Fossil Free Strathclyde Report  

to the Strathclyde Pension Fund  

Committee and Board 

 

 

Review of SPF’s Energy portfolio:  

Risks, returns and opportunities 

 

 

 

 

 

Table of contents:  

 

Section I. Introduction

Section II. 

Investment in high­carbon companies – an increasingly risky investment

i.

Unburnable carbon and future resource exploration

ii.

Recent oil shock

 

Section III. 

Providing confidence to shift to low­carbon alternatives

Section IV. Building a more resilient Fund – Shifting capital to alternative investment

 

i.

Review of Ex­Fossil Fuel Indexes and Reinvestment Opportunities

ii.

Global Trends of Reinvestment in Renewables

iii.

Investment Opportunities in Infrastructure and Energy Efficient Buildings

10 

 

 

 

 

Section I. Introduction   

The members of Strathclyde Pension Committee are the trustees of its investments and are ultimately

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

legally responsible for the proper investment and safekeeping of these funds. With financial risks of

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

investing in fossil fuels becoming clearer every day, the managing body of Strathclyde Pension Fund has

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

the responsibility to fulfill its fiduciary duty to its members and to make prudent decisions regarding the

 

   

   

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

level of risk it exposes them to. 
 
Assessing the exposure of fossil fuel companies is essential to the long­term sustainability of any fund. By

 

 

   

 

 

   

   

 

 

   

 

   

acting promptly on its energy portfolio, the fund would benefit from acquired experience in fossil fuel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

assessment and low­carbon opportunities, preparing the way to insure that it meets its medium and

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

long­term liabilities and prevents potential future loss. 
 
This report intends to serve as an advisory document for the Strathclyde Pension Fund and its members,

 

 

   

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

evaluating financial risks and opportunities regarding the carbon­intensive assets and increasing exposure

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

of the fund. The research reviews the current volatility of the fossil fuel market in general and provides

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

specific assessment of SPF’s financial performance and reinvestment strategies. 
 

 

 

 

Section II. 

Investment in carbon­intensive companies – an increasingly risky investment

 

i. Unburnable carbon and further resource exploration 

In December 2015, at the Conference of the Parties (COP21) in Paris, 175 countries, including the UK,

 

 

   

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

committed themselves to limit the rise of global temperatures to 2°C. Such a limit corresponds to a

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

   

 

     

specific amount of carbon dioxide that can be released into the atmosphere. This creates a particular risk

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

in fossil fuel markets, referred to as the ‘carbon bubble’.   

As stated by Carbon Tracker Initiative, the 2°C limit has significant economic consequences, since it

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

influences the amount of fossil fuels that can be burnt. In order to stay under the internationally agreed

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

   

   

 

 

 

 

 

1

limit of 2°C, 60­80% of fossil fuel reserves, which contribute to the market value of fossil fuel companies,

   

 

   

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

are to be rendered ‘unburnable’. These reserves would thereby become ‘stranded assets’, which would

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

mean that current reserves are significantly overvalued, amounting to a ‘carbon bubble’. The carbon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

bubble renders the fossil fuel market vulnerable to increasing amounts of risks. 

In addition, fossil fuel investments are exposed to market forces and changing energy commodity prices.

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Energy innovation and competing low­carbon technologies, such as the advancement in energy efficiency,

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

 

battery storage and the deployment of cost­effective renewable energy technologies have the potential to

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

impact the future demand of fossil fuel.   

Consequently, financial analysts such as Mercer , HSBC and the Bank of England have acknowledged the

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

2

3

4

current and increasing exposure of the fossil fuel industry, pointing out the potential downward

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

revaluation of assets, leading to the loss of invested capital. Research conducted by Oxford University

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

demonstrated that

€6 billion have already been lost through stranded assets in gas plants in the years

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

 

leading up to 2013.   

