fis1) (A) and mitochondrial
fusion proteins (Mfn1, Mfn2, and Opa1) (B) in the Cd-treated neurons. The ratios of the mitochondrial fission proteins (Drp1 and Fis1)
to the mitochondrial fusion proteins were quantified as shown in (C) and (D), respectively. Two well-known phosphorylation sites of
Drp1 (Ser 616 and Ser 637) were detected in the Cd-treated neurons. Melatonin treatment alone also had no effects on the expression of
the mitochondrial fission and fusion proteins or the phosphorylation of Drp1 at Ser616 and Ser637 (A

–E). b-actin (42 kDa) was chosen

as an internal standard for the amount of protein loaded for each sample. The data are representative of six independent experiments.
The results are expressed as the fold of the control, which was set to one. The values are expressed as the means

S.E.M.

297

Mel prevents Cd-induced mt dynamics by acting Drp1

[Ca

2+

]

i

was the initial step and lasted long enough to

induce abnormal mitochondrial dynamics in Cd-treated
neurons. To further confirm this, the specific [Ca

2+

]

i

chelator, BAPTA-AM, was applied to block the increase
in [Ca

2+

]

i

(Fig. 7B

–D), and it efficiently prevented the

translocation of Drp1 from the cytosolic to the mitochon-

Fig. 6

. Melatonin prevented the recruitment of Drp1 to the mitochondria in the Cd-treated cortical neurons. (A) Representative immuno-

blot and the quantification analysis of the protein levels of Drp1 (84 kDa) in mitochondria isolated from cortical neurons. COX IV (18
kDa) was chosen as an internal standard for the amount of protein loaded for each sample. (B

–E) Overexpressing Drp1 K38A attenuated

the excessive mitochondrial fragmentation in the Cd-treated cortical neurons. The values in (A, C, D) are presented as the
means

 S.E.M. (n = 3–5), *P < 0.05 versus the control group, and

#

P

< 0.05 versus the CdCl

2

(10

l

M

) group.

298

Xu et al.

dria (Fig. 7E), thereby reversing abnormal mitochondrial
dynamics (Fig. 7F). Notably, the melatonin pretreatment
had essentially the same effects in blocking the increase in
[Ca

2+

]

i

in response to either acute (Fig. 7B,C) or chronic

Cd exposure (Fig. 7D). Moreover, melatonin exerted
BAPTA-AM-like effects in preventing Drp1 translocation
and attenuating excessive mitochondrial fragmentation
(Fig. 7E,F).

Discussion

Considering that abnormal mitochondrial dynamics have
been highlighted in various pathological conditions of

the nervous system, studies that explore potential neuro-
protective agents to modulate the balance of mitochon-
drial fusion and fission have garnered much interest [1,
6, 8, 10, 11]. Herein, our study provides in vivo and
in vitro evidence that melatonin efficiently prevented the
detrimental shift from mitochondrial fusion to excessive
fission in Cd-treated cortical neurons, which preceded
mitochondrial

dysfunction

and

contributed

to

Cd-induced neurotoxicity. Mechanically, the beneficial
effects of melatonin in maintaining the balance of mito-
chondrial dynamics largely relied on its actions in block-
ing [Ca

2+

]

i

-dependent translocation of Drp1 from the

cytosol to the mitochondria (Fig. 8). To the best of our

Fig. 7

. The beneficial effects of melatonin on Drp1 were related to the increase in [Ca

2+

]

i

levels in cortical neuron. (A) The representative trace

shows the acute effect of Cd (10, 50, and 100

l

M

) in stimulating the rise in [Ca

2+

]

i

. Similar to the [Ca

2+

]

i

chelator, BAPTA-AM, melatonin effi-

ciently reduced the increased [Ca

2+

]

i

in the neurons after acute treatment of Cd, reflect by an increased [Ca

2+

]

i

trace (B) and greater [Ca

2+

]

i

peak (C). (D) In cortical neurons with 12 hr treatment with Cd, representative changes of [Ca

2+

]

i

showing melatonin efficiently reduced the

increase in [Ca

2+

]

i

. Similar to BAPTA-AM, melatonin blocked the recruitment of Drp1 to mitochondria (E) and the excessive mitochondrial

fragmentation (F) in Cd-treated cortical neurons. The values in (C-E) are presented as the means

 S.E.M. (n = 3–6), *P < 0.05 versus the

Control group, #p

< 0.05 versus the CdCl

2

(10 l

M

) group. In (F), *P

< 0.05 versus the CdCl

2

(10

l

M

) group.

299

Mel prevents Cd-induced mt dynamics by acting Drp1

knowledge, our study is the first to investigate the
neuroprotective effects of melatonin against Cd-induced
neurotoxicity, with a focus on reversing the abnormal
mitochondrial dynamics.