5

Furthermore, fossil fuel companies

still direct a large portion of cash flows towards

CAPEX (capital

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

expenditure), i.e. to efforts of discovering new reserves. According to the Grantham Research Institute on

 

   

   

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

Climate Change, the sum spent on CAPEX in 2012 by the top 200 listed coal, oil and gas companies totalled

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

   

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

$674 billion. This was around five times larger than the returns through dividends to their shareholders,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

6

1

 James Leaton, 

Unburnable Carbon: Are the world’s financial markets carrying a carbon bubble?

 (London: Carbon Tracker 

Initiative, 2012), p.8, available at: 
http://www.carbontracker.org/wp­content/uploads/2014/09/Unburnable­Carbon­Full­rev2­1.pdf

, accessed 13 May 2016. 

2

 

Mercer, 

Investing in a Time of Climate Change 

(Mercer, 2015), available at: 

http://www.mercer.com/content/dam/mercer/attachments/global/investments/mercer­climate­change­report­2015.pdf, 
accessed 13 May 2016. 

3

 HSBC, 

Scoring the Climate Risk: G20 vulnerability increases

 (HSBC Bank plc: 24 Sept. 2013) available at: 

file:///M:/030214­scoring­climate­change­risk­2013.pdf , accessed 15 May 2016.  

4

 Bank of England, Mark Carney, Speech: Braking the Tragedy of the Horizon ­ climate change and financial stability (Lloyd’s 

of London: 29 September 2015), available at:  
http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/publications/Documents/speeches/2015/speech844.pdf, accessed 15 May 2015   

5

 Ben Caldecott and Jeremy McDaniels, 

Stranded generation assets: Implications for European 

capacity mechanisms, energy markets and climate policy 

(Oxford: Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment, 2014), 

available at: 
http://www.smithschool.ox.ac.uk/research­programmes/stranded­assets/Stranded%20Generation%20Assets%20­%20Wo
rking%20Paper%20­%20Final%20Version.pdf

 , accessed 13 May 2016. 

6

 James 

Leaton 

et al

., 

Unburnable Carbon 2013: Wasted capital and stranded assets

 (London: Carbon Tracker Initiative; 

Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment; London School of Economics, 2013), 

p. 16., 

a

vailable at: 

http://www.lse.ac.uk/GranthamInstitute/wp­content/uploads/2014/02/PB­unburnable­carbon­2013­wasted­capital­stran
ded­assets.pdf

 , accessed 13 May 2016. 

 

which equated to $126 billion

.

In addition, in a study of 37 oil companies, Citigroup estimated that as

 

   

 

 

 

     

   

 

 

 

 

 

   

much as 40% of the current investment cycle (around $1.4 billion) could have been directed to projects

   

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

that struggle to generate acceptable returns at oil prices below $75 a barrel.

 

7

In relation to international oil companies (IOCs), research conducted by Oxford University found that

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

under current practices, IOCs are failing investors through incomplete CAPEX reporting. The research

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

underlined that current disclosure ‘falls far short of being adequate for investors to make knowledgeable

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

   

 

 

and prudent assessments of the diversification strategies and practices being pursued by IOCs’(p.4). It also

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

   

 

demonstrated that poor project diversification can lead to a company being at further risk due to the fact

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

that ‘changing economic, political, social, and environmental conditions are not controllable by the

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

individual IOCs’(p.8). This leaves investors unable to know to what extent such companies are exposed to

 

 

 

 

 

   

   

 

 

 

 

 

   

the danger of stranded assets, leading to difficulties and uncertainties in assessing the financial risk. 

 

ii. Recent Oil Shock 

Beginning in June 2014, and driven by excess supply, the price of a barrel of oil dropped dramatically from

   

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

     

     

 

 

 

prior highs of above $100 to the low price level of under $30 in January 2016.

 

This has put a significant

 

   

 

   

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

 

 

   

 

9

pressure on the profit margins of the industry and led to the cancellation of a number of high profile

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

   

 

     

   

 

 

projects totaling $380 billion by January 2016, including Shell’s Arctic drilling and Statoil’s exploration off

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the coast of Greenland. The lower prices of oil has resulted in poor financial returns to the shareholders

 

   

 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

10

of fossil fuel companies.

For instance, between June 2014 and January 2016, the share price of Royal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

Dutch Shell declined by close to 50%.  Furthermore, research conducted by the Guardian has evaluated

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

that following the current crash of coal industry and the dramatic drop in oil prices, the Strathclyde

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

Pension Fund has already lost £26 million.  

12

 
A recent report by Chatham House compounds the problem faced by IOCs in a market dominated by

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

 

 

 

state­run companies. The state­run companies often have much lower production costs: $9 per barrel in

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

13

7

 Jason Channell 

et al

.,

 Energy Darwinism II: Why a Low Carbon Future Doesn’t Have to Cost the Earth

 (New York: Citigroup, 

2015), available at: 

http://climateobserver.org/wp­content/uploads/2015/09/Energy­Darwinism­Citi­GPS.pdf

, accessed 13 

May 2016. 

8

 Dane Rook and Ben Caldecott, 

Evaluating Capex Risk: New Metrics to Assess Extractive Industry Project Portfolios

(Oxford: Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment, 2015), available at: 
http://www.smithschool.ox.ac.uk/research­programmes/stranded­assets/Evaluating%20Capex%20Risk%20­%2010.02.15.
pdf

, accessed 13 May 2016. 

9

 EIA, ‘Petroleum and Other Liquids’, available at: 

https://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/PET_PRI_SPT_S1_D.htm

, accessed: 2016, 

April, refered to monthly data.  

10

 N.a., ‘The oil conundrum’, 

The Economist

, 23 January 2016, available at: 

http://www.economist.com/news/briefing/21688919­plunging­prices­have­neither­halted­oil­production­nor­stimulated­
surge­global­growth

, accessed 13 May 2016. 

11

 Yahoo Finance, ‘ROYAL DUTCH SHELL­B Stock.’, 2016, available at: https://uk.finance.yahoo.com/q/hp?s=RDSB.L, 

accessed 2016, April, refered to monthly historical price data. 

12

 Damian Carrington, ‘Millions wiped off UK local government pensions due to coal crash, analysis shows’, 

The Guardian

12 October 2015, available at: 
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/oct/12/millions­wiped­off­uk­local­government­pensions­due­to­coal­cr
ash­analysis­shows

, accessed 13 May 2016. 

13

 Paul Stevens, 

International Oil Companies: The Death of the Old Business Model

 (London: Chatham House, 2016), 

available at: 
https://www.chathamhouse.org/sites/files/chathamhouse/publications/research/2016­05­05­international­oil­companies
­stevens.pdf

, accessed 13 May 2016. 

 

Saudi Arabia compared to $23 in the US and $44 in the UK. The report shows that IOCs have only been

 

 

   

   

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14

able to access high cost regions in the last couple of decades. The reason why they are maintaining low

   

 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

prices now is due to a reliance on old fields, masking what the report claims as a failing business model.

 

   

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

 

 

 

However, most damning is that ‘the prognosis for the IOCs was already grim before governments became

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

serious about climate change and the oil price collapsed’. The current crisis will just exacerbate this

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

issue.  

 

 

 

14

 WSJ News Graphics, ‘Barrell Breakdown’, 

The Wall Street Journal

, 15 April 2016, available at: 

http://graphics.wsj.com/oil­barrel­breakdown/

, accessed 13 May 2016. 

15

 Stevens,

 International Oil Companies

 

Section III. 

Providing confidence to shift to low­carbon alternatives 

 

Growing awareness of the risks of the carbon bubble as well as the emergence of the Fossil Free

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

movement has sparked a shift among index managers to explore the possibility of offering indexes which

 

 

   

 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

exclude fossil fuel companies. Following this, research has been conducted that compares the historical

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

performance of all­world indexes with and with­out fossil fuel companies being excluded. 