Cd induces significant neurotoxicity that is considered

to be a possible etiological factor in neurodegenerative
diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s dis-
ease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis [16, 19, 42].
However, its underlying mechanism of toxicity still
remains poorly understood. Recent evidence indicates
that

abnormal

mitochondrial

dynamics,

particularly

excessive mitochondrial fission, are increasingly believed
to be involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative
diseases [8, 10, 13, 14, 37]. Additionally, our recent
studies indicated that Cd-induced excessive mitochon-
drial fragmentation and induced overactivated mito-
phagy are components of its hepatotoxicity [20, 43].
Therefore, it is worth exploring whether Cd induces its
neurotoxicity effects by impairing mitochondrial dynam-
ics. Any disturbances in the mitochondrial dynamics
could be promptly reflected by changes in mitochondrial
morphology. In the present study, we found that Cd
exposure significantly altered the mitochondrial morphol-
ogy from their normally elongated tubular and filamen-
tous structures to small and spherical particles both
in vitro and in vivo. These results indicated that Cd
exposure led to abnormal mitochondrial dynamics dur-
ing Cd-mediated neurotoxicity.

The mitochondrial dynamics control mitochondrial

physiology by influencing the exchange of the mitochon-
drial content between individual mitochondria, through
mitochondrial recruitment to critical subcellular compart-

ments, mitochondrial communication with the cytosol,
and mitochondrial quality control [1, 5]. Accumulating
evidence indicates that disbalance of mitochondrial fusion
and fission provokes subsequent mitochondrial dysfunc-
tion, which leads to pathological outcomes including cell
death in the nervous system [6, 13, 14, 37]. In our present
study, mitochondrial fragmentation occurred at 3 hr after
Cd exposure, which is much earlier than mitochondrial
dysfunction, as reflected by the overproduction of ROS at
6 hr, the decline of ATP levels and cardiolipin content at
12 hr, and the

MΨm disruption at 24 hr. This strongly

supported the conclusion that abnormal mitochondrial
dynamics

precedes

mitochondrial

damage

during

Cd-induced neurotoxicity; these results are consistent with
previous studies that pointed to excessive mitochondrial
fission as the leading cause of neurological pathologies [12,
37, 44].

Importantly, melatonin possesses the ability to prevent

the abnormal mitochondrial dynamics, thereby rescuing
the Cd-induced mitochondrial damage and neurotoxicity.
The dynamic balance of mitochondrial fusion and fission
is delicately regulated by two opposing groups of large
dynamin-related GTPases [1, 5]. Previous studies indi-
cated that neurotoxins lead to excessive mitochondrial
fission by altering the expression patterns of mitochon-
drial dynamics-related proteins [45, 46]. However, nei-
ther Cd treatment nor melatonin administration changed
the levels of the mitochondrial fusion and fission pro-
teins in cortical neurons in our study. In contrast, mela-
tonin prevented the translocation of Drp1 from the
cytosol to punctuate spots on the mitochondrial surface,
which proved to be an essential step for Drp1 to medi-
ate mitochondrial fission [41, 47]. It suggests that in
Cd-treated neurons, the fission machinery is present and
can be activated through the recruitment of Drp1 to the
mitochondria, independent of de novo protein synthesis.
Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of melatonin on
Drp1 translocation largely depended on melatonin’s
roles in attenuating the increase in [Ca

2+

]

i

, similar to

Ca

2+

chelator BAPTA-AM. Although another study

showed an elevation of [Ca

2+

]

I

recruited Drp1 to the

mitochondria by activating the calcineurin-dependent
dephosphorylation of Drp1 Ser637 [41], we did not
observe any changes at this phosphorylation site or at
Drp Ser616 in the Cd-treated neurons. An unknown
post-translational modification mechanism might exist,
such as an unidentified phosphorylation site of Drp1,
which is involved in the melatonin-mediated regulation
of Drp1 translocation to the mitochondria in the Cd-
treated neurons.

Taken together, our study supported the hypothesis

that melatonin has beneficial roles in preventing the
abnormal mitochondrial dynamics by blocking [Ca

2+

]

i

-

dependent recruitment of Drp1 to the mitochondria.
Although mitochondrial dynamics determine multiple
mitochondrial functions, as a feedback or in some patho-
logical context, rescuing mitochondrial damage is also
helpful for promoting mitochondrial fusion and inhibit-
ing mitochondrial fission [48, 49]. In the neurotoxicity of
Cd, time course analysis demonstrated that melatonin
directly modulated abnormal mitochondrial dynamics

Fig. 8

. Schematic model of the protective effects of melatonin

against detrimental mitochondrial fission by blocking [Ca

2+

]

i

-

dependent recruitment of Drp1 to the mitochondria. The events
occurred in a specific sequence: first, Cd exposure stimulates an
increase in [Ca

2+

]

i

that are responsible for the translocation of

Drp1 to the mitochondria. After translocation to the mitochon-
dria, Drp1 triggers excessive mitochondrial fragmentation and
subsequently leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death.
Melatonin

pretreatment

prevented

abnormal

mitochondrial

dynamics by blocking the translocation of Drp1 to the mitochon-
dria, which was relied to the beneficial effects of melatonin in
reducing the increased [Ca

2+

]

i

. As a result, melatonin efficiently

protected mitochondrial function and cell viability against
Cd-induced

neurotoxicity.

Cd,

cadmium;

[Ca

2+

]

i

,

cytosolic

calcium; CL, cardiolipin.

300

Xu et al.