 

Certain issues arise when using this as a measure of risk assessment for future investment decisions. First

 

 

 

 

 

     

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and foremost, past performance does not guarantee future results. Financial environments are constantly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

shifting; the recent collapse of oil and the poor performance of oil companies heavily tilted the results of

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

     

 

 

 

 

   

any analysis including the last 1½ years. While it is likely that the low oil price trend will continue, this

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

report will analyse different performance periods excluding and including the recent oil price drop.  

The MSCI ACWI excluding Fossil Fuel is a broad global index, which includes developed and emerging

 

 

 

 

 

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

markets as well as large and mid­cap stocks. With the inclusion of the recent oil crash, the ex Fossil Fuel

   

   

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

index saw annualised gross return over 6 years of 10.49% compared to the standard index’s 9.35% .

 

 

 

 

 

   

   

 

   

 

 

 

 

16

Moreover, MSCI has found that the ex Fossil Fuel index is slightly less volatile than the standard with a

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

volatility beta of .98, which runs counter to an often cited criticism of the Fossil Free movement that

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

divestment lowers portfolio diversity and thus increases instability (figure 1).

This study is further

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

supported by Standard & Poor’s Global 1200 Fossil Fuel Free index performance data, which is back

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

tracked to December 2011. As of 31st March 2016, the last 3 years saw an annualised total return of

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

   

17

8.64% compared to the benchmark’s 7.12%, once again with a lower volatility and better risk adjusted

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

return.

  

 

Figure1: https://www.msci.com/resources/factsheets/index_fact_sheet/msci­acwi­ex­fossil­fuels­index­gbp­gross.pdf 

 

 

16

MSCI ACWI Ex Fossil Fuels Index (GBP) 

https://www.msci.com/resources/factsheets/index_fact_sheet/msci­acwi­ex­fossil­fuels­index­gbp­gross.pdf 

17

 S&P Dow Jones Indices,

 S&P Global 1200 Fossil Fuel Index

, available at: 

http://us.spindices.com/indices/equity/sp­global­1200­fossil­fuel­free­index­usd  

 

On the other hand, FTSE Russell’s research into the effects of stranded assets’ timescale includes an eight

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

   

 

year period before the oil crash and during the financial crash of 2008 (figure 2). This period allows us to

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

     

see that divestment has been financially safe without dramatic shifts in the price of oil. As FTSE concluded:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

   

 

 

‘It can be seen that historically over the entire period the return of the two indexes are very close to each

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

other, but the FTSE Developed ex Fossil Fuel index has lower volatility’, similar to the period including the

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

recent oil crash.  

18

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 2: 

http://www.ftse.com/products/downloads/FTSE_Stranded_Assets.pdf

 

Furthermore, Parametric, a US investment management company, looking at a similar period between

 

   

 

 

 

 

     

 

 

 

January 2004 and December 2014, analysed two different indexes: a US based one (the S&P 500) and a

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

global one excluding the US (the MSCI EAFE). They also came to similar conclusions: “[W]e find that

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

divestment can be achieved with minimal impact on portfolio return or volatility over the long­run. In

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

   

other words, an investor can track a standard broad market index reasonably well even while excluding

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fossil fuel related securities.”

These two independent studies show that even before the oil crash and

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19

during a global recession, a divested portfolio can be expected to at least match their benchmarks and

   

 

   

 

 

 

 

     

 

 

 

 

 

maintain better volatility.

 

Taken in combination, the equal levels of annualised volatility and the higher annualised return for the

   

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

index that excludes fossil fuels present evidence that divestment from fossil fuel companies does not

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

increase the risk exposure of a portfolio and may actually increase its profitability. The recent drop in oil

 

 

 

     

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

     

prices shows the real financial impact of being exposed to an increasingly unstable industry, indicating

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

that early divestment from the companies with the most carbon­intensive assets represents a risk­limiting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

strategy. 

 

18

 FTSE Russell, 

FTSE Developed ex Fossil Fuel Index Series

 (London: London Stock Exchange Group companies, 2015), p. 7, 

available at: 

http://www.ftse.com/products/downloads/FTSE_Stranded_Assets.pdf

, accessed 13 May 2016.

 

19

 Jennifer Sireklove, 

Fossil Free Investing

 (Seattle: Parametric, 2015), p. 2, available at: 

https://www.parametricportfolio.com/insights­research/paper/fossil­free­investing

, accessed 13 May 2016. 

 

Section IV. Building a more resilient Fund – shifting capital to alternative investment 

In order to meet the Fund’s future liabilities, reduce risk, enhance financial performance and follow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

environmental, social and governance (ESG) principles, it is necessary that SPF begins to channel its

 

 

 

 

 

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

investments into climate

‐resilient assets. The Strathclyde Pension Fund has clearly recognised the need

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

for a transition and has recently added several sustainable investments to its portfolio. The Direct

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Investment Portfolio of November 2015 lists several investments into the wind energy sector, including

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

local developments and the expansion of existing offshore wind farms. £10 million has been invested in

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

20

Resonance British Wind Energy, £50 million in The Green Investment Bank Offshore Wind Fund, and £30

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

million in Temporis Onshore Wind Fund. Investments have also been made into the development of

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

biogas and reducing methane emissions, including a £10 million investment in Iona Environmental

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

Infrastructure and a further £20 million in Albion Community Power PLC. 

These recent investments are an important step in SPF’s transition away from unsustainable

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

carbon­intensive industries into a portfolio with a long­term focus that recognises the necessity of a

 

 

   

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

     

low­carbon economy to remain below 2℃ of warming and to prevent catastrophic global climate change.

 

   

 

 

   

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

However, if the work done so far is to be applauded, more needs to be done. SPF needs to divest from

   

 

 

 

 

     

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

   

 

 

fossil fuels and channel its investments into  a greener, more sustainable, and more socially just future. 

Further investment opportunities lie in continuing to support and benefit from the growth of the green

 

 

 

   

   

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

energy sector, including community power generation. Money that is divested from the fossil fuel industry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

and reinvested sustainably could produce promising returns in the burgeoning green energy market and in

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

   

other socially responsible sectors such as development of social housing. These sectors would not only

 

 

 

 

   

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

generate long­term sustainable returns, but would have beneficial outcomes for communities at large.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

Investments in these sectors will have a greater effect and mean a great deal more for communities than

   

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

any investments in the fossil fuel industry would. 

Climate change challenges investors to revert from functioning as ‘future takers’ and to become ‘future

 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

makers’ instead.

The investment portfolio of an institution must reflect the low

‐carbon future it claims

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

21

to support. Moreover, Christina Figueres, former chief of the United Nations Climate Change Secretariat,

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

has remarked that fossil fuel divestment ‘is not about excluding any asset from portfolios, [but] about

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

strategically allocating assets to accelerate a shift that is already in place”, further emphasising the

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

   

 

 

 

 

positive effects that be achieved by re

‐investment in the green sector . 

22

 

 

 

20

 Strathclyde Pension Fund, 

Direct Investment Portfolio

 (Glasgow: SPF, 2015), available at:  

http://www.spfo.org.uk/CHttpHandler.ashx?id=31630&p=0 , accessed 15 May 2016.  

21

 Mercer, 

Investing in a Time of Climate Change 

(Mercer, 2015), available at: 

http://www.mercer.com/content/dam/mercer/attachments/global/investments/mercer­climate­change­report­2015.pdf, 
accessed 13 May 2016. 

22

 Business Green, 

BlackRock reveals how it could make it easier for investors to Ditch Fossil Fuels

, (Business Green: 28 Oct 

2015), available at:  
http://www.businessgreen.com/bg/analysis/2432202/blackrock­reveals­how­it­could­make­it­easier­for­investors­to­ditch
­fossil­fuels, accessed 15 May 2016.  

 

i. Review of Ex­Fossil Fuel Indexes and Reinvestment Opportunities 

There is an increasingly diverse range of advisors, fund managers and indexes specialising in assisting

   

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

investors that wish to invest in a low­carbon economy whilst minimising financial risk. The Etho Climate

 

 

   

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leadership Index (ECLI), for example, is based on greenhouse gas emissions and performance according to

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

ESG considerations. Companies identified as ‘laggards’ by this index are outperformed by climate leaders,

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

who are generating a 14.6% greater average return over a ten­year period . The ECLI uses climate

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

23

efficiency as an effective proxy for corporate efficiency and good management, which is ultimately

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

rewarded by improved financial return.  
 
Significantly, the financial mainstream is also actively responding to concerns about stranded assets and

 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

the increasing demand for fossil free products. Following this, new low carbon indexes and fund managers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

are rapidly emerging, providing shareholders with an opportunity of less financially risky investments.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

These include: 

● Green Bond Market indexes such as Barclays MSCI Green Bond Index family; the Solactive Green

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

24

Bond Index; The S&P Dow Jones Green Bond Index; the BofA Merrill Lynch Green Bond Index; 

● BlackRock, the world’s largest fund manager, is due to launch indexes based on the FTSE

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

developed ex Fossil Fuel family.  

25

● The

SPDR S&P 500 Fossil Fuel Free ETF, released December 2015 has already seen $71m in

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

investments.  

26

 

 

 

23

 

Etho Capital. "Etho Climate Leadership Index (ECLI)." 

Etho Capital

. N.p., 2016. available at: 

http://mysocialgoodnews.com/tag/climate­change/page/2/

 

24

 The World Bank, 

Green Bond Fact Sheet 

(Washington: The World Bank, 2013), available at: 

http://treasury.worldbank.org/cmd/pdf/WorldBankGreenBondFactSheet.pdf

, accessed 13 May 2016. 

25

 Business Green, 

BlackRock reveals how it could make it easier for investors to Ditch Fossil Fuels

, (Business Green: 28 Oct 

2015), available at:  
http://www.businessgreen.com/bg/analysis/2432202/blackrock­reveals­how­it­could­make­it­easier­for­investors­to­ditch
­fossil­fuels, accessed 15 May 2016.  

26

 State Street Global Advisors SPDR, ‘SPDR S&P 500 Fossil Fuel Free ETF’, n.d., available at: 

https://www.spdrs.com/product/fund.seam?ticker=spyx

, accessed 13 May 2016. 

 

ii. Global Trends of Reinvestment in Renewables 

The recent landmark Mercer report ‘Investing in a Time of Climate Change’ demonstrates that varying

 

 

 

 

 

     

   

 

 

 

 

 

extremes of climate change will unequivocally impact financial returns of investors (figure 3). The models

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

27

used in this report also determine that the renewables sub­sector could see average annual returns

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

increase by between 6% and 54% over a 35­year time horizon. Conversely, average annual returns from

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the coal sub­sector could fall between 18% and 74% over the same time frame, including more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

pronounced effects in the next decade, with returns eroding between 26% and 138% of average annual

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

returns. Following this, the Bloomberg New Energy Finance in association with FS­UNEP Collaboration

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

Centre has evaluated that the annual global investment in 2015 in renewable energy has reached a new

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

   

 

 

 

   

 

world’s record of $286 billion , which ‘was more than double the estimated $130 billion invested in coal

 

   

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

and gas power stations in 2015.’   

28

Figure

3:

 

 

http://www.mercer.com/content/dam/mercer/attachments/global/investments/mercer­climate­change­report­2015.pdf

 

 

 

 

27

 Mercer, 

Investing in a Time of Climate Change 

(Mercer, 2015), available at: 

http://www.mercer.com/content/dam/mercer/attachments/global/investments/mercer­climate­change­report­2015.pdf, 
accessed 13 May 2016. 

28

 

Joseph Byrne 

et al

. (Frankfurt School­UNEP Centre), 

Global Trends in Renewable Energy Investment 2016

, (Frankfurt: 

Frankfurt School of Finance and Management, 2016), available at: 
http://fs­unep­centre.org/sites/default/files/publications/globaltrendsinrenewableenergyinvestment2016lowres_0.pdf

, 

accessed 13 May 2016.